Number of new COVID-19 infections in Saudi Arabia falls with 348 recorded

Saudi Arabia recorded 20 more deaths from the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) and 348 new cases of the disease on Sunday. (SPA)
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Updated 18 October 2020

Number of new COVID-19 infections in Saudi Arabia falls with 348 recorded

  • The total number of recoveries in the Kingdom has increased to 328,538
  • A total of 5,185 people have succumbed to the virus in the Kingdom so far

LONDON: Saudi Arabia recorded 20 more deaths from the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) and 348 new cases of the disease on Sunday.
Of the new cases, 73 were announced in Madinah, 32 in Yanbu, 25 in Riyadh, 17 in Makkah, 13 in Jeddah and 12 in Unayzah.
The total number of recoveries in the Kingdom increased to 328,538 after 373 more patients recovered from the virus.
A total of 5,185 people have succumbed to the virus in the Kingdom so far.

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Mansour bin Sultan Al-Turki, member of the Saudi Shoura Council

Updated 47 min 14 sec ago

Mansour bin Sultan Al-Turki, member of the Saudi Shoura Council

Mansour bin Sultan Al-Turki, the former security spokesman for the Interior Ministry, has been a member of the Shoura Council since October.

In 1975, he attended King Saud University for almost one year, but after hearing about the scholarship programs offered by some ministries, he applied to the Interior Ministry and was accepted for a scholarship to the US to study electrical engineering.

There, he completed a three-month English language course in San Francisco before moving to Spokane in Washington state, where he completed a bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering, graduating in 1980.

After returning to Saudi Arabia, Al-Turki joined the traffic department at the General Directorate of Public Security. He rose in military rank to the level of major general. Al-Turki served as security spokesperson for the Interior Ministry — the first position of its kind at the ministry — from 2004 until his retirement this year. He was also head of the ministry’s control and supervision center from 1994 to 2004.

Speaking to the “Alliwan” program on Rotana Khalijia satellite TV channel, Al-Turki said that when Al-Qaeda began to target Saudi Arabia in 2003, there was no spokesperson for the Interior Ministry. “Those attacks affected oil prices, and some people had the false perception that Saudi Arabia was unable to confront terrorism. So there was a need for a spokesperson who could make clear what the Kingdom was doing in that regard, and also reassure people about their country’s security capabilities,” he said.