UAE-based NMC Health’s debt up at $6.6 billion

NMC Health, which has been in crisis since US firm Muddy Waters’ short attack, revised its debt position from $5 billion earlier in March. (NMC Health Facebook)
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Updated 24 March 2020

UAE-based NMC Health’s debt up at $6.6 billion

  • The company revised its debt position from $5 billion earlier in March
  • Concerns that founder BR Shetty’s financial troubles could be spreading to other companies he is associated with

Troubled UAE hospital operator NMC Health said on Tuesday its debt pile now stood at $6.6 billion, much higher than earlier estimates, and that it has appointed a former PwC partner as chief restructuring officer to tackle the problem.
The company, which has been in crisis since US firm Muddy Waters’ short attack, revised its debt position from $5 billion earlier in March, and named Matthew J. Wilde as chief restructuring officer.
“We are certain that his expertise and experience will bring significant benefit to the Group as NMC develops a plan to address the Group’s financial indebtedness,” NMC said.
Wilde has been involved in many major restructurings in the Middle East region in recent years including DubaiWorld, DryDocks World, Carillion, Al Jaber Group and OW Bunker, NMC said.
NMC’s stock price had dwindled in value before being placed on suspension since Muddy Waters questioned its financial statements in December. Following which, NMC’s founder BR Shetty stepped down from the board last month.
There are concerns that Shetty’s financial troubles could be spreading to other companies he is associated with, including payments group Finablr, which he helped found in 2018.
There are cheques that could go up to $50 million, which may have been used as security for financing arrangements for the benefit of third parties, NMC said as it announced the departure of finance chief Prasanth Shenoy after a period of extended leave for ill health.
On the coronavirus outbreak, NMC said it has taken steps to meet the health and safety needs of the community.


Saudi bourse’s 2020 net profit surged ahead of listing

Updated 24 June 2021

Saudi bourse’s 2020 net profit surged ahead of listing

  • Net profit rose 227 percent in 2020 from a year earlier

DUBAI: Saudi Tadawul Group, the owner and operator of the country’s stock market, said its net profit rose 227 percent in 2020 from a year earlier, while revenue more than doubled with a boost from trading commissions.
It posted a profit after zakat or Islamic tax of 500.5 million riyals ($133.5 million), it said in a statement.
Unlisted Tadawul gave a peak of its earnings ahead of a planned initial public offering later this year that will allow it to expand and strengthen its position globally.
Saudi Arabia’s stock exchange has converted itself into a holding company ahead of the listing.
Tadawul is the ninth largest exchange in the world in terms of market capitalization which stood at around $2.6 trillion, partly boosted by the listing oil giant Saudi Aramco in 2019.


Saudi Mobily and Zain mull towers listing

Updated 24 June 2021

Saudi Mobily and Zain mull towers listing

  • “Options include forming a consortium to buy phone towers owned by both parties
  • Another option is to operate the towers on behalf of the two companies through an intermediary

RIYADH: Etihad Etisalat Co. (Mobily) and Mobile Telecommunication Company Saudi Arabia (Zain KSA) are studying several options regarding Towers Co., including the possibility of listing as much as 30 percent in the Saudi market, CNBC Arabia reported, citing two banking sources.
Financial regulators in the Kingdom agreed to the merger earlier this year.
“There are several options on the table and consultants have been appointed to study the matter,” an investment banking source told CNBC Arabia.
“Options include forming a consortium to buy phone towers owned by both parties by acquiring a minority stake with Mobily and Zain enjoying majority stakes,” said the source.
“There is also an option to operate these towers on behalf of the two companies through an intermediary company with a rate of return (RoR) system,” he added.
Consultants have already been appointed to study the proposed offering, with discussions currently underway, another source said.
“The aim is to reach an appropriate choice about the matter at a time when the two companies are looking to maximize their returns from the assets of the towers activity after the merger, as those towers are estimated at more than 18,000 towers,” he said.
An alliance of companies outside Saudi Arabia may join local firms to acquire a stake in the new company, the banking source said.


Saudi Arabia’s Bank AlJazira to raise $500m via Islamic bond sale

Updated 24 June 2021

Saudi Arabia’s Bank AlJazira to raise $500m via Islamic bond sale

  • The sale is of Additional Tier 1 bonds, the riskiest debt a banks can issue
  • The sukuk will price in the range of 3.95 percent to 4.05 percent

DUBAI: Bank AlJazira is expected to raise $500 million on Thursday via an Islamic bond sale, a document showed on Thursday.
The bond or sukuk will price in the range of 3.95 percent to 4.05 percent, tighter than initial guidance of between 4.25 percent and 4.375 percent after the deal attracted more than $1 billion in orders, the document from one of the banks on the deal showed.
Alinma Investment Company, Aljazira Capital and JPMorgan are arranging the deal, which is expected to launch later on Thursday, the document, which was reviewed by Reuters, showed.
The deal is for Additional Tier 1 bonds, the riskiest debt instruments banks can issue, which are designed to be perpetual in nature but issuers can redeem or “call” them after a specified period. AlJazira’s sukuk will be non-callable for five years.
The deal was the latest in a series of international debt sales from the Gulf, as banks, companies and governments take advantage of low interest rates to bolster finances hit by last year’s oil price crash and the COVID-19 crisis.
Gulf banks and companies are expected to make up a clear majority of total issuance this year, a change for a region where sovereigns made up roughly half of all issuance last year and in 2019.
Several banks in the region have issued AT1 bonds this year to bolster their Tier 1 capital, including Kuwait Finance House selling $750 million AT1 Islamic bonds on Wednesday at 3.6 percent.


Sudan gold exchange to help bolster foreign-currency reserves

Updated 24 June 2021

Sudan gold exchange to help bolster foreign-currency reserves

  • Most Sudanese gold is smuggled out of the country
  • Exchange will initially offer spot trades only, with futures and options to come

RIYADH: The launch of a gold exchange in Sudan will help regulate trade in the yellow metal and eliminate the smuggling that has led to a scarcity of foreign currency in the country, the Financial Markets Authority (FMA) Director General, Shawgi Azmi said in an interview with Asharq.

In 2019, 127 tons of Sudanese gold was traded on foreign exchanges, while official statistics from the central bank showed that Sudanese production amounted to only 20 tons, he said.

Sudan is one of the largest African gold miners, producing between 70 and 120 tons annually, and as many as 5 million of its citizens involved in gold prospecting, Azmi said.

The gold exchange will start with the spot sales only, while other terms of trade, such as futures contracts and options, are expected to be introduced at a later stage.

Sudan’s prime minister is expected to agree soon to launch a commodities exchange focused on agricultural crops, while the FMA is researching a livestock exchange, Azmi said.


Dubai plastic waste-to-clothes startup looks to KSA

Updated 24 June 2021

Dubai plastic waste-to-clothes startup looks to KSA

  • The company converts plastic bottles — collected from schools, events and businesses across the city — into clothes
  • The UAE produces at least 10 million recyclable bottles per day

ABU DHABI: A Dubai company that makes clothing from plastic water bottles plans to expand in Saudi Arabia and Egypt after the pandemic forced a complete rethink of its business model.

DGrade was established by Kris Barber in 2010 to address the vast amount of plastic water bottles being produced in the UAE.

The company converts plastic bottles — collected from schools, events and businesses across the city — into clothes.

(DGrade website)

But when the pandemic closed schools across the country, DGrade was forced to rethink how it operates. It also provided the impetus for the company to consider moving into new regional markets.

The clothes-making process begins by putting the plastic through hot and cold washing until it turns into flakes.

“Once we have the flakes, they’re then put through an extrusion process and turned into a fiber,” Emma Barber, managing director of DGrade, told Arab News. Its plant takes about 150,000 bottles per hour and 75 million bottles per month, she added.

Dubai British School event. (Dgrade Website)

Before the pandemic, the team used to collect plastics from schools and events around Dubai, Barber said. But with the closure of schools and a ban on events, DGrade was faced with a potential halt in its raw material.

Despite the closures, it still managed to collect 1 million bottles in the 2019-2020 school year.

“A lot of children have been collecting plastics at home, bringing them to schools and dropping them off,” Barber said.

Simply Bottles Al Mamzar Clean-up, November 2018. (DGrade website)

“We’re planning to expand in Saudi Arabia because of the huge population and also the amount of plastic.”

She said Egypt is also attractive because of its huge population, plastic waste issues and an already well-established textiles sector.

DGrade also plans to import plastic from Gulf countries. It is coordinating with companies in Saudi Arabia, Kuwait and Qatar to bail plastic and bring it to the UAE, Barber added.

Simply Bottles Green Fair, ENOC head office. (DGrade website)

On financial support from the banks, she said: “We’ve been looking for some working capital in terms of bridging loans. It has been difficult because the banks are unable to give you that kind of money due to local legislation and restrictions.”

But she said DGrade will soon announce a second round of investment with a large European company that plans to take an equity share.

“Without the investment that we managed to obtain, it would’ve been almost impossible to fund what we’ve done so far on our own,” Barber added.

To expand the business further, she said it coordinated with some companies to place outdoor bins at private events, which are chargeable at 100 UAE dirhams ($27.23) per month, in order to collect as many bottles as possible.

“We’re talking to ministries, waste management companies and private sector organizations to see if we can place larger cages into residential and community areas so people can place plastic at their convenience,” she added.

Dubai Chamber Sustainability Network. (DGrade website)

Like many companies large and small, DGrade was forced to slash costs during the pandemic. It moved to a smaller office, reduced staff wages and made half of their team redundant, Barber said.

The UAE produces at least 10 million recyclable bottles per day and the output is 18 million kg per year of recycled flake, she added.

Multiple companies have switched back to bottled water and away from dispensers in order to keep their staff safe, she said.

DGrade targets uniform or work-wear companies across all sectors. It has developed 200 types of fabric, all from recycled polyester.

Expo 2020 Dubai T-shirts @Expo 2020 Winter Festival Sale, December 2019. (DGrade website)

“The traditional fashion industry is highly polluting and damaging to the environment,” said Barber. “Traditional fabrics, such as cotton, are highly water- and land-intensive. They also use pesticides and fertilizers.”

Every year, 100 billion garments are produced worldwide and 92 million tons become waste, according to a 2021 BBC Earth report.

DGrade’s aim is not to promote the use of plastic, but to ensure that when it is used it is being responsibly managed and recycled, Barber said.

“In 99 percent of cases, recyclable plastic is the greenest packaging option available. It’s far better for the environment to use plastic than glass, aluminum or paper,” she added.

DGrade’s process of converting plastic to clothes produces 55 percent fewer carbon emissions, and uses 20 percent less water (which it recycles and reuses) and 50 percent less energy, she said.