Sudan rebel faction, govt hold first round of talks

President of Sudanese Transitional Council General Abdel Fattah al-Burhan (L) and President of South Sudan Salva Kiir attend a meeting to endorse the peace talks between Sudan's government and rebel leaders in Juba, South Sudan, on October 14, 2019. (AFP)
Updated 19 October 2019

Sudan rebel faction, govt hold first round of talks

  • Transitional government and rebel leaders kick off talks to end country’s years-long civil wars

CAIRO: Sudan’s largest single rebel group on Friday held its first round of direct peace talks with the country’s transitional government, despite an earlier boycott following a military crackdown.

The new transitional government and other rebel leaders kicked off talks on Monday in South Sudan’s capital, Juba, aimed at ending Sudan’s years-long civil wars.
The talks come in the wake of an August power-sharing agreement between the army and a pro-democracy movement following the overthrow of autocratic former President Omar Bashir.
The Sudan People’s Liberation Movement-North (SPLM-N), led by Abdel Aziz Al-Hilu, had canceled talks with the government that were scheduled for Wednesday after the paramilitary Rapid Support Forces set up a checkpoint and detained 16 people in South Kordofan Province. Three people were later released. The group said others were attacked but didn’t provide details.
The Rapid Support Forces are led by Gen. Mohammed Hamadan Dagalo, a member of the Sudan’s transitional Sovereign Council, who also leads the government delegation to the Juba talks.
On the resumption of talks, Ammar Amoun, head of the SPLM-N movement’s delegation, told reporters late on Thursday that the government had taken “positive steps to correct earlier mistakes.”
Following this week’s attacks, Gen. Abdel-Fattah Burhan, head of the Sovereign Council, declared a nationwide cease-fire on Wednesday.
The SPLM-N had vowed earlier not to resume the talks unless the government released the detainees, withdrew from the area where they were seized, and declared a documented cease-fire.
“We asked mediators to follow-up with the government until all flaws are addressed,” Amoun told reporters Thursday. “However, this should not prevent us from going back to the negotiation table.”
In a three-hour meeting, the two parties discussed prospects for peace in the Blue Nile and South Kordofan provinces, where SPLM-N controls significant chunks of territory.
Achieving peace is crucial to the transitional government in Sudan. It has counted on ending the wars with rebel groups to revive the country’s battered economy through slashing the military spending, which takes up much of the national budget. Transitional authorities have set a six-month deadline for making peace with the rebel groups.
Meanwhile, separate talks are being held with the Sudan Revolutionary Front (SRF), an alliance of several other rebel groups from restive western Darfur, as well as the Blue Nile and South Kordofan provinces.
SRF spokesman Osama Said told The Associated Press that he expects a deal with the government soon.


UK summons Iran envoy as Nazanin Zaghari-Ratcliffe faces return to jail

Updated 30 October 2020

UK summons Iran envoy as Nazanin Zaghari-Ratcliffe faces return to jail

  • Husband Richard Ratcliffe: Iran has ordered Nazanin to report to court for a new trial on Monday and then back to jail
  • Foreign Secretary Dominic Raab: Britain has made it clear to Iran “that is entirely unjustified and totally unacceptable and must not happen”

LONDON: Britain on Friday warned Iran against throwing detained woman Nazanin Zaghari-Ratcliffe back in jail, after hauling in Tehran’s envoy for a dressing-down over her emotive case.
The Foreign Office summoned Ambassador Hamid Baeidinejad on Thursday to hear renewed demands from a senior official for an end to the British-Iranian captive’s “arbitrary detention.”
Foreign Secretary Dominic Raab told BBC radio Zaghari-Ratcliffe was in a “horrific position,” after her husband said Iran has ordered her to report to court for a new trial on Monday and then back to jail.
Britain has made it clear to Iran “that is entirely unjustified and totally unacceptable and must not happen,” Raab said.
Zaghari-Ratcliffe, who will turn 42 on Boxing Day, has been on temporary release from Tehran’s Evin prison and under house arrest since earlier this year because of the coronavirus pandemic.
She has spent more than four years in jail, or under house arrest, since being detained in the Iranian capital in April 2016 while visiting relatives with her young daughter.
Zaghari-Ratcliffe, who worked for the Thomson Reuters Foundation — the media organization’s philanthropic arm — denied charges of sedition but was convicted and jailed for five years.

Nazanin Zaghari-Ratcliffe has spent more than four years in jail, or under house arrest, since being detained in the Iranian capital in April 2016. (AFP)

Her husband Richard Ratcliffe said this week that the Foreign Office’s handling of the case “seems disastrous,” and that “the UK is dancing to Iran’s tune.”
Raab told the BBC: “We’ve made it very clear we want to try to put the relationship between the UK and Iran on a better footing.
“If Nazanin is returned to prison, that will of course put our discussions and the basis of those discussions in a totally different place. It is entirely unacceptable.”
Richard Ratcliffe linked the latest development to the postponement of a hearing that was due to take place on Tuesday in London to address Iran’s longstanding demand for the repayment by Britain of hundreds of millions from an old military equipment order.
“As Nazanin’s husband, I do think that if she’s not home for Christmas, there’s every chance this could run for years,” he said, accusing Iran of “hostage diplomacy.”