Six children dead, 14 injured in Iraq road accident

Children receive medical care at a hospital after six primary-school students were killed and 14 others were injured when a refrigerator truck veered into a group of children in Basra, Iraq April 2, 2024. (REUTERS)
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Updated 03 April 2024
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Six children dead, 14 injured in Iraq road accident

  • The driver lost control after the truck’s brakes failed and plowed into a group of students from a nearby primary school who were walking on the roadside in the town of Hartha, on the northern outskirts of Basra, police and witnesses said

BASRA: Six primary-school students were killed and 14 others were injured when a refrigerator truck veered into a group of children in the southern Iraqi city of Basra on Tuesday, the Interior Ministry said in a statement.
The driver lost control after the truck’s brakes failed and plowed into a group of students from a nearby primary school who were walking on the roadside in the town of Hartha, on the northern outskirts of Basra, police and witnesses said.
Hospital sources said some of the wounded children are in critical condition with severe head injuries.
Iraqi Prime Minister Mohammed Shia Al-Sudani ordered an immediate investigation into the fatal accident, his office said in a statement.

 


Hostages forum says two captives died while held by Hamas in Gaza

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Hostages forum says two captives died while held by Hamas in Gaza

JERUSALEM: Israeli campaign group the Hostages and Missing Families Forum announced on Monday that two captives held by Hamas in Gaza had died.
The deaths of Yagev Buchshtab, 35, and Alex Dancyg, 76, who were abducted during the October 7 attack by Hamas, are a “stark reminder of the urgency” to bring the hostages home, the forum said in a statement.
It did not provide any information on how they had died.
“Their bodies are being held by the Hamas terror organization,” the Israeli military said in a separate statement.
“The circumstances of their death in Hamas captivity are being examined by all the professional authorities.”
Buchshtab was abducted from his home in Kibbutz Nirim along with his wife Rimon Buchshtab-Kirsht, who was released after 50 days in captivity, the forum said.
Dancyg, who was born to Holocaust survivors, worked at Yad Vashem, the International Holocaust Remembrance Institute, and trained thousands of guides there, it added.
Hostages who were held captive with him reported that Dancyg spent his time in captivity giving history lectures to fellow captives, the forum said.
“Yagev and Alex were taken alive and should have returned alive to their families and to their country,” the forum said.
“Their death in captivity is a tragic reflection of the consequences of foot-dragging in negotiations,” it said referring to ceasefire talks that have dragged on for months.
During the October 7 attack, Hamas militants seized 251 hostages, 116 of whom are still in Gaza, including 44 the Israeli military and officials say are dead.
The attack by Hamas resulted in the deaths of 1,195 people, mostly civilians, according to an AFP tally based on official Israeli figures.
Israel’s retaliatory campaign has killed at least 39,006 people in Gaza, also mostly civilians, according to data from the health ministry in the Hamas-ruled territory.

Iraq resumes rice cultivation after two-year ban with new climate friendly strain

Updated 22 July 2024
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Iraq resumes rice cultivation after two-year ban with new climate friendly strain

  • Iraq is one of the world’s top 10 importers of rice and wheat, to supply a huge food rationing program held over from the era of former ruler Saddam Hussein

BAGHDAD: Iraq has resumed rice cultivation after a two-year ban prompted by water scarcity, and is testing out a strain of the grain that consumes less water than traditionally planted versions.
Deputy Minister of Agriculture Mahdi Sahar Al-Jubouri told Reuters the country has earmarked 150 sq km (58 sq miles) for rice growing this season and forecast a yield of 150,000 tons, as officials said water is more abundant due to heavy winter rainfall and the promise of more water flows from Turkiye.
This follows a two-year production ban which saw just 5 to 10 sq km of rice planted annually for the purpose of seed extraction, amid a water crisis that experts say was tied to upstream dams built by Turkiye and Iran, less rainfall and other climate change-driven factors.
Iraq is one of the world’s top 10 importers of rice and wheat, to supply a huge food rationing program held over from the era of former ruler Saddam Hussein.
Decades ago, the country grew most of its own rice and exported wheat and barley and at one time was the world’s top exporter of dates, until problems with soil salinity, poor irrigation systems, drought and decades of conflict all hit its agricultural sector and made it a major buyer on world markets.
Iraq will still need to import around 1.25 million tons of rice this year to meet domestic demand, the same as last year, grain board officials said.

HYBRID VARIETY
Rice farming in Iraq typically begins in June and concludes with a harvest in November.
Several varieties of rice are grown, with the Amber rice, known for its unique aroma and flavour, the most popular.
Iraqi agricultural scientists have developed a new strain of rice, named Ghiri, which is a hybrid of the Amber and Jasmine varieties and can be planted using fixed sprayers without the need for flooding. It has been planted on a small scale this season under trial after being tested at the Al-Mishkhab Research Station last year.
Plans are in place to broaden its cultivation in future seasons, Jubouri said in an interview with Reuters.
The government aims for the sector to transition from the traditional irrigation method, which involves flooding the crop with water, to using fixed irrigation systems and mechanical seeders.
Farmers adopting modern agricultural methods like sprinkler systems will be offered incentives akin to the support provided for wheat production such as higher prices for their produce, Jubouri said.
For the current 2024 season, rice farming has been permitted in five provinces: Najaf, Diwaniyah, Muthanna, Dhi Qar and Babel. Najaf province has been allocated the largest share.
Muhsin Abdul Ameer, head of the farmers’ association in Najaf province, said that approximately 80 sq km of agricultural land in the province has been planted, representing about 37 percent of the total agricultural land allocated across the country. The planted varieties include Amber, Jasmine and Euphrates rice.
Abdul Ameer said the planting season in Najaf province, which began in the middle of June, has now been completed.
The water, agriculture and marshes committee in the Iraqi parliament said rainfall last winter and pledges from Turkiye to increase Iraq’s access to water released from the Tigris and Euphrates Rivers that originate in Turkiye had enabled the resumption of rice growing.
Lawmaker Hussain Mardan, deputy chairman of the committee, told Reuters that agricultural land will be expanded in the coming years by adopting drip irrigation methods for rice, which are currently under study, potentially reaching 1,000 sq km.


Canadian citizen attempted a stabbing attack in Israel, Israeli police say

Updated 22 July 2024
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Canadian citizen attempted a stabbing attack in Israel, Israeli police say

JERUSALEM: Israeli police said on Monday that a Canadian citizen attempted a stabbing attack in a southern Israeli town and was "neutralised".
The police referred to the incident as a terrorist attack.


Houthi harbor still ablaze days after Israel strikes on Yemen

Updated 22 July 2024
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Houthi harbor still ablaze days after Israel strikes on Yemen

  • Hodeidah port is a vital entry point for fuel imports and international aid for Houthi-held areas of Yemen, a country where the United Nations says more than half the population relies on humanitarian assistance

HODEIDAH: Firefighting teams on Monday were struggling to contain a massive blaze at Yemen’s Hodeida port, days after a deadly Israeli strike hit oil tanks and a power plant in the harbor.
Heavy flames and black smoke were seen spiralling into the sky for a third consecutive day following the strike on Saturday, said an AFP correspondent in Hodeidah.
Firefighting teams appear to have made little progress, with the blaze seemingly expanding in some parts of the port, the correspondent said, amid fears it could reach food storage facilities.
High-resolution satellite images taken by Maxar Technologies showed flames consuming a heavily damaged fuel storage area at the Hodeidah harbor.
The fuel depot is run by the Yemen Petroleum Company which said late Sunday that the six people killed in the Israel strike were its employees.
The Houthis say more than 80 others were wounded in the attack, many of them with severe burns.
With black smoke billowing overhead, a funeral ceremony was held Monday for the victims of the strikes.
Their coffins were carried through the streets of Hodeidah, flanked by crowds and led by a Houthi marching band.
The strike on Saturday was the first by Israel on the Arabian Peninsula’s poorest country and came in response to a Houthi drone strike that breached Israel’s air defenses, killing one person in Tel Aviv the day before.
The Houthis, who are fighting Israel, have pledged a “huge” response to the strikes and threatened to once again attack Tel Aviv.
Yemeni port authorities said Hodeidah “is operating at its full capacity,” according to the rebels’ Saba news agency.
“We are working around the clock to receive all ships and there is no concern about the supply chain and supplies of food, medicine, and oil derivatives,” port official Nasr Al-Nusairi was quoted by Saba as saying on Sunday.
But the US-based Navanti Group said the strikes on Hodeidah destroyed five cranes and reduced the port’s fuel storage capacity from 150,000 to 50,000 tons.
Hodeidah port is a vital entry point for fuel imports and international aid for Houthi-held areas of Yemen, a country where the United Nations says more than half the population relies on humanitarian assistance.
“Hodeidah port is a vital lifeline for delivering humanitarian aid to Yemen,” the International Rescue Committee (IRC) said in an emailed statement to AFP.
“Any impact on this infrastructure jeopardizes the entry of essential goods and hampers aid efforts.”


UAE jails 57 Bangladeshis, including 3 for life, over riots

Updated 22 July 2024
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UAE jails 57 Bangladeshis, including 3 for life, over riots

  • Life imprisonment handed to three people who called for the demonstrations to pressure their home government
  • The remaining 53 defendants received 10-year prison terms

ABU DHABI: The UAE has imprisoned 57 Bangladeshis, including 3 for life, for inciting riots on Friday in several streets across the country, state news agency WAM reported.

The Abu Dhabi Federal Court of Appeal handed the life imprisonment terms to three people who called for the demonstrations to pressure their home government.

The remaining 53 defendants received 10-year prison terms, with one, who entered the country illegally and took part in the riot, being sentenced to 11 years.

The Bangladeshi nationals will be deported after serving their sentences, WAM reported.

On Friday, UAE Attorney-General Hamad Saif Al-Shamsi ordered an investigation into the arrest of several Bangladeshi nationals who were apprehended for inciting riots against their home country, which has been struggling to quell violent student-led protests over a controversial job quota scheme.

The investigation, led by a team of 30, confirmed the defendants’ involvement in assembling in public spaces, “inciting unrest, disrupting public security, and promoting such gatherings and protests,” WAM said.

They recorded and published audiovisual footage of their actions online. A court witness during the trial said that demonstrators did not respond to a police warning to disperse, according to WAM.

The witness confirmed that the defendants gathered and organised large-scale marches in several streets across the UAE in protest against decisions made by the Bangladeshi government.

Several of the defendants confessed to the crimes with which they were accused.