Indian diplomat summoned over misrepresentation of Pakistan’s minority affairs — FO

This undated file photo shows the exterior of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs premises in Islamabad. (Supplied)
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Updated 19 January 2020

Indian diplomat summoned over misrepresentation of Pakistan’s minority affairs — FO

  • A Sikh man was killed in Peshawar on Jan. 11 on his fiancee’s order, according to police
  • India condemned the killing and claimed it was an attack on minorities in Pakistan

ISLAMABAD: The Foreign Office summoned a senior Indian diplomat on Saturday over what it sees as New Delhi’s deliberately false portrayal of the state of minority affairs in Pakistan.
“The authorities in India were urged to refrain from feigning concern for minorities elsewhere for narrow political agenda; focus on putting their own house in order,” the Foreign Office said in a statement on Saturday evening.
The Foreign Office move comes after India has condemned the killing of Sikh man Parvender Singh in Peshawar on Jan. 11. 
According to police reports the murder was ordered by Singh’s fiancee over personal reasons.
Singh’s family has since then spoken out in defense of Pakistan, and iterated that they have never received threats in their hometown in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, where they have lived for nine decades.
The Indian government has been facing since December last year violent protests over its new citizenship laws, which are widely seen as targeting the country’s Muslim community.


UN says Pakistan economy could take ‘enormous hit’ by virus fallout 

Updated 5 min 18 sec ago

UN says Pakistan economy could take ‘enormous hit’ by virus fallout 

  •  Developing nations need $2.5 trillion coronavirus support package, UN report says
  • Suggests around $500 million will be needed for emergency health services and related programs

GENEVA : The UN Conference on Trade and Development placed Pakistan, among other developing countries, to be hardest-hit by the economic crisis caused by coronavirus pandemic, according to a report released Monday.

Sub-Saharan African countries will be among the hardest hit alongside others including Pakistan and Argentina, said Richard Kozul-Wright, director of globalization and development strategies at UNCTAD who oversaw the report.

Their economies will take “enormous hit” from high capital outflows, lost export earnings due to falling commodity prices and currency depreciations, with an overall impact likely worse than the 2008 crisis, the UN report said on Monday.

According to the report titled “The COVID-19 Shock to Developing Countries,” the developing nations will need a $2.5 trillion support package this year to face the economic crisis from the virus fallout.

Needed measures will include a $1 trillion liquidity injection and a $1 trillion dollar debt relief package and another $500 million will be needed for emergency health services and related programs, on top of capital controls, the report added.

Referring to a “frightening combination” of factors including mounting debts, a potential deflationary spiral and a major health crisis, Kozul-Wright said that according to conservative estimate, coronavirus would cause a $2-$3 trillion financing deficit over this year and next..

“The international institutions have to take these sorts of proposals very, very seriously as it’s the only way that we can see to prevent the damage already taking place and which will get worse,” he added.

In an early sign of the impact, portfolio outflows from main emerging economies were $59 billion a month between February and March compared to $26.7 billion in the immediate aftermath of the 2008 crisis, the report said.

UNCTAD considers around 170 countries to be developing but the financing gap figure stripped out China and South Korea.