Lahore’s 13 gates to bygone glory

Delhi gate, one of Lahore's most famous gates, still shows signs of some of its old grandeur. (AN Photo)
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Updated 30 December 2019

Lahore’s 13 gates to bygone glory

  • The gates of Lahore’s old city were the crown jewels of its legendary history, with only six still standing
  • Life inside the walled city has its own distinct culture, food and traditions 

LAHORE — The city of Lahore was established on the banks of the Ravi River centuries ago. 

Due to continuous invasions, pillage, and attacks, the city had a high brick wall built around it with 12 gates and one narrow passageway, bringing the total to 13. 

But half of Lahore’s grand gates were destroyed. Six continue to stand, and carry some traces of their past, with each boasting its own unique history.

“The real gates of Lahore were demolished in the British era. A few gates were reconstructed again but not in their original structure. Now, seven out of the 13 have vanished,” Najum Saqib, Director Conservation, Walled City Lahore Authority (WCLA), told Arab News.

Inside the old city, life seems to exist largely untouched by time. Many streets are too narrow for cars and every crooked alleyway has its own story to tell about the unique culture of its locals.

Taxali Gate-

In the past, invaders entered Lahore from the West, and the first gate they would see was the Taxali, home of Lahore’s infamous old Red Light District. This is also the site of Lahore’s Gawalmandi, or food street, a bustling tourist destination packed full of delectable local treats, their recipes passed down through the generations.

Taxali was historically an upper-class area of the city. The subcontinent’s renowned musicians and singers belonged to neighborhoods inside the gate. 

The British demolished Taxali Gate for military reasons and it was never built again.

Bhatti gate-

This is the second gate on the western side. The old structure was demolished and rebuilt by the British. It remains a bustling center of commerce but locals say increasing urbanization has marred the traditional values of life inside the old gate. 

“The life inside Bhatti gate is not the same. There was a time when everyone knew everyone. Now people are more secretive about their work, their life and not open with each other the way they once were,” Mian Ismaeel, 93, a resident of Bhatti gate, told Arab News.

Mori Gate-

Mori gate, to the south, was never considered a gate by historians. 
“Mori gate has not been considered a gate in any historical writing but the people of Lahore always counted it as the 13th gate. The gate has been destroyed and not even a single sign remains,” Adil Lahori, head of Lahore Heritage Foundation, told Arab News. 
Presently, the area has been turned into Lahore’s biggest fish market.




A narrow street, once the standing ground of the unofficial 13th gate of Lahore- Mori Gate which was demolished by the British. Dec. 1, 2019. (AN Photo)

Lahori Gate-

This gate still stands-- the first gate constructed by Emperor Akbar. It faces Anarkali Bazar and remains a commercial hub to this day.

Once, the glamorous red-light district was located inside Lahori Gate, and the city’s richest dancers would reside here in beautiful palaces called Havelis.

A few derelict Havelis still exist, inhabited by multiple families without a care for the historic value of their homes. 
The area was also the first international market of the sub-continent as Europeans began the business of buying indigo here. It was the biggest market of the indigo dye in the world, and Lahore its biggest producer.

“It is a wrong perception that the West started the business of spices in the sub-continent first... rather they started buying bluing from here and exported it to Europe,” Adil Lahori said.




Lahori Gate as it stands today, rebuilt by the British in the 19th century. Dec. 1, 2019. (AN Photo)

Shah Alam Gate-

Lovingly called Shahalmi by Lahore’s residents, the original gate was destroyed when its buildings and a majority of its residents were reduced to ashes during pre-partition riots in 1946. 
It was once a Hindu-dominated area and a hub of commerce and trade. Even today, it depicts the same tradition of business with one of Asia’s largest wholesale markets. 

 “In 1957, the partly burnt Shahalmi Gate was pulled down by the Lahore administration for rebuilding-- a dream that never came true,” said Ahmad Hassan, 90, an old resident of Shahalmi.





The facade of shop-fronts where Shah Alam Gate once stood before being burnt to the ground in the 1946 pre-partition riots. Dec 1, 2019. (AN Photo)


Mochi Gate-

Inside the Mochi gate, shops sell dry fruit, fireworks, and kites. The area is home to iconic Shi’ite buildings, nestled in the middle of the walled city’s network of narrow and bustling streets, from where the annual procession of Moharram begins. 

Historically, the area inside Mochi gate served as the city’s ‘ordinance factory,’ where arrows, swords, bows, horse-saddles, and javelins were produced.

Mochi gate was also demolished by the British.




Street in Lahore's walled city, once leading to Mochi gate before it was destroyed by the British during colonial rule. Dec. 1, 2019. (AN Photo).

Akbari Gate- 

Within this gate, there was a great spice market during the Mughal era, with traders visiting from all over South and Central Asia. Even today, it is considered an important market for spices and grain.

“This is a centuries’ old market of spices that not only caters to the needs of Pakistan but also Afghanistan. The Afghans buy spices from here and export them to the Central Asian states,” Hammad Butt, a spice trader, told Arab News.

The British East India Company began its trade of spices from this very place. The original gate was demolished by the British.




Akbari Gate of Lahore's famous fort. The gate was used by Mughal kings to get into the fort and the city. Dec. 1, 2019. (AN Photo)

Delhi Gate-

The famous ‘Delhi Darwaza’ is situated on the eastern side of Lahore’s Walled City and opens in the direction of Delhi in India, the capital of the Mughal dynasty. 

The gate has been conserved by authorities and is illuminated at night for tourists. 




Delhi gate, one of Lahore's most famous gates, still shows signs of some of its old grandeur. (AN Photo)

Kashmiri Gate-

 Kashmiri gate is so named because of its direction toward the valley of Kashmir. It houses one of the biggest cloth markets in Asia-- Azam Cloth Market. 




A view of the walled city's Kashmiri gate. The original gate was razed to the ground and in its current form built by the British government in India. The gate has been renovated several times. Dec. 1, 2019. (AN Photo)

Yakki Gate- 

The last gate on the eastern side, where several Mughal courtiers spent their lives, with the remains of their Havelis still existing. The gate was demolished during the British Raj and never constructed again. 




A road and market that was once the location of the ancient Yakki gate. Dec. 1, 2019. (AN Photo) 

Khizri Gate-

This gate was constructed on the banks of the Ravi river flowing by the city walls, with residents traveling by boats. The gate still stands but in a derelict state.

Masti Gate-

This was the gate the Mughals used to reach the fort. At present, wholesale and retail markets for shoes are spread out inside the gate.

Roshnai Gate-

This is the only gate that has survived with its grandeur intact. It was used by notables, courtiers and the elite to attend court. In the evening, the lights lit here could be seen from the walled city which gave it its name, Roshnai. This gate still remains in its original shape and structure-- a hidden treasure of centuries’ old Mughal grandeur.

“The significance of these gates has been lost with the passage of time,” Meem Seen Butt, a Lahore-based historian, and writer of several books on the city, told Arab News. 

“Now they have heritage value, and are used solely for symbolic purposes.” 


Pakistan ‘used and binned’ by England over canceled tour

Updated 21 September 2021

Pakistan ‘used and binned’ by England over canceled tour

  • The British High Commissioner to Pakistan confirmed the decision was taken on the grounds of player welfare
  • Pakistan’s cricket chief says ‘a little bit of caring was needed after the New Zealand pull out and we didn’t get that from England’

LONDON: Pakistan Cricket Board chairman Ramiz Raja said on Tuesday he felt “used and then binned” after England canceled a white-ball tour for their men’s and women’s teams next month.
The England and Wales Cricket Board (ECB) cited “increasing concerns about traveling to the region” just days after New Zealand also pulled out of a tour to Pakistan over security concerns.
However, the British High Commissioner to Pakistan, Christian Turner, confirmed the decision was taken by the ECB on the grounds of player welfare.
The first trip by the England men’s side to Pakistan since 2005 was only meant to last four days with two Twenty20 matches in Rawalpindi on October 13 and 14.
Two women’s T20 matches were scheduled on the same days as double-headers with three women’s one-day internationals to follow in the same city.
Reaction to the withdrawal in Pakistan has been furious.
Pakistan traveled to England last year at a time when COVID-19 infection rates in Britain were among the highest in the world for a three-match Test and T20 series that saved the ECB millions in television rights deals.
“It’s the feeling of being used and then binned. That’s the feeling I have right now,” Raja told reporters.
“A little bit of hand-holding, a little bit of caring was needed after the New Zealand pull out and we didn’t get that from England which is so frustrating.
“We’ve been going out of our way to meet the international demands, being such a responsible member of the cricketing fraternity, and in return we get a response from ECB saying the players were spooked by New Zealand’s withdrawal. What does that mean?“
New Zealand officials refused to give details of the security threat that forced them to abruptly cancel their matches.
A deadly 2009 attack on the Sri Lanka team bus in Lahore saw Pakistan become a no-go destination for international teams.
In 2012 and 2015 Pakistan hosted England in the UAE, which has staged most of their “home” games since the attack.
A rapid improvement in security in recent years has led to the return of international cricket, with Zimbabwe, Sri Lanka, the West Indies, South Africa and Bangladesh touring in the past six years.
“I share the deep sadness of cricket fans that England will not tour Pakistan in October,” Turner said in a video post on Twitter. “This was a decision made by the ECB, which is independent of the British government, based on concerns for player welfare.
“The British High Commission supported the tour; did not advise against it on security grounds; and our travel advice for Pakistan has not changed.”
The series was supposed to be part of the preparation for England’s men ahead of next month’s T20 World Cup in the United Arab Emirates and Oman.
But many of their star players would now be free to play in the latter stages of the lucrative Indian Premier League, also being hosted in the UAE, should their sides reach the knockout phase.
“You are quoting fatigue and mental tension and players being spooked and a hour-and-a-half flight from here before a World Cup they are quite happy to be caged in a bubble environment and carry on with the tournament,” added Raja.
“One feels slighted, one feels humiliated because withdrawal doesn’t have an answer.”
The ECB’s decision has also been met with fierce criticism at home.
“They had a chance to repay a debt, uphold their honor and side with a cricketing nation that has undergone the kind of challenges others cannot even begin to contemplate,” former England Test captain Michael Atherton wrote in The Times.
“Instead, citing a mealy-mouthed statement, they did the wrong thing.”


PM Khan says Afghanistan’s ‘strong’ women will assert rights under Taliban rule

Updated 21 September 2021

PM Khan says Afghanistan’s ‘strong’ women will assert rights under Taliban rule

  • The Pakistani prime minister says absence of an inclusive government in Afghanistan may lead to a civil war
  • Khan warns the world community that an unstable Afghanistan will be an ‘ideal place for terrorists’

ISLAMABAD: Prime Minister Imran Khan said on Tuesday Afghan women were “very strong” and likely to assert their right under the Taliban rule.
Khan was responding to a question about the rights of women in Afghanistan after the fall of the US-backed Ashraf Ghani administration and the emergence of the Taliban regime during an interview with the BBC.
Women were not allowed to work and girls could not go to school when the conservative Afghan faction came into power between 1996 and 2001.
While the Taliban have said they will not implement their previous policies, they recently closed the Ministry of Women’s Affairs in Kabul and replaced it with the Ministry for Promotion of Virtue and Prevention of Vice.
“Their women are very strong,” the Pakistani prime minister told the British news channel. “I feel give them time and they will assert their rights.”
Asked how much time would be required for that to happen, he said: “A year, two years, three years ... It’s too early to say anything because it has just barely been a month. After 20 years of civil war, they have come back into power.”

A Taliban fighter watches as Afghan women hold placards during a demonstration demanding better rights for women in front of the former Ministry of Women Affairs in Kabul on September 19, 2021. (AFp)

Khan said his biggest worry about the situation in Afghanistan related to a possible humanitarian disaster that could lead to another refugee influx in the region.
He reiterated it was important for the Taliban to form an inclusive government since Afghanistan could witness another civil war if all the factions in the country did not get a stake in its governance and administration.
The prime minister also warned that an “unstable and chaotic Afghanistan” was going to be an “ideal place for terrorists.”


Pakistani exporters complain of high freight charges amid global supply chain disruption

Updated 21 September 2021

Pakistani exporters complain of high freight charges amid global supply chain disruption

  • Global shipping charges have increased by about 500 percent since the outbreak of the coronavirus pandemic
  • Pakistani exporters want the government to activate the National Shipping Corporation to address the situation

KARACHI: Pakistani exporters on Tuesday complained about global supply chain disruption, saying their shipments were becoming more expensive due to the unavailability of containers which was leading to much higher freight charges.
The global supply chain industry is yet to recover from the impact of lockdowns imposed by countries since the emergence of the COVID-19 pandemic.
The container movement primarily become difficult due to the congestion at major ports in countries like the United States and China, resulting in significant rise in shipping costs worldwide.
“Exporters are worried since ships and containers are not available and freight cost has increased manifold,” Jawed Bilwani, chief coordinator of the Pakistan Hosiery Manufacturers and Exporters Association, told Arab News. “The containers that used to be only a phone call away are now made available after 20 days or more which delays our shipments. It also doubles our cost.”
Pakistani exporters said the availability of containers had become a major challenge to their businesses.
“The shipping line business is concentrated in a few hands, and these people are taking full advantage of the prevailing situation,” Khurram Mukhtar, patron-in-chief of the Pakistan Textile Exporters Association, said.
Local exporters informed freight charges had increased by 200 and 500 percent for 40- and 20-foot containers, respectively, since the emergence of the pandemic.
The cost of the 20-foot container from Karachi to the United States has increased from $5,157 to $7,685 since May, while its price for the month of October is quoted at $8,500.
Similarly, the 40-foot container price increased from $6,439 to $9,760 between May and September. The shipping line businesses plan to charge $10,800 for it starting next month.
Pakistani shipping experts believe the situation will not improve anytime soon and may take at least a year to get back to the pre-pandemic level.
“The pressure on global supply chain is mounting and there is no immediate solution in sight,” Mohammed A. Rajpar, chairman of the Pakistan Ships Agents Association, told Arab News.
He said that ships used to complete their full cycle from east to west and west to east in four to six weeks before the COVID-19 outbreak, but this duration went up to three to six months under the current circumstances.
He added that many shipping lines had also stopped their operations worldwide and scrapped their ships.
“New ships have been ordered and that will take at least two years to be delivered. New containers have also been ordered by companies,” Rajpar said.
Amid the aggravating situation, Pakistani exporters said the government should intervene by mobilizing the National Shipping Corporation, the national flag carrier and state-owned shipping company.
“All relevant ministries of the country must immediately intervene by taking necessary measures to safeguard the country’s exports,” the patron-in-chief of the Pakistan Textile Exporters Association said. “The government may dedicate its shipping corporation for export and import purposes for now.”
Pakistani exporters said they had been forced to pay demurrage — a charge applied to containers that are left at the port longer than their allotted free time — for the first time due to the ongoing shipping problems.


Cricketers say UK, NZ pullouts ‘huge setback’ to reviving international cricket in Pakistan

Updated 21 September 2021

Cricketers say UK, NZ pullouts ‘huge setback’ to reviving international cricket in Pakistan

  • England on Monday announced to postpone the Pakistan trip after New Zealand called off its series last week without playing a match
  • The Pakistan Cricket Board says it will seek compensation from New Zealand for recalling the team on the basis of a vague security alert

KARACHI: Pakistani cricketers and sports experts on Tuesday said the announcement by England to postpone its Pakistan tour after New Zealand’s decision to abruptly call off its series without playing a single match was a “huge setback” to the revival of international cricket in the country.
One of the top cricketing nations that lifted world cup trophies in the past, Pakistan regularly hosted test playing teams and international tournaments until a group of militants targeted the Sri Lankan cricket team in Lahore in 2009.
In the coming years, the cricket-crazy South Asian nation was deprived of watching international teams in action in their own country.
“It is a huge setback to the efforts of reviving international cricket in Pakistan,” Umar Gul, a former Pakistani pacer, said while urging the International Cricket Council (ICC) to take notice and prevent teams from taking such unilateral decisions.
Zimbabwe sent its team to visit Pakistan in 2015, though no major cricketing squad visited the country after the 2009 attack.
Some high-profile international players started playing in the country, however, after the launch of the Pakistan Super League (PSL) tournament.
This resulted in a change of international perception regarding Pakistan’s security environment, making international cricket squads like New Zealand and England agree to tour the country after more than a decade.
“The decision of these two teams to abandon their tour of the country will negatively impact Pakistan’s own preparations for the world cup,” Gul told Arab News. “It also has financial implications. Besides, it will harm our efforts to revive international cricket in the country despite making best security arrangements.”

This picture taken on September 7, 2017 shows pigeons resting on a sign for the Pakistan Cricket Board at the Gaddafi Stadium in Lahore, Pakistan. (AFP/File)

A Pakistani sports show host, Shoaib Jatt, called England’s decision to postpone its Pakistan series unjustified while pointing out that his country’s own team had visited the United Kingdom when the tour was considered highly dangerous by medical experts due to the prevalence of COVID-19.
“It is definitely a blow to Pakistan,” he said. “It is not about losing one or two cricket series. We are talking about the revival of international cricket for which a lot of effort has been made.”
Qamar Ahmed, a cricket expert and former first-class player, maintained that PSL had made a huge contribution in bringing back international cricket to Pakistan, though he added the recent refusals of New Zealand and England to play in Pakistan were not going to be helpful.
“It has been more than a decade since the Sri Lankan team came under attack in Lahore,” Ahmed said. “It will take several more years to revive international cricket in this country after the decisions made by New Zealand and England.”
Gul said, however, Pakistan was a resilient nation which would come out much stronger from the recent crisis.
“We have a good world cup team,” he maintained. “If they play well, it may change the situation for us.”
The new chairman of the Pakistan Cricket Board Ramiz Raja recently said in a video message that his country would seek compensation from New Zealand for abandoning its Pakistan tour on the basis of vague security threats.
While New Zealand Cricket (NZC) did not respond to request for comment, its chief executive David White told a sports website in his own country that he was hopeful that Pakistan and New Zealand would be able to “work through” their concerns in the coming days.
“We’ve got a very close working relationship with Pakistan Cricket,” White said.
The English Cricket Board (ECB) shared a statement with Arab News, saying the ECB had a longstanding commitment to tour Pakistan but had postponed its visit after careful deliberations.
“The ECB Board convened this weekend to discuss these extra England Women’s and Men’s games in Pakistan and we can confirm that the Board has reluctantly decided to withdraw both teams from the October trip,” the statement read, adding that the mental and physical well-being of players and support staff remained the highest priority.
However, a leading Pakistani cricketer Muhammad Hafeez pointed out that his own team members had also been playing in tough conditions and under huge mental stress.
“The decision of New Zeeland and England cricket teams to withdraw is very painful for me as a cricketer. We have completed difficult tours where the conditions were not very good at all, but we did not quit,” he told Arab News, adding that the Green Shirts had to complete a 15-days quarantine period during their last tour to England.
“All the hardships are borne for cricket, the gentlemen’s game which demands great sportsman’s spirit. A hoax threat alert should not have been the reason for anyone to call off a series,” he added.


Taliban appreciate PM Khan for playing positive role for Afghan peace

Updated 21 September 2021

Taliban appreciate PM Khan for playing positive role for Afghan peace

  • The Taliban deputy information minister says Kabul is 'heading towards an inclusive government'
  • Zabihullah Mujahid says Pakistan, Qatar and China are striving for Afghanistan's better political future

ISLAMABAD: Afghanistan's deputy information minister and the Taliban spokesperson Zabihullah Mujahid praised Pakistan's Prime Minister Imran Khan's efforts for peace and inclusive government in his country while addressing a news conference in Kabul on Tuesday.

Pakistan has been trying to convince regional countries and other members of the international community to continue their engagement with Afghanistan since the Taliban consolidated their political control in the neighboring state in August.

The Pakistani prime minister informed in his recent Twitter posts he had initiated a dialogue with the Taliban to form a more inclusive administration after a lengthy meeting with Tajikistan's President Emomali Rahmon in Dushanbe last week.

"We do not see the positive statements of Prime Minister Imran Khan as interference in the internal matters of Afghanistan," Mujahid was quoted by Pakistan's Express Tribune newspaper on Tuesday.

"The spokesperson further added that Pakistan, Qatar and China were playing an active role for stability in Afghanistan," said the news report.

Mujahid maintained the cabinet formation was still an ongoing process and the Taliban were "heading towards an inclusive government."

"More people from different ethnicities including Hazaras, technocrats and educated people have been inducted in the interim cabinet. The cabinet formation is not complete yet and more people will also be included in it," he added.

Pakistan's foreign minister Shah Mahmood Qureshi has also reached New York to discuss the situation in Afghanistan at the United Nations General Assembly and urge the world to prevent the economic implosion in the war-battered country since it could lead to a humanitarian disaster.