600,000 Rohingya still in Myanmar at ‘serious risk of genocide’: UN

Rohingya refugees gather behind a barbed-wire fence in a temporary settlement setup in a ‘no man’s land’ border zone between Myanmar and Bangladesh on April 25, 2018. (AFP file photo)
Updated 16 September 2019

600,000 Rohingya still in Myanmar at ‘serious risk of genocide’: UN

  • Some 740,000 Rohingya fled burning villages, bringing accounts of murder, rape and torture from Myanmar
  • UN team says the 600,000 Rohingya still inside Myanmar’s Rakhine state

YANGON: Rohingya Muslims remaining in Myanmar still face a “serious risk of genocide,” UN investigators said Monday, warning the repatriation of a million already driven from the country by the army remains “impossible.”
The fact-finding mission to Myanmar, set up by the Human Rights Council, last year branded the army operations in 2017 as “genocide” and called for the prosecution of top generals, including army chief Min Aung Hlaing.
Some 740,000 Rohingya fled burning villages, bringing accounts of murder, rape and torture over the border to sprawling refugee camps in Bangladesh, where survivors of previous waves of persecution already languish.
But in a damning report, the UN team said the 600,000 Rohingya still inside Myanmar’s Rakhine state remain in deteriorating and “deplorable” conditions.
“Myanmar continues to harbor genocidal intent and the Rohingya remain under serious risk of genocide,” the investigators said in their final report on Myanmar, due to be presented Tuesday in Geneva.
The country is “denying wrongdoing, destroying evidence, refusing to conduct effective investigations and clearing, razing, confiscating and building on land from which it displaced Rohingya,” it said.
Myanmar military spokesman Zaw Min Tun rejected the team’s findings, calling them “one-sided.”
“Instead of making biased accusations, they should go onto the ground to see the reality,” Zaw Min Tun said.


India, China trying to end army standoff in Himalayas

Updated 05 June 2020

India, China trying to end army standoff in Himalayas

  • Indian officials said Chinese soldiers entered the Indian-controlled territory of Ladakh in early May at three different points, erecting tents and guard posts
  • China has objected to India building a road through a valley connecting the region to an airstrip, possibly sparking its move to assert control over territory

NEW DELHI: Indian and Chinese foreign ministry officials on Friday discussed the flaring of tensions on their disputed Himalayan border, where thousands of soldiers from the two countries have been facing off just a few hundred meters (yards) from each other for a month, an Indian official said.
The video conference came a day before generals in the Ladakh region are scheduled to meet at a border post to intensify efforts for a pullback to their pre-May positions in the region. The army officers have held a series of meetings in the past four weeks to break the impasse.
An External Affairs Ministry statement in New Delhi said both sides agreed that they should handle their differences through peaceful discussion "bearing in mind the importance of respecting each other’s sensitivities, concerns and aspirations and not allow them to become disputes.”
Indian officials say Chinese soldiers entered the Indian-controlled territory of Ladakh in early May at three different points, erecting tents and guard posts.
They said the Chinese soldiers ignored repeated verbal warnings to leave, triggering shouting matches, stone-throwing and fistfights.
China has sought to downplay the confrontation while providing little information. Indian media reports say that the two armies have moved artillery guns in the region.
China has objected to India building a road through a valley connecting the region to an airstrip, possibly sparking its move to assert control over territory along the border that is not clearly defined in places.
India and China fought a border war in 1962 and have been trying since the early 1990’s to settle their dispute without success.
In all, China claims some 90,000 square kilometers (35,000 square miles) of territory in India’s northeast, including the Indian state of Arunachal Pradesh with its traditionally Buddhist population. India says China occupies 38,000 square kilometers (15,000 square miles) of its territory in the Aksai Chin Plateau in the western Himalayas, including part of the Ladakh region.