Prince Harry to visit Diana’s Angola land mine project

Britain’s Prince Harry takes part in activities with children at the Khayelitsha Football for Hope project in Cape Town, in 2015. (Reuters)
Updated 06 September 2019

Prince Harry to visit Diana’s Angola land mine project

  • The pictures of Diana wearing protective gear as she walked among red skull-and-crossbone signs in 1997 won vital publicity for the Halo Trust
  • Harry, 34, the queen’s grandson and seventh-in-line to the throne, is a frequent visitor to southern Africa for conservation work and holidays

LONDON: Britain’s Prince Harry will make a poignant visit to Angola this month to visit the land mine clearance project that featured in some of the most famous photographs of his late mother Princess Diana.
The pictures of Diana wearing protective gear as she walked among red skull-and-crossbone signs in 1997 won vital publicity for the Halo Trust which was clearing mines left during Angola’s civil war.
Diana died a few months before the international treaty to ban the weapons was signed later that year.
“(Harry) will visit the location where his mother was photographed. He will see how an area that was a dangerous minefield in 1997 is now a busy street with schools, shops and houses,” Buckingham Palace said on Friday.
Harry, his wife Meghan and their baby son Archie will start their 10-day tour in Cape Town, South Africa, while Harry will also go to Malawi and Botswana at the request of the Foreign Office, the palace added.
The trip will be the first official tour as a family for the Duke and Duchess of Sussex. Meghan, 37, a former US actress, gave birth to Archie, their first child, in May. Archbishop Desmond Tutu will be among the dignitaries the couple will meet during the visit.
Harry, 34, the queen’s grandson and seventh-in-line to the throne, is a frequent visitor to southern Africa for conservation work and holidays.
The trip will take place between Sept. 23 and Oct. 2.


India: No extension of 21-day coronavirus lockdown

Updated 5 min 4 sec ago

India: No extension of 21-day coronavirus lockdown

  • Prime Minister Narendra Modi ordered the country’s 1.3 billion people to remain indoors until April 15
  • India has 1,071 cases of the coronavirus of whom 29 have died, the health ministry said on Monday

NEW DELHI/BENGALURU: India has no plans to extend a 21-day lockdown to slow the spread of the coronavirus, the government said on Monday, as it struggled to keep essential supplies flowing and prevent tens of thousands of out-of-work people fleeing to the countryside.
Prime Minister Narendra Modi ordered the country’s 1.3 billion people to remain indoors until April 15 saying that was the only hope to stop the epidemic. But the order has left millions of impoverished Indians jobless and hungry.
Defying the lockdown, hundreds of thousands of workers who live on daily wages left big cities like Delhi and Mumbai on foot for their homes in the countryside, many with families. They said they had no food or money.
Cabinet Secretary Rajiv Gauba told Reuters partner, ANI, that there was no plan to extend the shutdown beyond the three weeks, rejecting reports that a prolonged closure was likely.
India has 1,071 cases of the coronavirus of whom 29 have died, the health ministry said on Monday. The numbers are small compared with the United States, Italy and China, but health officials say India is weeks away from a major surge in cases that could overwhelm its weak public health system.
Neighboring Nepal, however, announced it would extend its shutdown for another week beginning on Tuesday. The landlocked country has had only five cases of the virus and no deaths, but it is concerned the virus will spread as people start traveling.
“If the lockdown is not extended then the movement of people increases raising the risk of more virus cases,” said Surya Thapa, an aide to Prime Minister K.P. Sharma Oli.
A major concern in India is that the hundreds of thousands of workers going homes will spread the virus deep into the hinterland, said a top health official.
“It’s an evolving situation with daily new challenges coming up like having migratory populations moving from one place to another. Like non-affected states, adjoining affected states,” said Dr. S.K. Singh, director of the National Center for Disease Control, which investigates and recommends control measures for outbreaks.
The government on Sunday ordered authorities in states to stop the migrant workers from moving and to set up shelters on highways where stranded people can get access to food and water until the lockdown is lifted.