Pacquiao polls Twitter on who to fight next

Philippine boxing legend Manny Pacquiao has 2.51 million followers on Twitter and 11.76 million on Facebook. (File/AFP)
Updated 23 March 2019

Pacquiao polls Twitter on who to fight next

  • The poll listed Floyd Mayweather, Keith Thurman, Danny Garcia and Shawn Porter as the choices
  • Pacquaio has 61 wins including 39 knockouts against seven losses and two draws in a 24-year career

MANILA: Philippine boxing legend Manny Pacquiao took to social media to poll millions of fans on who they think should be his next opponent, having brushed off calls to hang up his gloves after turning 40.
“Who should I fight next?” the world’s only eight-division champion asked in a Twitter survey that drew 27,380 votes after five hours and listed Floyd Mayweather, Keith Thurman, Danny Garcia and Shawn Porter as the choices.
The poll, also linked to Pacquiao’s Facebook wall, has 18 more hours to run. It did not indicate how the voting had gone so far.
Pacquiao, who has 2.51 million followers on Twitter and 11.76 million on Facebook, is known to have been angling for a rematch with Mayweather, who beat the Filipino on points in the world’s richest prize fight in 2015.
Pacquiao’s decisive victory over American fighter Adrien Broner in January was supposed to have opened the door to that route. But the unbeaten Mayweather, officially retired, has been non-committal.
Many Facebook users urged Pacquiao, who has 61 wins including 39 knockouts against seven losses and two draws in a 24-year career, to fight Mayweather.
“Floyd of course then retire,” Carlos De Luna Lagunsad added.
But another fan urged the 40-year-old to face International Boxing Federation welterweight champion Errol Spence, who easily beat challenger Garcia in a match between two previously undefeated boxers on Saturday.
“Show this young guys why u r a living legend,” Meg Osh Tin Oniuqa said.


‘King of the road’ rules again as Philippines eases coronavirus lockdown

Updated 03 July 2020

‘King of the road’ rules again as Philippines eases coronavirus lockdown

  • Just 6,000 jeepneys back in business, operating at half capacity under strict social distancing rules
  • First jeepneys were surplus army jeeps left behind by the US military after World War Two

MANILA: Thousands of jeepneys, flamboyantly decorated jeeps that serve as cheap public transport across the Philippines, were back on the streets of Manila on Friday, bringing relief to companies and commuters who have struggled with coronavirus curbs.
Dubbed “the king of the road,” an estimated 55,000 of these large, multi-colored trucks, used to crawl through Manila’s gridlocked roads on a typical day before being forced to a halt 15 weeks ago when the government imposed a coronavirus lockdown.
Just 6,000 were back in business on Friday, operating at half capacity under strict social distancing rules. In pre-pandemic times, jeepneys routinely carried up to 15 passengers who sat knee-to-knee on twin benches in the windowless vehicles, choked by exhaust fumes.
“I’m very happy we are now back on the road. This is our only source of income,” said driver Celo Cabangon, whose truck is decorated with Japanese and Philippine flags, Bible verses and the logo of US sci-fi film “Transformers.”
Under the new rules, passengers must also undergo temperature checks before boarding and shield themselves from one another with face masks and plastic sheets. The Philippines has recorded 40,000 coronavirus cases, and 1,280 deaths.
Commuter Alejandra Carable welcomed the jeepney’s return. “Our expenses are too much without jeepneys. We can save much more now that the jeepneys are back.”
A jeepney fare is typically about 9 pesos ($0.18), cheaper than trains, taxis or motorized tricycles, which were allowed back on the road a month ago when authorities started easing one of the world’s longest and strictest lockdowns.
A phased return to work has been chaotic without jeepneys, with commuters stranded and some companies unable to provide sufficient private transport.
The first jeepneys were surplus army jeeps left behind by the US military after World War Two. Most are festooned with religious slogans or horoscope signs and are in poor shape.