South Korea bans driving BMWs under recall due to fires

Johann Ebenbichler, vice president of BMW for quality, talks about the company’s recall of cars in South Korea. (AFP)
Updated 14 August 2018

South Korea bans driving BMWs under recall due to fires

SEOUL, South Korea: South Korea will ban driving recalled BMWs that haven’t received safety checks following dozens of fires the German automaker has blamed on a faulty exhaust gas component.
South Korea’s Ministry of Land, Infrastructure and Transport said Tuesday the ban taking effect Wednesday affects about 20,000 vehicles.
Drivers cannot use the cars except for taking them to safety checks.
Nearly 40 fires of BMW vehicles this year are suspected to have been caused by engine problems. BMW last month recalled about 106,000 vehicles of 42 different models.
The ministry says 27,000 recalled cars hadn’t received safety checks as of Monday but it expected a portion of them to be checked before the ban goes into effect.


Chinese artificial intelligence company files $1.4 billion lawsuit against Apple

Updated 03 August 2020

Chinese artificial intelligence company files $1.4 billion lawsuit against Apple

  • Xiao-i argued that Apple’s voice-recognition technology Siri infringes on a patent that it applied for in 2004

SHANGHAI: Chinese artificial intelligence company Shanghai Zhizhen Intelligent Network Technology Co., also known as Xiao-i, has filed a lawsuit against Apple, alleging it has infringed on its patents.
The company is calling for $1.43 billion in damages and demands that Apple cease “manufacturing, using, promising to sell, selling, and importing” products that infringe on the patent, it said in a social media post.
Xiao-i argued that Apple’s voice-recognition technology Siri infringes on a patent that it applied for in 2004 and was granted in 2009.
Apple did not respond to a request for comment. Reuters was not immediately available to find a copy of the court filing.
The lawsuit marks the continuation of a row that has been ongoing for nearly a decade.
Shanghai Zhizhen first sued Apple for patent infringement in 2012 regarding its voice recognition technology. In July, China’s Supreme People’s court ruled that the patent was valid.