Saudi Arabia’s localization plan is reshaping consultancy sector - and more beyond

The Kingdom has pioneered telemedicine and e-health services, enabling virtual consultations and remote surgeries to reach the farthest communities. (SPA)
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Updated 19 May 2024
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Saudi Arabia’s localization plan is reshaping consultancy sector - and more beyond

  • Plan a huge opportunity for Saudi Arabia to boost local jobs and reduce its reliance on foreign workers

RIYADH: As Saudi Arabia embarks on a journey aimed at boosting job opportunities for citizens, the localization plan for consultancy professions and businesses plays a crucial role.

In October 2022, the Kingdom’s Ministry of Human Resources and Social Development issued a decision mandating that from the end of March 2024, 40 percent of workers in firms in this sector must be Saudi nationals.

The decision targeted all professions in the sector, most notably financial advisory specialists, business advisers, and cybersecurity advisory specialists, as well as project management managers, engineers, and specialists.

This targeted localization, or Saudization, is part of the cooperation between the Ministry of Human Resources and Social Development and supervising bodies, represented by the Ministry of Finance, the Local Content and Government Procurement Authority, the Expenditure and Project Efficiency Authority, and the Human Resources Development Fund.   

The collaboration aims to elevate the presence of cadres in the sector and boost the percentage of Saudis, contributing to the development of local content in this strategic sector. It also seeks to organize the labor market.

The ministry is meant to support private sector establishments in several ways, including helping them in hiring Saudis by supporting the training and qualification of employees, as well as supporting employment procedures and other initiatives.  

On a similar note, the Local Content and Government Procurement Authority is required to follow up on the commitment to include Saudization requirements in consulting contracts.

It has also issued a guide that clarifies the details of localizing the consultancy sector and professions, and the mechanism of implementing it.  

Reshaping the consultancy sector     

Azeem Zainulbhai, co-founder and chief product officer at talent-on-demand platform Outsized, believes the Saudization rules in the sector will help keep more money in the Kingdom, even though training costs could increase.

“This move means less reliance on experts from abroad in key fields like finance, project management and cybersecurity. Essentially, it’s about creating more jobs for Saudis in important, well-paying sectors and making sure they're trained for these roles,” he told Arab News.

“The end objective is to get better at handling projects and business dealings that are specific to Saudi culture and regulations, stimulate private sector growth, and foster a knowledge-based economy ultimately making companies more efficient and competitive globally,” the co-founder emphasized.

Bashar El-Jawhari, consulting partner at PwC Middle East, also stated that the localization plan initiated by Saudi Arabia marks a significant milestone in reshaping the consulting sector within the Kingdom.  




Azeem Zainulbha, Co-founder and chief product officer at Outsized

“With the launch of the second phase, we anticipate several key transformations that will contribute to the development and empowerment of local talent,” El-Jawhari told Arab News.

“Firstly, as young Saudi professionals enter the workforce, we expect a notable increase in demand for consulting services related to project and transformation management, financial and legal advisory, as well as procurement and supply chain management,” he added.

By having more Saudis in consulting, businesses can better navigate local market dynamics and regulations.

Azeem Zainulbha, Co-founder and chief product officer at Outsized

The consulting partner went on to note that the influx of senior Saudi talent into the consulting industry presents an opportunity for firms to leverage their experience and insights to drive business growth.

Sectors to be affected  

The localization push of course expands beyond the consultancy sector, Zainulbhai noted.

“Tourism and hospitality can really use local insights to attract more visitors and celebrate Saudi culture. Major construction and engineering projects, like the NEOM and the Red Sea Project, will also benefit from having local experts who understand the specific requirements and standards needed,” he said.

The Outsized executive also shed light on the fact that the healthcare, IT, cybersecurity, and renewable energy sectors are all set to improve with more local consultants who bring a deep understanding of regional needs and regulations.

“Local financial experts will be key in adapting to Saudi Arabia’s unique market, especially as it continues to grow and change,” Zainulbhai commented.

Overall, sectors essential to the diversification from oil will see substantial growth and development from this localization.  

“When looking at various sectors, certain areas are poised to benefit more prominently than others. For example, the government and public sectors are likely the first to benefit in light of the transformation journey towards Vision 2030,” El-Jawhari affirmed.

The consulting partner explained that as Saudi Arabia continues its journey toward achieving the ambitious goals outlined in Vision 2030, there is a growing emphasis on enhancing the efficiency and effectiveness of government operations.

“Consulting services play a vital role in supporting this transformation by providing strategic guidance and expertise in areas such as organizational restructuring, process optimization, and performance management,” El-Jawhari commented.

He added: “Furthermore, nationals equipped with experience in operational excellence are well-positioned to contribute to these efforts by implementing measures aimed at optimizing operational processes, reducing costs, and enhancing productivity.”

Potential opportunities

The plan is a huge opportunity for Saudi Arabia to boost local jobs and reduce its reliance on foreign workers, which aligns perfectly with the broader Vision 2030 goals.

“By having more Saudis in consulting, businesses can better navigate local market dynamics and regulations,” added Zainulbhai.

He continued to underscore that local consultants can offer insights that make companies more competitive, especially in sectors where understanding local consumer behavior is crucial.

He also clarified that businesses that follow these new hiring rules may find it easier to onboard government clients.

“The focus on local talent is also great for fostering innovation and could help companies set up successful programs to nurture new ideas in fields like digital tech and sustainability,” Zainulbhai explained.

From El-Jawhari’s point of view, the localization plan presents opportunities for Saudi nationals to enter the consulting profession, contributing to the development of a vibrant knowledge-based economy.

Potential challenges  

While there are many benefits, the plan also brings several challenges. According to Zainulbhai, those include filling talent gaps, adjusting to cultural shifts, and meeting new regulatory standards.

“To tackle these, businesses could set up mentorship programs where seasoned international consultants train up-and-coming Saudi professionals. Setting up special training centers to quickly upskill workers could also help,” the co-founder described.




Bashar El-Jawhari, Consulting partner at PwC Middle East

“There might be some resistance to these changes within companies, so promoting a culture that values diverse perspectives will be important,” he added.

Zainulbhai also believes that consulting with local legal experts will be crucial to stay on top of new regulations.

We anticipate several key transformations that will contribute to the development and empowerment of local talent.

Bashar El-Jawhari, Consulting partner at PwC Middle East

“Although initial costs might be high, businesses can look into government subsidies or focus on tech solutions to reduce long-term expenses and increase efficiency,” he said.

From PwC’s perspective, El-Jawhari said that the availability of fresh, well-educated Saudi graduates provides consulting firms access to junior talent.

“The challenge lies in retaining them beyond the first 4 to 5 years. Government and semi-government entities begin to recruit these nationals, who have gained experience in international consulting firms, to join their workforce,” he stressed.

The consulting partner went on to explain that another challenge is attracting mid-career Saudi consultants who are in high demand and short supply.

“The third challenge is distinct specialties. For example, with the strong drive toward diversifying the economy, there is a need for consulting experience across sectors such as industrial, defense, tourism and culture, sports, and entertainment, supported by international experience,” El-Jawhari revealed.

He further disclosed: “Overall, finding Saudi talent in relatively new sectors of the economy is quite challenging.”

“To expand the pool of mid-career Saudis, a program between government entities and consulting firms could be established. The program could include seconding talented mid-career Saudis into consulting firms for 1 to 2 years,” El-Jawhari clarified.

He wrapped up with this regard saying that this gives consulting firms access to mid-career Saudi talent and in return, government entities gain a mid-career professional equipped with consulting experience.

Vision 2030 implications  

Undoubtedly, this plan provides a key piece of the bigger Vision 2030 puzzle, which aims to diversify the economy beyond oil and boost public services like health and education.

“By increasing Saudi involvement in consulting, the plan helps keep more money in the country and creates high-value jobs that are crucial for modernizing the economy,” Zainulbhai said.

The co-founder also mentioned that it also focuses on upgrading the skills of the Saudi workforce, which is essential for innovation and sustained economic growth.

“More local consultants mean the private sector can grow stronger and more independent, making Saudi Arabia a more appealing place for investors and helping develop key sectors,” he concluded.

On the other side, El-Jawhari shed light on how two key outcomes of Vision 2030 are a thriving economy and a vibrant society.

“Pushing for a higher level of consulting localization will create higher-paid jobs for Saudi nationals, resulting in a more vibrant society that enjoys a higher quality of life,” the consulting partner reiterated.

“Additionally, local talent can provide the necessary expertise in specific consulting services to catalyze economic diversification,” he concluded.

 


Saudi banking sector fuels economic growth and inclusion via digital transformation 

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Saudi banking sector fuels economic growth and inclusion via digital transformation 

RIYADH: The digital revolution within Saudi Arabia’s banking sphere has significantly enhanced the nation’s economic panorama, facilitating effortless financial transactions for customers, experts have told Arab News.

Situated in the heart of the Middle East, the Kingdom stands out not just for its deep-rooted history and cultural legacy but also for its swift embrace of digital advancements, notably within the banking domain.

In recent years, the nation has undergone a significant transformation in its banking sector, propelled by the ambitious Vision 2030 program led by Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman.

This visionary endeavor seeks to broaden the economic landscape, diminish reliance on oil income, and propel the country forward into a new age of prosperity. 

In an interview with Arab News, Saudi-based economist Talat Hafiz set out how the digital transformation has positively impacted the overall economic landscape of the country. 

Hafiz said: “It has allowed (customers) to perform financial transactions and conduct financial businesses related transactions real-time around the clock and year round, which has facilitated  doing business in the Kingdom and in turn have reflected positively on the overall economy, as it has saved time and efforts and ultimately cost reduction to businesses.”

Fabrice Franzen, partner at Bain & Co., told Arab News that the Kingdom has been one of the first countries to avail full digital banking licenses without the need for branches. 

“SAMA (Saudi Central Bank) has actively promoted the digital bank model, and three licenses were issued to local investors and companies, which should go live imminently,” he added.

Franzen anticipated that this should create healthy competition with the traditional players and drive further innovation and enhance customer experience.

Infrastructure and government support

The journey toward digitalization commenced with substantial investments in telecommunications infrastructure. 

This effort positioned Saudi Arabia as a frontrunner in digital regulatory maturity and network speed among G20 nations. 

According to the International Telecommunication Union’s Digital Regulatory Maturity Index, the Kingdom secured the top spot in the Middle East and Africa and ranked ninth among G20 countries. 

Notably, Saudi Arabia stood sixth globally in terms of the fastest data download speed in fifth-generation networks, showcasing its remarkable progress. 

The rise of digital banks and banking solutions

STC Bank was given the go-ahead in 2021. Screenshot

Demonstrating the government’s backing for digital transformation within the banking sphere, the Saudi Cabinet greenlit the licensing of two local digital banks in 2021: STC Bank and the Saudi Digital Bank.

This involved the conversion of stc pay into a local digital bank, now known as “STC Bank,” equipped to conduct banking operations in the Kingdom with a capital of SR2.5 billion ($670 million). 

Furthermore, an alliance of companies and investors spearheaded by Abdul Rahman bin Saad Al-Rashed and Sons Co. established another local facility named the Saudi Digital Bank, with a capital of SR1.5 billion. 

The introduction of the Saudi Arabian Riyal Interbank Express, also known as SARIE – which translates literally from Arabic as “fast” – marked a significant turning point for the digital banking sector in the Kingdom. 

This system not only boosts the efficiency of the national payment infrastructure but also aligns seamlessly with the ongoing developmental trajectory observed within the Kingdom’s payments sector.

According to Hafiz, this system provides the mechanism for all Saudi commercial banks to make and settle payments in riyals. 

The economist added: “It provides the basis for improved banking products and services and is the foundation for the payments system strategy of the Kingdom.” 

Hafiz asserted that SARIE is a “state-of-the-art payment,” as it provides the mechanism for banks to exchange funds transfer and direct debit messages safely and efficiently on behalf of their customers as well as for their own trading purposes. 

SAMA has consistently demonstrated a strong interest in promoting safety and enhancing efficiency within payment systems, aligning with its overarching focus on financial stability, according to the economist. 

As a result, the central bank plays a pivotal role in both the development and operation of payment systems in the Kingdom. 

SARIE, for Hafiz, has undoubtedly represented a significant milestone, profoundly impacting consumer behavior and the operational efficiency of financial institutions across the nation.

Saudi Arabia’s support for fintech companies

The rollout of accelerator programs aimed at bolstering the expansion of emerging fintech companies marked a significant catalyst for the sector’s advancement. 

This initiative was crafted to facilitate the transfer of best practices, tools, and resources to empower emerging firms in the financial technology domain, fostering their growth and amplifying their presence within the Kingdom.

SAMA has been actively supporting the emergence of the fertile fintech scene in Saudi Arabia, providing a wide range of licensing options, according to Bain and Co. 

“Local investors (institutional, family offices) are also actively investing in fintech, providing a healthy flow of seed capital and supporting subsequent capital raises,” the partner told AN.

He added that Saudi fintechs benefit from a sizable domestic market of over 30 million residents, enabling rapid scaling.

Hafiz noted the significance of this program particularly when it comes to supporting new startup fintech companies because such programs are carefully designed to help fintech companies accelerate their growth by providing different services that help them through a fast-track program to scale up their businesses. 

“The national Fintech Strategy goals and objectives are to create 525 Fintech companies in the Kingdom that create 18,000 Fintech job opportunities and contribute SR13.3 billion to the Kingdom’s Gross Domestic Product by 2030,” the economist highlighted.

The Saudi Central Bank has supported the growing fintech scene in the Kingdom. File

Rapid growth in electronic payments

By the end of 2021, the retail sector in the Kingdom witnessed a significant milestone in digital transformation: electronic payments accounted for 57 percent of total transactions, surpassing the target set by Vision 2030, according to data from the central bank. 

Additionally, Saudi Arabia achieved the highest adoption rate of Near Field Communication, NFC, payments, reaching 94 percent, outpacing even nations in the EU, as well as Hong Kong, Canada, and the Middle East and North Africa region.

Financial literacy and inclusion

Financial inclusion in Saudi Arabia aims to provide affordable financial services to all citizens, aligning with government efforts to enhance financial literacy and economic participation. 

This is becoming a major concern for the financial authorities in Saudi Arabia, according to Hafiz. 

He attributed it to the aim of making financial services available to all individuals in the Kingdom at affordable pricing, supporting the government’s efforts connected to raising the financial literacy in the society. 

One of the main goals and objectives of the Financial Sector Development Program – a Saudi Vision 2030 program – is to raise individuals’ financial literacy through proper financial planning and investment.

“Policymakers in Saudi Arabia have implemented robust policies that encourage and ensure the enhancement of financial inclusion, since it has been identified as imperative for economic growth,” Hafiz added.

According to Franzen, the Financial Services Development Program has set an ambitious trajectory to develop the sector as a way to support financial inclusion, literacy, and efficiencies.

“This is benefiting the economy and Saudi citizens as they have enhanced access to cheaper and more secure banking solutions,” he added.

Diverse digital banking ecosystem

The digital banking landscape in Saudi Arabia is vibrant, offering a range of services to cater to evolving consumer needs. 

“With three full digital banking licenses approved, Saudi Arabia is at the forefront of promoting full digital banking solutions – at par with the UAE and well ahead of other GCC (Gulf Cooperation Council) countries,” Franzen said.

He observed that the Kingdom could rely on advanced regulations for biometric customer identification and centralized databases, greatly easing digital onboarding and authentication.

Online banks, neo-banks, challenger banks, and Banking-as-a-Service all play roles in the digital revolution. 

“While neo-banks and challenger banks are still nascent in the market, one should expect that they will drive a higher speed of innovation and will put pressure on traditional players,” Bain and Co. partner emphasized.

“Similar trends have been observed in other markets such as the UK when new digital banks came to challenge the High Street incumbents,” he continued, adding: “This has led to cheaper and more reliable financial services becoming the norm in the UK market (no or very low fees, instant solutions), to the benefit of the customer.” 

According to a report by KPMG, a global network of professional firms providing financial services, neo-banks hold a 20 percent market share in Saudi Arabia’s digital banking sector.

Furthermore, online banks claim 30 percent, while the Banking-as-a-Service segment is projected to reach a market valuation of $7 trillion by 2030, with a yearly growth rate of 26 percent.

Enhanced customer experience

Banks are prioritizing improving customer experience through advanced technologies. AI-driven chatbots offer instant support, and data analytics enables personalized financial advice. These advancements streamline operations and cultivate customer loyalty.

“In Saudi Arabia, 95 percent of people who hold bank accounts and have access to the internet prefer digital over traditional banking channels, such as physical branches and phone banking,” according to a report by Backbase, a Dutch financial technology company.

Bain and Co. partner said that “while customers have grown accustomed to managing their lives from the comfort of their home on their phone (ride-hailing, food delivery, online shopping, home entertainment), they expect a similar service from the banks.”

Franzen added that mobile solutions offer an attractive alternative for those living in remote areas of the Kingdom where branch density is much lower than in the main urban hubs. It also offers cheaper banking solutions for those with lower income.

Future trends and projections

With the rise of pure digital banking entities intensifying their operations, a notable trend is emerging: a surge in account openings, both initially and for secondary accounts, as customers explore branch-less alternatives. 

Franzen said that as confidence in these digital-only players grows, a shift towards them serving as primary banks is anticipated, akin to the trajectory witnessed in countries like the UK, where neo-banks have secured over 25 percent of primary banking relationships.

“One key potential technology unlock to drive digital financial services would be increased flexibility on cloud usage and data residency rules,” he added.


US ready to reopen oil stockpile if petrol prices surge again, FT reports

Updated 17 June 2024
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US ready to reopen oil stockpile if petrol prices surge again, FT reports

BENGALURU: The Biden administration is ready to release more oil from the US strategic stockpile to stop any jump in petrol prices this summer, the Financial Times reported on Monday.

Senior Biden adviser Amos Hochstein told the newspaper that oil prices are “still too high for many Americans” and he would like to see them “cut down a little bit further.”

Hochstein, speaking to the FT said that the US would “continue to purchase into next year, until we think that the Strategic Petroleum Reserve has the volume that it needs again to serve its original purpose of energy security.”

The Energy Department this year has been buying about 3 million barrels of oil per month for the SPR after selling 180 million barrels in 2022 following Russia’s invasion of Ukraine. The move was an effort to curb gasoline prices that spiked to more than $5 a gallon, but it also reduced the reserve to its lowest level in 40 years.

Earlier this month, Energy Secretary Jennifer Granholm told Reuters that the US could hasten the rate of replenishing the SPR as maintenance on the stockpile is completed by the end of the year.


China’s May industrial output misses forecasts, retail sales a bright spot

Updated 17 June 2024
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China’s May industrial output misses forecasts, retail sales a bright spot

BEIJING: China’s May industrial output lagged below expectations with the property sector still weak, adding pressure on Beijing for policy support to shore up growth, but retail sales beat forecasts thanks to a holiday boost, according to Reuters.

The industrial data released on Monday by the National Bureau of Statistics came in below expectations for a 6 percent increase in a Reuters poll of analysts.

However, retail sales, a gauge of consumption, in May rose 3.7 percent on year, accelerating from a 2.3 percent increase in April and marked the quickest growth since February. Analysts had expected retail sales to grow 3 percent due to the five-day public holiday earlier in the month.

Fixed asset investment expanded 4 percent in the first five months of 2024 from the same period a year earlier, versus expectations for a 4.2 percent rise. It grew 4.2 percent in the January to April period.

China’s property market downturn, high local government debt and deflation remain heavy drags on economic activity. The latest figures point to an uneven growth that reinforces calls for more fiscal and monetary policy support.

With narrowing interest margins and a weakening currency remaining key constraints limiting Beijing’s scope to ease monetary policy, China’s central bank left a key policy rate unchanged as expected on Monday.

The world’s second-largest economy grew faster than expected at 5.3 percent in the first quarter, but analysts say the government’s around 5 percent annual growth target is ambitious.

China’s exports grew faster than expected in May helped by improved global demand, but imports growth slowed significantly.

Tepid demand at home has also kept a lid on consumer prices as confidence remains low in the face of a protracted property sector crisis. New bank lending rebounded far less than expected in May and some key money gauges hit record lows.

Property investment fell 10.1 percent year-on-year in January-May, deepening from a decline of 9.8 percent in January-April.

China’s property sector has been hit by a regulatory crackdown and the government has slashed down payment requirements and canceled the floor rate for mortgage interest rate.

The central bank last month announced a relending program for affordable housing to accelerate sales of unsold housing stock.

The job market overall was steady. The nationwide survey-based jobless rate hit 5 percent in May, the same as that in April.

The government has vowed to create more jobs linked to major projects, roll out measures to promote domestic demand targeted at youths and has pledged greater fiscal stimulus to shore up growth. 


Oil Updates – prices slip on weaker US consumer demand, rise in China output

Updated 17 June 2024
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Oil Updates – prices slip on weaker US consumer demand, rise in China output

NEW DELHI: Oil prices slipped in Asian trading on Monday after a survey on Friday showed weaker US consumer demand and as May crude production rose in China, the world’s biggest crude importer, according to Reuters.

Global benchmark Brent crude futures for August delivery were down 40 cents, or 0.5 percent, at $82.22 per barrel at 9:31 a.m. Saudi time. US West Texas Intermediate crude futures for July delivery fell 36 cents to $78.09 a barrel.

The more-active August delivery WTI contract slipped 0.5 percent to $77.7 per barrel.

That followed prices slipping on Friday after a survey showed US consumer sentiment fell to a seven-month low in June, with households worried about their personal finances and inflation.

However, both benchmark contracts still gained nearly 4 percent last week, the highest weekly rise in percentage terms since April, on signs of stronger fuel demand.

“Last week’s robust rally was fueled by forecasts of strong 2024 demand from OPEC+ and the IEA. However, given OPEC’s vested interest in crude oil, there is some skepticism around OPEC’s forecasts,” said Tony Sycamore, a market analyst at IG in Singapore.

“Friday’s soft US consumer confidence numbers suggest that the resilience of the American consumer and the US economy will be tested as households run down their savings to combat higher interest rates and cost-of-living pressures,” he added.

Meanwhile, China’s May domestic crude oil production rose 0.6 percent on year to 18.15 million tonnes, according to data released by the National Bureau of Statistics on Monday.

Year-to-date output was 89.1 million tonnes, up 1.8 percent from a year earlier. National crude oil throughput fell 1.8 percent in May over the same year-ago level to 60.52 million tonnes, with year-to-date totalling 301.77 million tonnes, up 0.3 percent from a year ago.

The country’s May industrial output lagged expectations and a slowdown in the property sector showed no signs of easing, adding pressure on Beijing to shore up growth.

The flurry of data on Monday was largely downbeat, underscoring a bumpy recovery for the world’s second-largest economy.

On the geopolitical front, concerns of a wider Middle East war lingered after the Israeli military said on Sunday that intensified cross-border fire from Lebanon’s Hezbollah movement into Israel could trigger serious escalation.

After the relatively heavy exchanges over the past week, Sunday saw a marked drop in Hezbollah fire, while the Israeli military said that it had carried out several airstrikes against the group in southern Lebanon.

Markets in key oil trading hub Singapore and other countries in the region were closed for a public holiday on Monday.


Air transport industry improves baggage handling despite rising passenger numbers: SITA report

Updated 16 June 2024
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Air transport industry improves baggage handling despite rising passenger numbers: SITA report

RIYADH: Baggage mishandling in the air transport industry has decreased to 6.9 bags per 1,000 passengers in 2023 from 7.6, despite increased passenger traffic, according to a new report. 

According to the latest report from multinational information technology company SITA, this decrease marks a positive trend even as global passenger numbers exceeded pre-pandemic levels for the first time since 2019, reaching 5.2 billion.  

This improvement underscores the industry’s strong adoption of technology, especially in automated baggage handling driven by artificial intelligence and computer vision technologies. 

David Lavorel, CEO of SITA, noted that technology-driven solutions will play a pivotal role in managing the projected doubling of global passenger traffic by 2040.  

He said: “Technologies like these are essential because they help us gather, integrate, and share data effectively. This means we can uncover important insights that make decision-making easier and more automated.”   

Over the years, there has been a 63 percent decrease in mishandling rates from 2007 to 2023, despite a simultaneous 111 percent increase in passenger traffic. However, challenges remain, particularly in managing escalating baggage volumes, SITA said. 

It highlighted that the industry’s focus on digitalization is crucial, with emphasis placed on enhancing data analysis capabilities and implementing automated systems for baggage handling.  

SITA’s research highlighted growing passenger expectations for seamless travel experiences, including self-service options like unassisted bag drops and mobile-enabled journey tracking.  

“Today, 32 percent of passengers rely on bag collection information sent straight to their mobile. Better communication and visibility for passengers will encourage more use of digital self-service and give passengers control over their journey,” SITA said. 

Collaboration between airlines and airports is identified as key to further enhancing baggage handling efficiencies. While data sharing has improved, there is room for enhancement, especially in providing comprehensive, real-time baggage tracking throughout the journey.  

Initiatives like the International Air Transport Association’s Resolution 753 and advocacy from Airports Council International underscore the industry’s commitment to achieving greater transparency and reducing passenger anxiety associated with baggage handling. 

The report highlighted varying trends in baggage mishandling rates regionally, with North America and Europe showing notable declines over the years, attributable to increased investments in infrastructure and technology.  

In contrast, Asia Pacific maintained the lowest mishandling rates globally, reflecting successful digitization efforts despite ongoing recovery challenges. 

In conclusion, SITA’s findings highlight the air transport industry’s resilience and adaptability amid growing passenger demands.  

By continuing to innovate and collaborate, stakeholders can build on these achievements to ensure smoother, more reliable travel experiences for passengers worldwide.