Sultan of Oman marks second anniversary of accession to power

Sultan Haitham bin Tariq al-Said gives a speech after being sworn in before the royal family council in Muscat, Oman January 11, 2020. (Reuters)
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Updated 11 January 2022
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Sultan of Oman marks second anniversary of accession to power

DUBAI: Sultan of Oman Haitham bin Tariq gave a speech on Tuesday on the second anniversary of his accession to power, Al Arabiya TV reported.

Sultan Haitham said the nation has dealt with a number of challenges in the country with “wisdom and patience”.

He also emphasized the significant role the youth can play with their involvement in building the nation, and their effectiveness in contributing to the country's progress.

The sultan also urged for more local investment, and said he looks forward to making the Sultanate a foreign investment destination. 

Sultan Haitham stressed on the importance of the security services and their role in defending the country.

As for the climate changes that Oman was subjected to months ago, he announced that he directed the government to swiftly support the climate early warning system.

 


West Bank village lives in constant fear of Israeli settler raids

Updated 27 sec ago
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West Bank village lives in constant fear of Israeli settler raids

SUSYA, Palestinian Territories: The stress shows on the face of Samiha Ismail, who since Oct. 7 has been stuck in her home in an occupied West Bank village that lives in constant fear of attack by Israeli settlers.

The day after the Hamas raid into southern Israel, settlers entered Susya, a hilltop village in the south of the West Bank, vowing retribution and “humiliation,” the 53-year-old Palestinian recalled.

More than nine months on, Ismail is among 450 inhabitants who spend most of the day indoors. Even their sheep are not allowed out of their sheds.

“Every time we take them to pasture, the settlers chase us,” said the panicked Ismail.

Instead, the sheep of Israeli settlers now dot the nearby hills.

Susya’s inhabitants say their livelihood has gone. 

One international aid group has sent counselors to help Susya residents with their mental health.

“Before the war, we would have defended our land, but today, nobody moves,” she said.

The settlers are armed and protected by the army, she added, and her husband and son have been “beaten up” several times.

Since the start of the Gaza war, Israeli settlement of the occupied West Bank — considered illegal under international law — has hit new records.

Excluding annexed East Jerusalem, some 490,000 Israeli settlers live in the West Bank alongside some 3 million Palestinians.

In June, the Israeli government declared more than 12 sq. km. of the West Bank to be state land, the largest land appropriation since the 1993 Oslo Accords set out the foundations for land use in the territory.

Land that is declared as Israeli state property can be used for more settlements.

In addition, 25 settlement outposts — not even authorized by Israel — have sprung up across the West Bank since the start of the year, according to Peace Now, a settlement watchdog.

Men in military fatigues have meanwhile raided Susya at night, kicking down doors and looting property, including donkeys and mules, locals said.

Some have even entered houses at night to intimidate residents.

“Most of us no longer sleep at night,” Ismail said.

Mohamed Al-Nawajaa, 78, was born before the expulsion of hundreds of thousands of Palestinians when Israel was created in 1948 — known as the Nakba, or catastrophe, to Palestinians.

“After October 7, they took all these hills. We were kicked out in 1948, 1967 ... and again in 2024. But this land is ours,” the shepherd said, his head wrapped in a traditional keffiyeh scarf.

Israel’s offensive has killed at least 39,006 people in Gaza since Oct. 7, according to data from the Health Ministry in the territory.

Since the war erupted, violence has soared in the West Bank, with at least 579 Palestinians killed in violence with settlers or Israeli troops, according to the Palestinian authorities.

At least 16 Israelis, including soldiers, have been killed in attacks involving Palestinians, according to official Israeli figures.

Nawajaa said his biggest concern is his grandchildren. He does not let them leave the house.

He said the settlers had struck him and left him lying on the floor of his house. Others in the village have had similar experiences.

“They come at night, around 3 a.m. They say, ‘this house is mine,’” he said

The harassment has frayed nerves in Susya. The Doctors Without Borders, or MSF, charity set up tent clinics this year due to concerns for the villagers’ mental health.

“There is no doubt that this is the biggest problem here,” said Simona Onidi, an MSF coordinator. 

“We can’t talk about post-traumatic disorder here. It’s never post; it’s a permanent trauma.”

Abdul Rahim Al-Nawajaa is despondent about the future. “The suffering is endless,” said the 60-year-old Bedouin as he pruned his acacia tree, the only one left standing since his olive trees were “vandalized.”

Settlers killed his father a few years ago in a dispute over a sheep and have demolished Abdul’s house “several times.”

“The settlers act in total impunity. A soldier might put a gun to your head, and you can’t do anything,” the shepherd said.

Fears of a new forced exodus stalk Susya. But Mohamed Al-Nawajaa defiantly declared: “We will stay in our houses.”


Iraq hangs 10 convicted of ‘terrorism’: security and health sources

Under Iraqi law, terrorism and murder offenses are punishable by death, and execution decrees must be signed by the president.
Updated 22 July 2024
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Iraq hangs 10 convicted of ‘terrorism’: security and health sources

  • Health official said 10 Iraqis “convicted of terrorism crimes and of being members of the Daesh group were executed by hanging” at Al-Hut prison in Nasiriyah

NASIRIYAH: Iraqi authorities on Monday hanged 10 people convicted of “terrorism,” security and health sources said.
Courts have handed down hundreds of death and life imprisonment sentences in recent years to Iraqis convicted of “terrorism.”
Under Iraqi law, terrorism and murder offenses are punishable by death, and execution decrees must be signed by the president.
A health official said 10 Iraqis “convicted of terrorism crimes and of being members of the Daesh group were executed by hanging” at Al-Hut prison in the southern city of Nasiriyah.
A security source confirmed the executions.
They were hanged under Article 4 of the anti-terrorism law and the health department had received their bodies, the health official told AFP.
The sources spoke on condition of anonymity due to the sensitivity of the issue.
Al-Hut is a notorious prison in Nasiriyah whose Arabic name means “the whale,” because Iraqis believe those jailed there never walk out alive.


Egypt keen to work with partners to find swift solution to Sudan crisis, foreign minister says

Updated 22 July 2024
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Egypt keen to work with partners to find swift solution to Sudan crisis, foreign minister says

  • African Union official praises Cairo during talks in Ghana for its pivotal role in efforts to enhance regional security and stability
  • FM Abdelatty emphasized the need for increased consultation and coordination between member states and the union’s agencies

CAIRO: Egypt earned praise during talks on Monday in Accra, Ghana, for the pivotal role it plays in efforts to enhance security and stability on the African continent.

Bankole Adeoye, the African Union’s commissioner for political affairs, peace and security, said he was keen to continue to coordinate with Cairo on all priority issues related to the bloc.

It came as he held talks with Badr Abdelatty, Egypt’s minister of foreign affairs, emigration and Egyptian expatriates, on the sidelines of the sixth Mid-Year Coordination Meeting of the African Union and the Regional Economic Communities.

They discussed the latest political and security developments in the crisis in Sudan and agreed on the need to unite the country’s civil political forces, preserve national unity and institutions, and coordinate regional and international mediation.

Abdelatty said Egypt was aware of the seriousness of the situation and eager to work with all partners and mechanisms to resolve the crisis swiftly. He stressed the importance of fully involving Sudan in talks about ways to resolve the situation, to preserve “our Sudanese brothers’ ownership of these solutions and proposals.”

The minister welcomed consultations and coordination with the African Union’s commissioner on peace and security in Africa. He said Egypt remains committed to support of the organization and its agencies, and to participation in its Peace and Security Council, in pursuit of peace and stability.

Abdelatty emphasized the need for increased consultation and coordination between member states and the union’s agencies in response to escalating security challenges on the continent, the expanding scope of conflicts and the associated human suffering.

He also outlined Egypt’s agenda and planned activities for its chairmanship of the Peace and Security Council in October. He said its plans prioritize the operationalization of the African Union Center for Post-Conflict Reconstruction and Development, an effort that President Abdel Fattah El-Sisi has led within the union to support countries facing multiple crises.

Egypt welcomed the approval by the Peace and Security Council of a request from the Somali government to extend the time frame for the third phase of the African Union Transition Mission in Somalia, Abdelatty said. He highlighted plans for the deployment of a new mission in the country when the current one expires, and emphasized the need to support the Somali government’s efforts to enhance security and stability.

Adeoye and Abdelatty also discussed other issues of mutual concern, including the Great Lakes issue, the Renaissance Dam, security challenges in the Red Sea, and the situation in the Horn of Africa.


Iran’s Revolutionary Guards intercepted UAE-managed tanker, Ambrey says

Updated 22 July 2024
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Iran’s Revolutionary Guards intercepted UAE-managed tanker, Ambrey says

  • Vessel had loaded marine gas oil off the coast of Iraq and was destined for Sharjah when it was intercepted on Sunday 61NM southwest of Iran’s port of Bushehr

DUBAI: Iran’s Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps (IRGC) have intercepted a Togo-flagged, UAE-managed products tanker carrying 1,500 tons of marine gas oil, British security firm Ambrey said on Monday.
The vessel had loaded marine gas oil off the coast of Iraq and was destined for UAE’s Sharjah when it was intercepted on Sunday 61 nautical miles southwest of Iran’s port of Bushehr, Ambrey said.
Ambrey added that the incident is unlikely to be politically motivated and is not assessed as a ‘war’ event.
The interception was likely a counter-smuggling operation by the IRGC, as the vessel’s “trading behavior was consistent with previous IRGC target profile,” Ambrey said.
Iran, which has some of the world’s cheapest fuel prices due to heavy subsidies and the plunge in the value of its currency, has been fighting rampant fuel smuggling to neighboring countries.
No further information was provided regarding the fate of the vessel.


UN warns Iraq becoming major regional drug conduit

Iraq’s premier Mohamed Shia Al-Sudani attends an anti-drug conference held with regional officials in Baghdad on July 22, 2024.
Updated 22 July 2024
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UN warns Iraq becoming major regional drug conduit

  • “Iraq appears to be at the nexus of regional trafficking routes for both methamphetamine and captagon,” UNODC said
  • Authorities in Iraq regularly announce large seizures of captagon, much of it moved across the border with Syria

BAGHDAD: Iraqi authorities seized record quantities of the potent stimulant captagon last year, at an estimated value of up to $144 million, with the country increasingly a critical drug conduit, a UN report said Monday.
“Iraq has been experiencing a dramatic surge in drug trafficking and consumption for the past five years,” according to a United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) report.
In 2023 alone, authorities “seized a record-high 24 million captagon tablets,” the equivalent of over 4.1 tons, with an estimated “retail value” of between $84 million and $144 million, it said.
“Iraq appears to be at the nexus of regional trafficking routes for both methamphetamine and captagon,” UNODC said, adding that it is “becoming a critical juncture in the complex trafficking dynamics observed in the Near and Middle East region.”
Captagon seizures in Iraq “reportedly tripled between 2022 and 2023, and overall amounts seized in 2023 are 34 times higher than in 2019.”
An amphetamine derived from a once-legal treatment for narcolepsy and attention disorder, captagon today is trafficked through several Middle Eastern countries, with Syria the main country of origin.
Authorities in conflict-scarred Iraq regularly announce large seizures of captagon, much of it moved across the porous 600-kilometer (370-mile) border with war-torn Syria.
According to UNODC, 82 percent of the captagon seized in the region between 2019 and 2023 originated in Syria, followed by neighboring Lebanon, at 17 percent.
Iraq faces an explosion in domestic drug use, with the repeated crises that have gripped the conflict-ridden country of 43 million people driving up usage.
During an anti-drug conference attended by regional officials, Iraq’s Prime Minister Mohamed Shia Al-Sudani called for regional cooperation.
“Coordinating and cooperating to pursue and dismantle drug gangs will serve regional and international security,” he said, adding that “Iraq is open to all cooperation” to fight “cross-border crime.”
“We will support any effort aiming to eliminate drug hubs, manufacturing stations, and cutting off their supply chains.”