Health plan for Hajj was a success, says Saudi minister

1 / 3
Muslim pilgrims pray as they keep social distancing in front of the Kaaba in Makkah, Saudi Arabia on Thursday, July 22, 2021. (AP)
2 / 3
(@HajMinistry)
3 / 3
Workers disinfect the grounds at the Grand Mosque to help protect against the coronavirus in Makkah, Saudi Arabia, Thursday, July 22, 2021. (AP)
Short Url
Updated 22 July 2021

Health plan for Hajj was a success, says Saudi minister

  • “I would like to announce that this Hajj was successful, with neither coronavirus infection nor any other epidemic diseases reported”: Al-Rabiah

JEDDAH: Saudi Minister of Health Dr. Tawfiq Al-Rabiah announced on Thursday that the health plan for this year’s Hajj was a success, with no coronavirus disease (COVID-19) infection cases identified.
“I would like to announce that this Hajj was successful, with neither coronavirus infection nor any other epidemic diseases reported,” he said.
He pointed out that due to the leadership’s interest in maintaining pilgrims’ health and safety, his ministry prepared the Saudi Red Crescent Authority for this year’s Hajj season, through an integral system of health facilities at the holy sites.
This included, he added, several hospitals, health centers and highly-equipped ambulances staffed by medical, technical and administrative personnel.
Al-Rabiah said that all the government agencies participating in serving pilgrims had made great efforts in executing the Hajj health plans to ensure safety, and to prevent any coronavirus infections during this year’s Hajj season, which was downsized to 60,000 vaccinated pilgrims.
He extended his gratitude to King Salman and Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman for their “unlimited support” to the Ministry of Health and its workers, as well as all government authorities and agencies which took part in Hajj.
“I would like to thank the Custodian of the Two Holy Mosques and Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman for their care and keenness to deploy all capabilities in the service of the Guests of Allah and facilitate everything for them to safely and comfortably perform Hajj,” the minister said.
He added he hoped that Allah would accept the pilgrims’ Hajj and reward them, and wished them a safe return to their families.

Related


Saudi navy unveils latest warship Jazan in Spain

Saudi and Spanish officials attend the unveiling of the latest Avante 2200 corvette for the Royal Saudi Naval Forces (RSNF) at the Navantia shipyard in Spain on July 24, 2021. (SPA)
Updated 26 July 2021

Saudi navy unveils latest warship Jazan in Spain

  • The Avante 2200 corvette is the fourth of its type being built in a joint venture between Saudi Arabian Military Industries and Spain's Navantia

MADRID: The Royal Saudi Naval Forces (RSNF) recently celebrated the launch of the Avante 2200 corvette, which is the fourth warship of its type within the Sarwat project.

The ship, named Jazan, was unveiled by the Spanish shipbuilder as part of its ceremonial launching held at the shipyard of the Navantia Naval Industries Co., Spain.

The corvettes are being built in a joint venture between Saudi Arabian Military Industries (SAMI), and Navantia S.A., named SAMI Navantia Naval Industries.

They will be delivered in 2024, a year later than initially planned, and will feature special combat and fire control systems and integrated communications among other technologies.

The launch event was attended by the Saudi ambassador to Spain, Azzam bin Abdulkarim Al-Qain; the vice president of SAMI for corporate communication, support services and information technology, Wael bin Mohammed Al-Sarhan; as well as other senior officials from RSNF, Spanish Navy and SAMI Navantia Naval Industries.

Saudi ambassador to Spain, Azzam bin Abdulkarim Al-Qain, meets with officials of the SAMI Navantia Naval Industries in Spain on July 24, 2021. (SPA)

The commander of the RSNF, Lt. Gen. Adm. Fahd bin Abdullah Al-Ghufaili, said: “The Sarawat project will contribute to raising the level of readiness of the RSNF, enhancing maritime security in the region and protecting the vital strategic interests of the Kingdom. In addition, the project ships are an important addition to the capabilities of the RSNF in protecting the Kingdom’s maritime interests and localizing advanced military industries technically.”

The Sarawat project warships feature the latest combat systems to deal with all air threats, surface and subsurface, as well as being equipped for electronic wars. They have more capabilities than many of the world’s navies, and are a further addition to the capabilities of the RSNF in protecting the nation’s maritime security.

The project also includes training services for crews, training simulators, logistics, and long-term after-sales technical and logistical support.

Related


Who’s Who: Dr. Mohammed Sulaiman Al-Jasser, Islamic Development Bank president

Updated 26 July 2021

Who’s Who: Dr. Mohammed Sulaiman Al-Jasser, Islamic Development Bank president

Dr. Mohammed Sulaiman Al-Jasser has been appointed as the new head of the Islamic Development Bank for the next five years.

He has been an adviser at the General Secretariat of the Saudi Council of Ministers and the chairman of the General Authority for Competition since 2016.

Al-Jasser received his Ph.D. in economics from the University of California in 1986. He obtained his master’s degree in economics from the same university in 1981, and a bachelor’s degree in economics from San Diego State University in 1979.

He served as the Kingdom’s economy and planning minister from 2011 to 2015, and as governor of the Saudi Central Bank (SAMA) between 2009 and 2011. He was also the vice governor and vice chairman of the SAMA’s board from November 1995 to February 2009.

He has participated in major international events, including G20 meetings at the deputy, ministerial, governor and full summit levels. Al-Jasser also participated in regular meetings of the Bank for International Settlements from 1997 to 2011, and took part in local and international symposia, while also giving frequent lectures on economic and monetary policies.

His previous memberships of ministerial committees, boards and councils include the Council for Economic Affairs and Development, the Supreme Council for Civil Defense, and the Ministerial Committee for Mining Affairs among others.

Al-Jasser has received many awards such as the King Abdul Aziz Medal of the First Order in 2001, the Euromoney (Emerging Markets) Award for Central Bank Governor, MENA Region for the Year in 2009, the Arab Bankers Association of North America Achievement Award in 2010, and “The Banker” Award and “Central Bank Governor of the Year for the Middle East” in 2011.


Umrah pilgrims return to Grand Mosque after Hajj 2021

Updated 25 July 2021

Umrah pilgrims return to Grand Mosque after Hajj 2021

MAKKAH: Umrah pilgrims returned to the Grand Mosque to perform the lesser pilgrimage on Sunday after the successful and safe end of Hajj 2021.
Pilgrims will enter the Grand Mosque through specific gates in order to maintain precautionary measures to prevent the spread of COVID-19 and ensure social distancing.
Specific locations have also been allocated for performing prayers and pilgrims will follow markings on the floor when performing tawaf as was seen during Hajj and throughout the coronavirus pandemic.


Saudi Arabia to provide Malaysia with COVID-19 aid including 1 million vaccines

Updated 25 July 2021

Saudi Arabia to provide Malaysia with COVID-19 aid including 1 million vaccines

  • Hussein: This “truly symbolizes the sincerity of the Saudi Arabian Government in making friendship with Malaysia”
  • The aid includes 1 million doses of a COVID-19 vaccine, medical equipment and personal protective equipment

RIYADH: Saudi Arabia announced on Sunday that it will provide Malaysia with medical equipment and supplies after a surge in coronavirus cases in the country.
Saudi Arabia’s king directed the King Salman Humanitarian Aid and Relief Center (KSRelief) to provide the aid after Malaysian Foreign Minister Hishammuddin Hussein requested assistance to fight COVID-19 during a call with Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman.
The aid includes 1 million doses of a COVID-19 vaccine, medical equipment and personal protective equipment.
The General Supervisor of KSRelief, Dr. Abdullah bin Abdulaziz Al-Rabeeah, said the aid is an affirmation of the humanitarian role played by the Kingdom toward the countries most affected by the coronavirus pandemic and the depth of the strong relations between Saudi Arabia and Malaysia.
Al-Rabeeah said KSRelief will coordinate with Hussein’s office to expedite contracts with an approved international company to supply the required quantities of vaccines directly from its factories to Malaysia.
Hussein thanked King Salman in a Facebook post and said “This is a great honor and truly symbolizes the sincerity of the Saudi Arabian Government in making friendship with Malaysia.”
Malaysia’s total coronavirus cases since the start of the pandemic surpasssed 1 million on Sunday after the country’s health ministry reported a record 17,045 new coronavirus cases.

Related


Car enthusiast puts her fellow Saudi women in the driving seat

Times have changed in Saudi society and gender is no longer the barrier it once was to pursuing a career in previously male-dominated fields such as the automobile industry. (Supplied)
Updated 25 July 2021

Car enthusiast puts her fellow Saudi women in the driving seat

  • Nada Hambazaza aims to pass on what she has learned about cars to the Kingdom’s newly empowered female drivers

JEDDAH: Trying to choose the perfect car can be a confusing and intimidating experience for anyone, but especially new drivers. Dealing with the problems that come with car ownership can be even more vexing.
With a growing number of women getting behind the wheel in Saudi Arabia, one Saudi woman is on a mission to teach them what lurks under the hood so that they are better able to choose a vehicle that suits them and keep it running well.
In 2018 women in the Kingdom were officially given permission to drive, empowering many to take to the road for the first time. For many new drivers, however, trying to decide which vehicle is best can feel like a leap into the unknown, to say nothing of the stress and confusion when basic mechanical problems arise.
Nada Hambazaza, a public relations manager at an automotive and marketing agency in Jeddah, grew up with a love of cars and decided she wanted to learn how they work. This ultimately inspired her to launch a YouTube channel to teach other women about cars, and now she plans to take the next step by providing some basic lessons on maintenance and repairs.

HIGHLIGHTS

• In 2018 women in the Kingdom were officially given permission to drive, empowering many to take to the road for the first time. For many new drivers, however, trying to decide which vehicle is best can feel like a leap into the unknown, to say nothing of the stress and confusion when basic mechanical problems arise.

• Nada Hambazaza’s YouTube channel, the Arabic name of which translates as ‘for safer driving,’ provides content in Arabic for an Arab audience.

• Hambazaza has more than 15 years of experience working in office management and public relations. She said her mission with her YouTube channel is to ensure women are capable of looking after their vehicles themselves without needing any help for basic maintenance.

“I have had a passion for cars since I was a kid,” she told Arab News. “I used to see my family members taking care of their cars and I spent a lot of time with them. So I understand more than most females, at least in the terminologies related to cars.

Nada Hambazaza launched a YouTube channel to teach other women about cars, and now she plans to provide some basic lessons on maintenance and repairs. (Supplied)

“Learning is a nonstop journey; I always keep educating myself through web searches and watching related material to advance my knowledge.”
Hambazaza’s YouTube channel, the Arabic name of which translates as “for safer driving,” provides content in Arabic for an Arab audience.
“I’m not by any means a mechanic but I know basic maintenance,” she said. “Different people have different thoughts — you don’t have to physically work on the car yourself, but at least gain the knowledge and delegate the physical work to a specialist.
“You can be sure that there are some tasks that can be done easily by yourself without the need for a mechanic’s help; just a little knowledge can get the job done.”
Hambazaza has more than 15 years of experience working in office management and public relations. She said her mission with her YouTube channel is to ensure women are capable of looking after their vehicles themselves without needing any help for basic maintenance.

Learning is a nonstop journey; I always keep educating myself through web searches and watching related material to advance my knowledge.

Nada Hambazaza

“The main purpose of the program is to spread awareness, mainly to new drivers, so that they get to know more about their vehicle, the main parts and how they are structured, in addition to knowing how to handle certain situations,” she explained. In addition, viewers can send their questions about specific scenarios or issues for Hambazaza to answer.
Her short videos aim to be informative and easy to understand, she said, and to provide Saudi women with information in a simple and engaging way that will appeal to new and experienced drivers alike who might lack important, basic knowledge that could make their motoring lives easier.
In addition to the backing of her husband and family, Hambazaza said she has received support and positive feedback from other people, which helped ease her initial fears about how her videos would be received.
“I was a bit nervous in the beginning, thinking I would receive tons of comments about how girls can’t work on cars,” she said. “But the overall reaction has been very supportive and my close circle of friends and family is pushing me to do more and encouraging me to continue.”
Times have changed in Saudi society and gender is no longer the barrier it once was to pursuing a career in previously male-dominated fields such as the automobile industry.
“Underestimating women getting into this field is no longer applicable to today’s world,” Hambazaza said. She encouraged girls and young women always to pursue their passions, and added that if they find their dream job in the automotive industry “don’t allow anything to pull you back — follow your dreams.”