Coronavirus violations blamed for Pakistan death rise

A resident walks past a closed restaurant after been sealed by authorities for violating COVID-19 prevention guidelines in Karachi on Oct. 2, 2020. (AFP)
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Updated 20 October 2020

Coronavirus violations blamed for Pakistan death rise

  • Pakistan’s big cities could face a second wave of COVID-19 in the coming weeks because of increasing pollution in winter

ISLAMABAD: A Cabinet minister says Pakistan has witnessed a 140 percent increase in fatalities from COVID-19 in recent weeks due to widespread violations of social distancing rules.
Asad Umar, the planning and development minister who oversees Pakistan’s response to coronavirus, warned on Twitter “We will lose both lives and livelihoods” if people did not adhere to social distancing rules.
His comments Tuesday came shortly after the military-backed Command and Operations Center reported 14 deaths and 625 new cases in the past 24 hours.
Prime Minister Imran Khan had warned on Monday that Pakistan’s big cities could face a second wave of COVID-19 in the coming weeks because of increasing pollution in winter. Pakistan has reported 324,084 cases, including 6,673 COVID-19 deaths.


UK PM names Nadhim Zahawi as minister responsible for vaccine deployment

Updated 28 November 2020

UK PM names Nadhim Zahawi as minister responsible for vaccine deployment

  • Zahawi will report to health minister Matt Hancock in his new role
  • His primary focus will be vaccine deployment although he will keep some of his business responsibilities

LONDON: British Prime Minister Boris Johnson has named Nadhim Zahawi, currently a junior business minister, as the minister responsible for COVID-19 vaccine deployment, in a sign that the government is readying a mass vaccination program.
Zahawi will report to health minister Matt Hancock in his new role, with his primary focus on vaccine deployment although he will keep some of his business responsibilities.
A statement from the Prime Minister’s office on Saturday added that the new arrangement was temporary and would last until at least next summer.

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