What We Are Reading Today: Who Gets In And Why by Jeffrey Selingo

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Updated 20 September 2020

What We Are Reading Today: Who Gets In And Why by Jeffrey Selingo

For anyone interested in how decisions are made about admissions to the top-ranked colleges and universities in the US, Jeffrey Selingo’s Who Gets In And Why is for them. 

“Money talks and privilege walks. In the case of college admissions, it saunters through wrought-iron gates, past signs emblazoned with ‘Welcome Class of’ and into seats at convocation,” Anthony Abraham Jack said in a review for The New York Times. 

Timely and engaging, Who Gets in and Why details “how college admission is rigged in favor of the privileged and how it came to be gamed even further,” said the review. 

“Through revealing interviews with industry leaders and observations of admissions committee deliberations at three schools, Selingo unpacks the myriad ways that colleges’ desperate attempts to climb up in the rankings further open doors to students from more affluent families,” the review added. 

“Universities want to raise their profile, knowing that selectivity is a key measure in rankings. They also want to lock in their full payers early, a desire that may only grow stronger as colleges grapple with budget deficits brought upon by COVID-19,” the review said.


What We Are Reading Today: Billion Dollar Loser by Reeves Wiedeman

Updated 25 October 2020

What We Are Reading Today: Billion Dollar Loser by Reeves Wiedeman

The subject of billion dollar Loser, reeves wiedeman’s indefatigable, scrupulous account of the dubious co-working-space company wework, is adam neumann — the co-founder who eventually all but wrecked it.

Culminating in a day-by-day account of the five weeks leading up to wework’s botched ipo and neumann’s dramatic ouster, wiedeman exposes the story of the company’s desperate attempt to secure the funding it needed in the final moments of a decade defined by excess.

Neumann had two great ambitions when he was young: To grow wealthy and to save the world. Neumann believed his two goals could be folded into one and pursued by the same methods: brash self- promotion, florid salesmanship and an impulsive management style reflective of what he considered to be his own genius.

Walter Kirn said in a review for the new York times: “Citing an interview from april 2019, not long before wework’s unraveling, wiedeman describes neumann as engaged in a belated campaign to polish his image and raise one of many rounds of outside cash to replace the vast sums he’d already dissipated.”