Qatari government entities must cut foreign staff costs by 30%

Qatar has directed ministries and all other government and public entities to reduce costs for non-Qatari employees by 30% as of June 1. (File/AFP)
Short Url
Updated 11 June 2020

Qatari government entities must cut foreign staff costs by 30%

  • Non-Qatari government employees would be given a two-month grace period if they were terminated
  • Expatriates make up the majority of Qatar’s population

DUBAI: Qatar has directed ministries and all other government and public entities to reduce costs for non-Qatari employees by 30 percent as of June 1, either via pay cuts or lay-offs, a finance ministry document seen by Reuters showed.
The document also outlined other cuts affecting Qatari employees, including to benefits, which come as the world’s top liquefied natural gas exporter feels the bite of a global coronavirus downturn that has sapped energy demand.
Expatriates make up the majority of many Gulf states’ populations, including in tiny Qatar, where the workforce of everything from its banks to airlines are filled out by foreign nationals.
Qatar has been pushing to nationalize much of its labor force, a task complicated by a national population of just roughly 300,000.
The government did not immediately respond to a request for comment.
Non-Qatari government employees would be given a two-month grace period if they were terminated, the document said.
For Qatari employees, cash allowances in lieu of holidays would cease, as would advance payments except for marriages, the document said.
The ministry also said the office of the prime minister must be notified if a government entity wished to retain an employee after they reach the age of 60.
As of June 11, Qatar had registered a total of 75,071 coronavirus cases.


Lebanon’s parliamentary blocs to help Hariri form new government

Updated 23 October 2020

Lebanon’s parliamentary blocs to help Hariri form new government

  • Lawmakers emphasize need to expedite reform process
  • Parliamentary blocs that met Hariri expressed a sense of optimism and cooperation

BEIRUT: Lebanese Prime Minister-designate Saad Hariri on Friday held consultations with lawmakers about the new government he will form.
He held the non-binding meetings at the parliament’s headquarters despite the damage it suffered after the Beirut Port explosion on Aug. 4.
There were tough security measures at entrances leading to parliament and there were no protests nearby, despite activists’ anger about Hariri’s nomination to lead the country. He resigned a year ago as prime minister following massive demonstrations against Lebanon’s political elite. 
“Hariri is sticking to forming a government of non-party member specialists whose mission is to implement economic, financial, and administrative reforms as cited by the French initiative, which the parliamentary blocs vowed to support,” sources close to Hariri told Arab News. “Hariri listened to the points of view of the lawmakers, noting that since his nomination he has not talked to anyone about details related to the government which he intends to form.”
Parliamentary blocs that met Hariri expressed a sense of optimism and cooperation, especially those that did not nominate him on Thursday to form the government. Representatives of these blocs were unanimous in emphasizing the importance of speeding up the reform process to save the country from its economic crisis.
“Talks were straightforward and open,” lawmaker Gebran Bassil said after his meeting. “There is no personal problem with Hariri and we are extremely positive, and we are concerned in implementing the reforms cited by the French proposal.”
He asked that reforms start with a forensic investigation and the imposition of capital control, and to agree on a joint program with the International Monetary Fund (IMF).
“The priority is for qualified people and we wait for what President Michel Aoun and Hariri will agree on, so that we determine our stance toward forming the government, noting that we are ready to facilitate the process.”
Lawmaker Mohammed Raad, head of Hezbollah parliamentary bloc, said after his Hariri meeting: “We tendered our point of view regarding the role of the government, and this is something that we consented on to a large extent. We discussed reform issues related to administration, the judiciary, and control agencies, calling for rectifying the financial and banking situation, in addition to other issues cited in the French initiative which we vowed to support 90 percent of them. We advised to adopt a method whereas each minister would hold one portfolio so that he would be capable of sorting out its problems. We advised not to have a small government, and to have between 22 and 24 ministers, and expressed our readiness to cooperate.”
Former Prime Minister Tammam Salam said he hoped that the government would be formed by a harmonious team to implement the required reforms during a three to six month period. “Parliament is there to question and hold accountability, in addition to follow up all government actions, and this cannot be achieved during this period in a traditional way as if things are all fine in the country.”
Dr. Nasser Yassin said that the spirit of openness and cooperation after a period of acrimony and accusation was about maintaining a minimum level of stability in Lebanon within the framework of the French initiative.
“The collapse of Lebanon affects neighboring countries, and we have already seen refugee boats sailing in the direction of Cyprus,” he told Arab News. “Nobody wants to increase the crises of the region, the crises of Syria, Iraq, Yemen, and Libya are enough, and what is needed is to maintain a minimum stability in Lebanon. I do not see new equations.”
He added that what was happening in Lebanon was the failure of some in leading the country, the attempts of some parties to undermine the role of other parties, and the game to save the political order while maintaining the same political behavior.