Chevron gets three months for Venezuela operations

Venezuela has some of the world’s largest oil reserves, but has come under heavy pressure from Washington in an effort to oust President Nicolas Maduro. (Shutterstock)
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Updated 19 January 2020

Chevron gets three months for Venezuela operations

  • Oil giant to maintain loss-making operation despite heavy US import tariffs on Caracas

CARACAS: The US Treasury Department on Saturday granted permission for Chevron Corp, the last major US oil company operating in Venezuela, to continue working in the country until April 22.

The US imposed sanctions last year that barred imports of Venezuelan oil and transactions made in US dollars with Venezuela’s state-run oil company PDVSA, in move a designed to starve Caracas of oil dollars and oust President Nicolas Maduro.

The restrictions cut Venezuela’s oil exports by 32 percent last year, but Maduro has remained in power, supported by PDVSA and the country’s military.

Chevron and oilfield service firms Baker Hughes, Halliburton, Schlumberger, and Weatherford International have regularly received permission to remain in the country. The four oilfield service firms have largely ceased operations there.

The extension was a win for some Trump administration officials, including Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, who see value in keeping the company in Venezuela, which has the world’s largest reserves of oil.

Chevron has been in Venezuela for nearly a century and has kept about 300 direct employees there through years of turmoil. The company’s Venezuelan oil and gas production has been falling and was about 32,000 barrels per day during the most recent quarter for which figures were available.

A Chevron spokesman declined  to comment, whilst representatives for Baker Hughes, Halliburton and Schlumberger were not immediately available.

The company posted a $104 million loss on its Venezuela operations for the nine months ended Sept. 30, 2019. It would lose about $2.7 billion in assets if required to leave the country, Chevron said.

A 1 million-barrel cargo of Venezuelan crude consigned to Chevron was scheduled to load this month at Venezuela’s Jose port, according to internal PDVSA documents seen by Reuters.

The operation does not violate sanctions, and proceeds from the oil export are used by a joint venture to cover maintenance costs, Chevron said.

The Treasury Department said the license extension did not authorize transactions related to shipments of diluents, which Venezuela needs to thin its heavy oil for processing.

The US Treasury also issued a further license on Saturday, allowing transactions related to PDVSA’s 2020 bond, which is backed by shares in US refiner Citgo Petroleum Corp. The new license will take effect from April 22, replacing a previous license that last year had authorized transactions from Jan 22. 


NMC Health removes CEO amid investigation of UAE firm’s finances

Updated 27 February 2020

NMC Health removes CEO amid investigation of UAE firm’s finances

  • Chief Executive Prasanth Manghat was dismissed with immediate effect
  • Chief Operating Officer Michael Davis was appointed as interim CEO

NMC Health has removed Chief Executive Prasanth Manghat with immediate effect and granted its finance chief extended sick leave, as more details emerge from an investigation into the UAE health care firm’s finances.
Abu-Dhabi based NMC said after Wednesday’s market close that it had appointed Chief Operating Officer Michael Davis as interim CEO to succeed Manghat and said Chief Financial Officer Prashanth Shenoy had been placed on longer leave.
Manghat had been with NMC for about 10 years in various roles, including deputy CEO and CFO, and had seen the company through its 2012 listing on the London Stock Exchange.
The moves are the latest blow for the firm whose shares have lost about two thirds of their value since US-based short-seller Muddy Waters late last year questioned its financial statements.
NMC had said at the time that the report was “false and misleading,” but had opened its own investigation into company finances. The review is being led by Louis Freeh, who was director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation in the United States from 1993 to mid-2001.
NMC on Wednesday said the investigation committee had identified supply chain financing arrangements that were entered into by the company and “which are understood to have been used” by entities controlled by founder BR Shetty and former vice-chair Khaleefa Butti Omair Yousif Ahmed Al Muhairi.
Reuters was unable to reach Manghat, Shetty and Muhairi for comment outside business hours on NMC’s latest statement.
The company, which operates clinics and hospitals, specialized maternity and fertility clinics, and long-term care homes in 19 countries, said the committee was reviewing a drawdown of its facilities that had not been disclosed or approved by the board.
Its shares closed 6.6% higher before Wednesday’s statement.
NMC also said it had suspended a member of its treasury team over possible discrepancies in its bank statements and ledger entries, and said it would be unable to publish its annual results till at least the end of April.
Indian billionaire Shetty resigned as NMC’s co-chairman this month, after British regulators said they were looking into NMC following a disclosure that he had misstated the size of his stake.
Shetty had said this month that his NMC shareholdings were under a legal review looking into a large portion of his shares signed to two of NMC’s top investors in 2017, while some of his other stock had been pledged as security against loans.