As pollution plagues Delhi, calls grow to shut schools and axe sport events

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A man paddles a home-made boat across Yamuna river on a smoggy afternoon in the old quarters of Delhi, India, October 30, 2019. (Reuters)
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Commuters drive along a road under heavy smog conditions in New Delhi on October 30, 2019. (AFP)
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Humayun's Tomb is seen under heavy smog conditions in New Delhi on October 30, 2019. (AFP)
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Birds fly next to electricity pylons on a smoggy afternoon in the old quarters of Delhi, India, October 30, 2019. (Reuters)
Updated 30 October 2019

As pollution plagues Delhi, calls grow to shut schools and axe sport events

  • Farm fires raging in neighboring states have sent clouds of smoke floating over the city
  • The CPCB air quality index has exceeded 400, classified as “severe” on the scale

NEW DELHI: Some doctors and residents urged New Delhi authorities to shut schools and cancel outdoor sporting events in the Indian capital as air pollution remained at the most severe level for the second day running on Wednesday.
Farm fires raging in neighboring states have sent clouds of smoke floating over the city, trapped in a toxic smog, posing a health risk to its 20 million residents, according to the Central Pollution Control Board’s (CPCB) air warning guidance.
The CPCB air quality index has exceeded 400, classified as “severe” on the scale, which means it can seriously affect those with existing respiratory illnesses, and even those who are healthy. Pollution readings in some places had peaked at 500, the most severe level on the government index.
“It is a public health emergency,” said Desh Deepak, a chest physician at the city’s Ram Manohar Lohia Hospital.
“Today, lungs are far blacker compared to 20 years ago.”
Some citizens’ groups and doctors took to Twitter to call for schools to be temporarily closed until the air quality improved.
Former India cricket captain Bishan Singh Bedi, meanwhile, led a chorus of warnings over Delhi hosting a limited-overs Twenty20 cricket match between India and Bangladesh on Sunday, citing “hazardous air quality.”
But match organizers at the Delhi & District Cricket Association announced the sale of tickets on Wednesday in a sign they were pressing ahead.
Delhi’s chief minister Arvind Kejriwal said: “I hope that pollution will not come in the way of cricket.”
Some residents also called for the cancelation of a 6 km run planned for Thursday to mark the anniversary of the birth of former home minister Sardar Patel, revered by ruling Hindu nationalists.
“You will be putting thousands of citizens in harm’s way by making them run in this pollution,” posted Brikesh, a Twitter user.
The CPCB index measures the concentration of tiny poisonous particulate matter that can be carried deep into the lungs, causing deadly diseases including cancer and cardiac problems.
“We are in a severe situation because there are no winds,” Prashant Gargava, a top official at the CPCB told Reuters.
The city government has ordered the shutdown of construction activities and coal-based power plants. From next week, Delhi will restrict the use of private vehicles on the capital’s roads under an “odd-even” scheme based on vehicle number plates.


World’s biggest literature festival kicks off in Jaipur

Updated 35 min 13 sec ago

World’s biggest literature festival kicks off in Jaipur

  • Economist and Nobel laureate Abhijit Banerjee will attend the event

JAIPUR: The 13th edition of the Jaipur Literature Festival (JLF) started on Thursday.

Known as the “greatest literary show on earth,” the five-day event brings to one venue more than 500 speakers of 15 Indian and 35 foreign languages, and over 30 nationalities.

Among the festival’s participants are Nobel laureates and Pulitzer Prize winners.

The event has been expanding, with over 400,000 people attending it last year and even more expected to show up this time.  The growing crowd has made the medieval Diggi Palace, which hosts it, look small, and organizers are planning to shift the event to a bigger venue next year.

Scottish historian and writer William Dalrymple, one of the organizers, said: “The first time we came to the Diggi Palace in 2007, 16 people turned up for the session of which 10 were Japanese tourists who walked out after 10 minutes, as they had come to the wrong place. Things have improved a little since then. We are now formally the largest literature festival in the world.”

Dalrymple, who has extensively written on medieval India and South Asia, has played a pivotal role in promoting the festival.

The other two organizers are its director, Sanjoy K. Roy, and writer Namita Gokhale, who along with Dalrymple made the JLF become one of the most sought-after events in India.

“Why has the literary festival taken off in this country in this extraordinary way? It goes back to the tradition of spoken literature, the celebration of literature orally through the spoken word has deep roots in this country,” Dalrymple said.

“So the idea that a literary festival is a foreign import is something that can’t be maintained. We’ve tapped into something very deep here. Literature is alive and is loved in India,” he said.

Inaugurating the festival’s 13th edition, celebrated British mathematician Marcus du Sautoy said: “Every number has its own particular character in the story of mathematics. For me it is 13; 13 is a prime number, an indivisible number, and the JLF is certainly a festival in its prime.”

The festival this year is taking place amid a raging debate about India’s new citizenship legislation and mass agitation on the issue of preserving the secular fabric of the nation.

Reflecting on the prevailing mood in the country, Roy, in his opening remarks, said: “We are now faced with a situation where we see a spread of the narrative of hatred. Literature is the one thing that can push back against it and so can be the arts. All of us have a responsibility to do so and this is not the time to be silent anymore.”

Gokhale said: “Ever since its inception 13 years ago, we at the Jaipur Literary Festival have tried to give a voice to our plural and multilingual culture. We live in a nation which is defined by its diversity, and it is our effort to present a range of perspectives, opinions, and points of view, which together build up a cross-section of current thinking.”

She added: “We seek mutual respect and understanding in our panels — it is important to us that these often conflicting ideas are respectfully presented and heard. We also resist predictable and self-important all-male panels, and try to ensure that the vital voices of women resonate through all aspects of our programming.”

One of the attractions of the event this year is the presence of Nobel laureate Abhijit Banerjee, who won the prize in economics last year.

There are also panel discussions on Kashmir, the Indian constitution and history.

The prevailing political situation in South Asia is also reflected by the absence of Pakistani. Before, popular Pakistani authors would attend the JLF, but delays in visa issuance and a hostile domestic environment forced the organizers to “desist from extending invitations.”