BP taps insider Bernard Looney as CEO, Dudley to leave in 2020

Bob Dudley was appointed to the top job in 2010 following the Deepwater Horizon disaster in the Gulf of Mexico. (Reuters)
Updated 04 October 2019

BP taps insider Bernard Looney as CEO, Dudley to leave in 2020

  • Bob Dudley was appointed to the top job in 2010 following the Deepwater Horizon disaster in the Gulf of Mexico

British oil major BP said on Friday upstream business head Bernard Looney will succeed Bob Dudley as chief executive officer when he retires next year after holding the role for nearly a decade.
Looney joined BP in 1991 as a drilling engineer, and took over as the head of the group’s oil and gas exploration, development and production business worldwide in April 2016.
Dudley, who was appointed to the top job in 2010 following the Deepwater Horizon disaster in the Gulf of Mexico, will leave after the company’s full-year results on Feb. 4 next year, BP said.
He has led the company through near-bankruptcy after it caused the largest oil spill in US history and an oil price crash.
“As the company charts its course through the energy transition this is a logical time for a change,” BP Chairman Helge Lund said in a statement.


Germany mulls how to attract skilled labor from outside EU

Updated 56 min 3 sec ago

Germany mulls how to attract skilled labor from outside EU

  • The new legislation will take effect March 1
  • German official said shortage of skilled workers is currently biggest risk to business

BERLIN: Chancellor Angela Merkel is meeting top German business and union officials on Monday to discuss how to attract skilled workers from outside the European Union as the country tries to tackle a shortfall of qualified labor.
Legislation is due to take effect March 1 making it easier for non-EU nationals to get visas to work and seek jobs in Germany. Arrangements currently applied to university graduates are being expanded to immigrants with professional qualifications and German language knowledge.
“Many companies in Germany are urgently seeking skilled workers, even in times of a weaker economy,” Eric Schweitzer, the head of the Association of German Chambers of Commerce and Industry, told the Funke newspaper group. “For more than half of companies, the shortage of skilled workers is currently the biggest risk to business.”
He called for “unbureaucratic and effective implementation” of the new legislation.
Sectors including information technology and nursing have complained of a shortage of workers.
Monday’s meeting will discuss which countries German business wants to focus on “and we will cut out the bureaucratic hurdles,” Labor Minister Hubertus Heil told RBB Inforadio. He named as examples the process of recognizing professional qualifications, language ability and visa procedures.
Like many other European countries, Germany is trying to strike a balance between the needs of its labor market, an aging native population and concern about immigration.
Heil said that the aim isn’t to undercut German wages and “our problem at the moment is rather that we are not being overrun, that we are not getting qualified workers.”