China’s August exports unexpectedly shrink, imports remain weak

Many analysts expect China’s export growth to slow further in coming months. (AFP)
Updated 08 September 2019

China’s August exports unexpectedly shrink, imports remain weak

  • Beijing is widely expected to announce more support measures in coming weeks to avert the risk of a sharper economic slowdown
  • There were expectations that looming tariffs may have prompted some Chinese exporters to bring forward or ‘front-load’ US-bound shipments into August

BEIJING: China’s exports unexpectedly fell in August while imports shrank for a fourth month, pointing to further weakness in the world’s second-largest economy and underlining a pressing need for more stimulus as the Sino-US trade war escalates.
Beijing is widely expected to announce more support measures in coming weeks to avert the risk of a sharper economic slowdown as the United States ratchets up trade pressure, including the first cuts in some key lending rates in four years.
On Friday, the central bank cut banks’ reserve requirements for the seventh time since early 2018 to free up more funds for lending, days after a cabinet meeting signaled that more policy loosening may be imminent.
August exports fell 1 percent from a year earlier, the biggest fall since June, when it fell 1.3 percent, customs data showed on Sunday. Analysts had expected a 2.0 percent rise in a Reuters poll after July’s 3.3 percent gain.
That’s despite analyst expectations that looming tariffs may have prompted some Chinese exporters to bring forward or “front-load” US-bound shipments into August, a trend seen earlier in the trade dispute.
Many analysts expect export growth to slow further in coming months, as evidenced by worsening export orders in both official and private factory surveys. More US tariff measures will take effect on Oct. 1 and Dec. 15.
Sunday’s data also showed China’s imports shrank for the fourth consecutive month since April. Imports dropped 5.6 percent on-year in August, slightly less than an expected 6.0 percent fall and unchanged from July’s 5.6 percent decline.
Sluggish domestic demand was likely the main factor in the decline, along with softening global commodity prices. China’s domestic consumption and investment have remained weak despite more than a year of growth boosting measures.
China reported a trade surplus of $34.84 billion last month, compared with a $45.06 billion surplus in July. Analysts had forecast a surplus of $43 billion for August.
August saw dramatic escalations in the bitter year-long trade row, with Washington announcing 15 percent tariffs on a wide range of Chinese goods from Sept. 1. Beijing hit back with retaliatory levies, and let its yuan currency fall sharply to offset some of the tariff pressure.
China and the United States on Thursday agreed to hold high-level talks in early October in Washington, the first in-person discussions since a failed US-China trade meeting at the end of July.
But there was no indication that any planned tariffs on Chinese goods would be halted, and markets expect a lasting peace between the two countries seems more elusive than ever.
White House economic adviser Larry Kudlow said on Friday the United States wants “near term” results from US-China trade talks in September and October but cautioned that the trade conflict could take years to resolve.
China’s trade surplus with the United States stood at $26.95 billion in August, narrowing from July’s $27.97 billion.
It still reached $195.45 billion in the first eight months of 2019, highlighting continued imbalances which have been a core complaint of Trump’s in his administration’s negotiations with Beijing.


Oman said to mull new regional airline

Updated 19 min 56 sec ago

Oman said to mull new regional airline

DUBAI: Oman is considering setting up a new regional airline that could take over domestic operations from state carrier Oman Air, two sources familiar with the matter told Reuters.

A request for proposal was issued this month by state entity Oman Aviation Group for a feasibility study into operating the new airline, “Oman Link,” the sources said.

Setting up a new airline for domestic flights would allow Oman Air to focus on its international network where it competes with large Gulf carriers Emirates, Qatar Airways, and Etihad Airways.

The new airline could partner with Oman Air with both carriers connecting passengers to each other but would have its own independent management, the sources said on the condition of anonymity because the details are private.

Proposals are to be submitted by Nov. 11, one of the sources said.

The new airline would use regional jets for domestic flights and potentially later to other cities in the region where there is not enough demand to fill the larger single aisle jets used by other airlines in Oman.

FASTFACT

Oman Air operates flights to four airports in the country, including the main Muscat International.

Oman Aviation Group and its unit Oman Air did not respond to separate emailed requests for comment.

Oman Air operates flights to four airports in the country, including the main Muscat International, according to its website.

The airline uses 166-seat Boeing 737 jets and 71-seat Embraer E175 aircraft on domestic and regional flights.

Both aircraft types are too costly to consistently operate domestic routes at a profit, according to industry sources.

Oman has been restructuring its aviation sector in recent years. Oman Aviation Group was formed in 2018 and includes Oman Air, Oman Airports and Oman Aviation Services.

A budget, second airline, Salam Air, was launched in 2017. It is owned by Omani government pension funds and the Muscat municipality.

Last week, Eithad and Air Arabia said they were jointly setting up a low cost carrier in Abu Dhabi.