Arab News Saudi National Day video scoops top WAN-IFRA prize

Updated 07 March 2019

Arab News Saudi National Day video scoops top WAN-IFRA prize

  • The video was commissioned to mark the start of Arab News' coverage of Vision 2030
  • Arab News has one several awards for its design

DUBAI: A video produced for Saudi National Day by Arab News has scooped the top prize in an international media award ceremony held in Dubai on Wednesday.

The video was commissioned to launch the newspaper's 'Road to 2030' section which encompasses a series of reports focusing on tracking the progress and reforms happening in the kingdom, such as allowing women to drive and reopening cinemas.

The online video category at the WAN-IFRA Middle East Awards is the latest award given to the Saudi Arabian English language daily since its relaunch in April 2018, after picking up silver in the “redesigned product category” at the WAN-IFRA Print Innovation Awards, held in Berlin on Oct. 9.

Arab News scooped another international design award last month, this time recogniz in the international design awards run by “HOW” magazine for its iconic Women Drivers cover of a special souvenir edition on June 24 of last year.

Simon Khalil, global creative director at Arab News, said: “Saudi Arabia is such an exciting country full of rich history and amazing people.

“The video reflects that history and focusses on the incredibly bright future Saudi Arabia has thanks to the Road to 2030 initiative, these really are exciting times for the Kingdom and for any designers and content creators it is an absolute joy to work with such exciting and positive stories.

“Since our redesign and relaunch last April we have done amazing things and always look for innovative and exiting ways to engage with our readers. Long may that continue,” he added.

The video was produced to highlight Saudi Arabia’s past, present and future.

WAN-IFRA, a global association of newspapers and news publishers, recognizes publishers that have adopted digital media and mobile strategies as part of their total product offering to “meet the changes in how people consume news and information.”


Malaysian police chief insists Al Jazeera probe ‘professional’

Updated 05 August 2020

Malaysian police chief insists Al Jazeera probe ‘professional’

  • The government said the documentary tarnished the image of the country
  • Abdul Hamid said the investigation “will be very transparent”

KUALA LUMPUR: Malaysia’s police chief insisted Wednesday investigations into an Al Jazeera documentary are being conducted “professionally” and rejected concerns about worsening media freedom, a day after the broadcaster’s office was searched.
Authorities are investigating the news network’s program “Locked up in Malaysia’s Lockdown,” after the government was angered by its critical look at the treatment of migrant workers during the coronavirus pandemic.
Officials on Tuesday searched the Qatar-based broadcaster’s Kuala Lumpur office and seized two computers, sparking fresh anger from Al Jazeera and rights groups and adding to concerns about media independence in Malaysia.
But the country’s Inspector-General of Police Abdul Hamid Bador said the search by police and communications ministry officials was carried out “very professionally.”
“It was not a military kind of action taken by the police,” he told AFP in an interview.
He added that Al Jazeera staff were “informed earlier of our intent to be there. They were even asked which devices were used. They cooperated.”
The search came after seven Al Jazeera journalists were questioned by police last month in connection with the documentary.
Abdul Hamid said the probe would be wrapped up soon, after which the attorney-general will decide whether to bring charges.
But the government insists the documentary — which focused on alleged mistreatment of migrants when they were rounded up during a coronavirus lockdown in May — tarnished the country’s image.
Authorities say the round-up was necessary to protect the public from the virus.
Al Jazeera is being probed for alleged sedition, defamation and transmitting offensive content, but it has stood by the documentary and insists the reporting was impartial.
Abdul Hamid said the investigation “will be very transparent” and insisted journalists in Malaysia were still free to do their jobs.
But he also urged international media to “be responsible,” calling them not to “write something... that is inaccurate.”

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