Dozens rescued from flooding as heavy rain shuts schools and roads in Saudi Arabia

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The heavy rain flooded roads in Madinah. (Supplied)
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The heavy rain flooded roads in Madinah. (Supplied)
Updated 30 January 2019

Dozens rescued from flooding as heavy rain shuts schools and roads in Saudi Arabia

  • The Civil Defense said it rescued 65 people in Tabuk and Al-Jouf and 37 people west of Duba
  • Severe weather forecast to last until Tuesday

JEDDAH: Heavy rainfall and sandstorms in the Kingdom have led to flooding, school closures and poor visibility, authorities said Monday as they urged people to take precautions during the bout of bad weather.

Rain hit northern and western parts of Saudi Arabia on Sunday and Monday, while sand swept through major population areas to bog down the skyline.

Schools shut in Tabuk, Arar and Al-Jouf because of flooding and there was low visibility in Riyadh among other places.

"Riyadh, Makkah, the northern border region, Hail, Tabuk, Qassim, Madinah, the eastern province, Asir, Jazan and Al-Jouf are experiencing unstable weather and the General Directorate of Civil Defense calls on citizens and residents not to risk themselves and their families, and avoid going to valleys or dangerous areas," Maj. Mohammed Al-Hammadi, Civil Defense spokesman, told Arab News.

King Abdulaziz International Airport in Jeddah urged passengers to check their flights with delays and cancelations expected.

Civil Defense said it had rescued 65 people in Tabuk and Al-Jouf and 37 people in Duba. It told people to exercise restraint while driving and take maximum precautions.

The General Authority for Meteorology and Environmental Protection forecast rainfall in the north and west, and sandstorms or dusty winds in several parts of the Kingdom.

Thunderstorms are expected to be accompanied by gusty winds and dust, reducing visibility in Riyadh and the Eastern Region and resulting in lower temperatures.

In Makkah winds of 37 km/h are forecast, while in Jeddah wind speeds could reach 50 km/h. 




Dust filled the air in Riyadh on Monday. (Iqbal Hossain)

Hazy weather was expected early Tuesday in Al-Jouf, Northern Borders, Hail, Qassim and the Eastern Region.

Tabuk is expected to be mostly sunny, with a maximum temperature of 16 degrees Celsius.


Recent archaeological discoveries highlight Saudi as ‘cradle of human civilizations’

Updated 06 December 2019

Recent archaeological discoveries highlight Saudi as ‘cradle of human civilizations’

  • 44 international archaeological missions were carried out in the kingdom this year
  • Discoveries continue to instill the civilized dimension of Saudi Arabia

RIYADH: Saudi Arabia has become a leader in the field of archaeological research in the past five years, a major exhibition in Rome was told.

Abdullah Al-Zahrani, director-general of archaeological research and studies at the Saudi Commission for Tourism and National Heritage, said that 44 international archaeological missions had been carried out this year in the Kingdom.

He was speaking on the sidelines of the “Roads of Arabia: Masterpieces of Antiquities in Saudi Arabia Across the Ages” exhibition, which opened at the National Museum of Rome on Nov. 26.

The groundbreaking exhibition was inaugurated by Saudi Minister of Culture Badr bin Abdullah bin Farhan and Italian Minister of Cultural Heritage and Activities Dario Franceschini.

Al-Zahrani said that the Kingdom “has become one of the most advanced countries in terms of archaeological disclosures.”

“Recent discoveries by local and international missions have highlighted the Kingdom’s historical status and cultural depth as the cradle of the beginnings of human civilizations,” he said.

Archaeological discoveries continue to “instil the civilized dimension of the Kingdom,” he said.

“The religious, political, economic and cultural stature that Saudi Arabia enjoys is an extension of its long cultural heritage, in addition to its distinctive geographical position as a bridge and hub of cultural interaction between East and West that made it a meeting point for international land and sea trade routes throughout all ages,” he added.