Kulsoom Nawaz opens her eyes for the first time in a month

In this file photo, ​Kulsoom Nawaz with her husband Nawaz Sharif at a hospital in London. (Photo courtesy: Maryam Nawaz's Twitter account)
Updated 12 July 2018

Kulsoom Nawaz opens her eyes for the first time in a month

  • Former Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif’s wife still on life support in London clinic

ISLAMABAD: Former Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif’s wife, Kulsoom Nawaz, reportedly opened her eyes for a short time on Thursday, though she has not regained consciousness completely.
Kulsoom is currently on life-support at the Harley Street Clinic, London. She suffered a cardiac arrest last month, and was diagnosed with throat cancer in 2017.
Sharif’s son, Husain Nawaz, told media in London that his mother had blinked for the first time “exactly after one month.”
“The doctors have changed her ventilator settings and reduced her sedatives,” he said, adding that he asked people to pray for his mother’s health. 
Much like her brother, Maryam Nawaz also heaved a sigh of relief, though she said it was not clear if her mother had “seen or registered us.”
The ex-premier and his daughter, who are facing graft charges, had gone to London to see Kulsoom when they were convicted in the Avenfield reference. Father and daughter were sentenced to 10 and seven years in prison respectively by the accountability court in Lahore, and are due to file an appeal against the decision.
Prior to the verdict, the two had promised to return to the country after Kulsoom regained consciousness.
After their conviction, however, Maryam announced that her father would place his national responsibilities over personal ones and would return to Pakistan. Sharif and his daughter are expected to arrive in Lahore on Friday evening. 


Namibia rejects German genocide reparations offer

Updated 2 min 52 sec ago

Namibia rejects German genocide reparations offer

  • German occupiers in Namibia killed tens of thousands of indigenous Herero and Nama people in 1904-1908 massacres
  • Germany has repeatedly refused to pay direct reparations, citing millions of euros in development aid to the Namibian government

WINDHOEK: Namibia’s President Hage Geingob on Tuesday said reparations offered by Germany for mass killings in its then colony at the start of the twentieth century were “not acceptable” and needed to be “revised.”
German occupiers in Namibia killed tens of thousands of indigenous Herero and Nama people in 1904-1908 massacres, which historians have called the first genocide of the 20th century.
In 2015, the two countries started negotiating an agreement that would combine an official apology by Germany as well as development aid.
Geingob on Tuesday was briefed by his government’s special envoy Zed Ngavirue on the status of negotiations.
The briefing took place ahead of a final round of talks for which a date has yet to be set.
“The current offer for reparations made by the German government remains an outstanding issue and is not acceptable to the Namibian government,” Geingob said in a statement after the briefing, adding that Ngavirue had been asked to “continue with negotiations for a revised offer.”
No details were provided on the offer.
The president also noted that Germany had declined to accept the term “reparations,” as that word was also avoided during the country’s negotiations with Israel after the Holocaust.
Ngavirue rejected Germany’s reference to reparations as “healing the wounds” and said the terminology would be subject to further debate, according to the statement.
Berlin was not immediately available for comment on the claims.
Germany has acknowledged that atrocities occurred at the hands of its colonial authorities and some officials have even recognized it as a genocide.
But the country has repeatedly refused to pay direct reparations, citing millions of euros in development aid to the Namibian government.
Namibia was called German South West Africa during Germany’s 1884-1915 rule, and then passed under South African rule for 75 years, finally gaining independence in 1990.
Tensions boiled over in 1904 when the Herero rose up, followed by the Nama, in an insurrection crushed by German imperial troops.
In the Battle of Waterberg in August 1904, around 80,000 Herero fled including women and children.
German troops went after them across what is now known as the Kalahari Desert. Only 15,000 Herero survived.
The German government has so far refused to apologize for the killings.