Turkey’s Erdogan to be sworn in Monday with new powers

Recep Tayyip Erdogan has dominated Turkey first as premier from 2003 then president from 2014. (AFP)
Updated 04 July 2018

Turkey’s Erdogan to be sworn in Monday with new powers

ANKARA: President Recep Tayyip Erdogan will on Monday be sworn in for a second mandate as Turkey’s head of state after his election triumph last month, assuming sweeping powers granted under a new constitution, a presidential source said.
Erdogan, who has dominated Turkey first as premier from 2003 then president from 2014, scored an outright victory in the first round of the June 24 elections with 52.6 percent of the vote.
Those elections were particularly crucial as it is only after the polls that the new presidential system, which was agreed in a 2017 referendum and opponents fear will lead to one-man rule, comes into force.
Erdogan will be sworn at the parliament, a presidential source, who asked not to be named, said. State media reports said the oath ceremony would be at 1300 GMT.
Two hours later a “transition ceremony” marking the shift to the new system will take place at his vast presidential palace on the outskirts of Ankara, Anadolu news agency reported.
The Turkish leader is expected to deliver a speech during the ceremony to be attended by leading figures from the business, art and sports as well as foreign heads of state, according to the Hurriyet daily.
The ceremony will be followed by a dinner and then Erdogan is due to announce his new cabinet, it said.
Under the new system, Erdogan will enjoy greater powers with the authority to appoint and sack ministers, judges and other state officials.
The post of prime minister, currently held by Erdogan’s ally Binali Yildirim, is to be scrapped as of Monday, leaving the president in full and sole charge of the government.
A decree published in the Official Gazette on Wednesday formalized the transfer of some duties and authorities of the cabinet to the president.
Also, the references in certain laws like “cabinet” and “prime ministry” have been changed to say “president” and the “presidency,” according to the decree.
The new regulations will come into force on the day the president is sworn in, Anadolu said.
The new parliament is meanwhile expected to be sworn in two days earlier on Saturday.
Erdogan’s ruling Justice and Development Party (AKP) has failed to secure a majority in the 600-seat parliament on its own in the June elections. But it does enjoy a clear majority within a pact with its partner the right-wing Nationalist Movement Party (MHP).


Turkey ‘sends Libya maritime accord’ to UN for approval

Updated 12 December 2019

Turkey ‘sends Libya maritime accord’ to UN for approval

  • Turkey says the accord aims to protect its rights and is in line with international law
  • The European Union has readied sanctions against Turkey in response to its actions around Cyprus
ANKARA: Turkey on Thursday sent its accord with Libya on a maritime boundary between the two countries to the United Nations for approval, a Turkish diplomatic source said, despite objections from Greece that the agreement violates international law.

Two weeks ago, Libya’s internationally recognized government and Turkey signed the maritime delimitation agreement, in a move that escalated disputes over potential offshore gas reserves in the eastern Mediterranean.

Turkey says the accord aims to protect its rights and is in line with international law. President Tayyip Erdogan said that the accord will allow Turkey and Libya to hold joint exploration operations in the region.

Infuriated by the pact, Greece accused Libya’s government of deception and expelled the Libyan ambassador to Athens. It also said it had lodged objections with the United Nations, saying the accord violated international law.

Tensions were already running high between Greece and Turkey because of Turkish gas exploration in the eastern Mediterranean off the coast of the divided island of Cyprus. The NATO members are also at odds over mineral rights in the Aegean Sea.

The European Union has readied sanctions against Turkey in response to its actions around Cyprus, which was split in a 1974 Turkish invasion following a Greek-inspired coup. Peace talks on the island have been in limbo since UN-led efforts collapsed in 2017.