Steyn strikes twice on Test return

ONE DOWN: South Africa's Dale Steyn celebrates the wicket of New Zealnd's Tom Latham during the second day of the first cricket Test match in Durban, South Africa, on Saturday.(Reuters)
Updated 20 August 2016

Steyn strikes twice on Test return

DURBAN: After eight months of frustration, South African fast bowler Dale Steyn left the field at Kingsmead on Saturday with “a smile on his face,” according to bowling coach Charl Langeveldt.
Unfortunately for Steyn and his fellow bowlers, they walked off at lunchtime and didn’t return after reducing New Zealand to 15 for two on the second day of the first Test.
Rain prevented any more play and meant South Africa could not take further advantage of favorable bowling conditions as they sought to defend a first innings total of 263.
Steyn, playing in his first Test match since December, bowled a mesmerizing spell of two for three in six overs, dismissing both New Zealand opening batsmen.
At 33, questions had been asked Steyn’s ability to come back with anything like the impact that made him the long-time number one-ranked Test bowler.
He has dropped to number three after playing in only two out of South Africa’s previous eight Tests, failing to complete either because of groin and shoulder injuries.
But on a greenish pitch under a heavily overcast sky, it was though a rewind button had been switched as Steyn bowled with immaculate control, backed up by Vernon Philander, also coming back from injury.
Langeveldt said he was delighted to have the pair back, bringing their skill and experience to a South African team that has slumped from number one to number seven in the Test team rankings.
If there was a question that Steyn left unanswered in his brief spell, it was whether he could still bowl at speeds well in excess of 140kmh, but Langeveldt shrugged that off.
“Dale likes to bowl within himself with the new ball,” said Langeveldt. “He prefers to have control up front. You will see that he bowls faster in his second and third spells.”
Steyn had Tom Latham caught at first slip by Hashim Amla for four off the second ball of his fourth over.
He followed up in his next over with a full in-swinger which trapped Martin Guptill leg before wicket for seven.
Latham added only one run after being dropped off Philander.
Guptill survived an appeal for leg before wicket off Steyn’s fourth ball of the innings when he was on two.
Umpire Richard Illingworth turned down the appeal and South Africa decided not to seek a review. Replays showed the ball was clipping leg stump in the ‘umpire’s call’ area so a review would have failed.
Three overs later Latham edged Philander low to second slip where Dean Elgar spilled a relatively straightforward chance.
Although Steyn had the better figures, Philander also looked close to his best form after missing South Africa’s most recent seven Test matches because of an ankle injury. In the last over before lunch he twice beat Ross Taylor with balls that swung sharply away from the bat.
Earlier, it took New Zealand ten overs to take South Africa’s remaining two wickets after rain delayed the start by 50 minutes.
Tim Southee struck with the eighth ball of the day when he bowled Steyn before South Africa had added to their overnight total of 236 for eight.
Kagiso Rabada and Dane Piedt added 27 runs for the last wicket despite New Zealand taking the second new ball, which enabled Southee and Trent Boult to gain extravagant movement in the overcast conditions.
Rabada, who was dropped by Southee at third slip off Boult when he had 16, battled his way to an unbeaten 32 before Piedt was last man out, caught behind off Boult for nine.
Boult finished with figures of three for 52.


FIA launches probe into fiery Grosjean crash at Bahrain Grand Prix

Updated 03 December 2020

FIA launches probe into fiery Grosjean crash at Bahrain Grand Prix

  • The Halo device is widely considered to have helped save Romain Grosjean’s life

SAKHIR, Bahrain: Motor racing chiefs announced on Thursday the launch of an investigation into Romain Grosjean’s fiery Bahrain crash, saying the forensic probe would take “around six to eight” weeks to complete.
The French Formula One driver somehow wrenched himself free from his blazing Haas car with just burns to his hands and a broken left foot after a collision with Daniil Kvyat on the first lap of Sunday’s Grand Prix. He left hospital on Wednesday.
In the immediate aftermath of the shocking smash there was widespread praise for modern safety measures in the sport, but also concern over what F1’s motor sport managing director Ross Brawn described as “unpredictable” failures.
The International Automobile Federation (FIA) said it had “initiated a detailed analysis of Romain Grosjean’s accident at the 2020 Bahrain Grand Prix.”
The FIA’s safety director, Adam Baker, said: “With so much data available in Formula 1, it allows us to accurately determine every element of what occurred and this work has already begun.
“We take this research very seriously and will follow a rigorous process to find out exactly what happened before proposing potential improvements.”
The FIA probe will look at a range of factors including Grosjean’s helmet, safety harness, headrest, in-car extinguisher and the Halo cockpit protection.
The Halo device is widely considered to have helped save Grosjean’s life as his car was sliced in two after careering into a barrier.
“The ‘halo’ saved the day and it saved Romain,” Brawn said on Sunday.
“There was controversy in developing it initially, but there can’t be any doubt now, so hats off to those who pushed for the introduction.”
But he added: “The fire is worrying. The split in the barrier is worrying and the barrier coming apart, but we can be happy with the safety of the car – that got us through today, but things failed in an unpredictable way.
“We haven’t seen anything like that for a very long time, but the barrier splitting normally results in a fatality.”
At the circuit new safety measures have been introduced to reduce the risk of a repeat crash at this Sunday’s Sakhir Grand Prix.
Two rows of tires wrapped in a conveyor belt have been installed in front of a reconstructed guardrail at the exit of Turn Three.
Several drivers expressed serious concerns at the failure of the barrier and the manner in which it was punctured.
In other changes to the circuit, where this weekend’s Grand Prix will be using the shorter “outer loop’, a kerb has been removed at Turn Nine – which was used as Turn 13 last Sunday – and a tire barrier in the approach to that corner has been extended and enlarged to four rows in depth.
Grosjean left hospital on Wednesday and in an Instagram post he highlighted the professionalism of a marshal with an extinguisher and the FIA doctor in the following Safety Car, who was on the scene very quickly.
“I told him he was a hero,” said Grosjean.
“He went into the fire as much as he could to save me. I felt Ian’s hands pulling me over the barrier and I knew I was safe... life will never be the same again.”
Grosjean is resting and healing from burns at a hotel in Abu Dhabi where he hopes he will be fit enough to race in the season-closing race next weekend.