Jewellery Salon sees international labels descend on Riyadh

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The Pochette 1781, as interpreted by Princess Nourah in five styles is part of a capsule collection that is on showcase at Jewellery Salon this year. (Supplied)
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The greatest pieces from the Bahraini jewelry house Devji Aurum, which is well-known in Bahrain and Dubai and has an Indian and Arabian jewelry style, are also on display.  (AN photo by Rahaf Jambi)
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(AN photo by Rahaf Jambi)
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The greatest pieces from the Bahraini jewelry house Devji Aurum, which is well-known in Bahrain and Dubai and has an Indian and Arabian jewelry style, are also on display.  (AN photo by Rahaf Jambi)
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The princess showcased her unique, bright, and sophisticated items with her brand, Nuun Jewles. (AN photo by Rahaf Jambi)
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One of these firms is Aspery, which collaborated with Nuun Jewles designer princess Noura Al Faisal to produce a capsule collection that features five clutches, each of which represents a distinct region of Saudi Arabia. (AN photo by Rahaf Jambi)
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(AN photo by Rahaf Jambi)
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While perusing the most exquisite collections and brightest jewels, the guests were drawn to a royal green pop-up that featured the distinctive designs of the Glenn Spiro house and the designer's presence. (AN photo by Rahaf Jambi)
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(AN photo by Rahaf Jambi)
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While perusing the most exquisite collections and brightest jewels, the guests were drawn to a royal green pop-up that featured the distinctive designs of the Glenn Spiro house and the designer's presence. (AN photo by Rahaf Jambi)
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Updated 23 February 2024
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Jewellery Salon sees international labels descend on Riyadh

  • The Asprey bags redesigned by Princess Nourah pay homage to Kingdom’s five regions with distinct motifs, colors

RIYADH: Riyadh’s Jewellery Salon, which wraps up on Friday, brought together international and local jewelry houses to meet Saudi clientele before the fair heads to Jeddah from Feb. 27 to March 1.

One of those firms was British luxury label Asprey, which collaborated with Saudi brand Nuun Jewel’s founder Princess Noura Al-Faisal to produce a capsule collection that features five clutches, each of which represents a distinct region of Saudi Arabia.




The Pochette 1781, as interpreted by Princess Nourah in five styles is part of a capsule collection that is on showcase at Jewellery Salon this year. (Supplied)

“Asprey are very well known for their jewelry but also for their bags. They are known for the Asprey Pochette 1781 iconic clutch, and I was trying to spread my wings as a designer and thought, ‘Wouldn’t it be wonderful to portray Saudi heritage in a way that’s not really thought of?’” Princess Noura told Arab News.  

The designer thought it would “be wonderful to be able to use traditional patterns from different areas (and) put them within the bag design so you have the leather on the outside and then the precious hand embroidery on the inside and that felt very Saudi as well somehow. The colors and the patterns — each one is truly representing that region,” Princess Noura added.

I was trying to spread my wings as a designer and thought, ‘Wouldn’t it be wonderful to portray Saudi heritage in a way that’s not really thought of?’

Princess Nourah Al-Faisal, Nuun Jewels founder

Powered by the desire to transform the jewelry scene in Saudi Arabia, Haya Al-Sunaida launched the Jewellery Salon in 2009 to invite international designers to an industry that was previously dominated by a few elites. Her aim was to curate an exhibition that could unite local and international jewelers in a single platform and serve exclusive clientele in the country.

While perusing exquisite jewels at the exhibition, which took place at the Al-Faisaliah Hotel, guests were drawn to a rainforest green pop-up that featured the distinctive designs of London’s Glenn Spiro jewelry house.




A selection of pieces from Bahraini jewelry house Devji Aurum featuring both Indian and Arabian jewelry styles was also on display.

“We are a family-run business that purchases rare gems. We’re not aiming to sell the pieces or grow it into a massive business; we are actual jewelers, dealers. Every year, we produce a specific number of pieces. We purchase materials, stones, and gems that we adore. In addition, we don’t promote anywhere while having a great client of private customers,” founder Spiro told Arab News.  

A selection of pieces from Bahraini jewelry house Devji Aurum, which is well-known in Bahrain and Dubai and boasts both Indian and Arabian jewelry styles, was also on display.




The greatest pieces from the Bahraini jewelry house Devji Aurum, which is well-known in Bahrain and Dubai and has an Indian and Arabian jewelry style, are also on display. (AN photo by Rahaf Jambi)

The fourth-generation owner of the brand Dev Devji attended personally to meet visitors.

“We are born and raised in Bahrain. So, we have been coming to the Saudi market for quite some time now. We have a huge clientele from Saudi Arabia that visits our boutiques in Bahrain and Dubai, so we’re quite excited to be part of the exhibition this year,” Devji said.  

Saudi jewelry label Sulaiman Al-Mudhiyan, known for their diamonds, brought glittering pieces to the Jewellery Salon exhibition and even offered competitive prices at the event.

“We are returning to this exhibition. We have a large selection of rings, earrings, and other items, and we are offering our guests incredible prices,” Nasser Ahmed, a sales executive at Sulaiman Al-Mudhiyan, said.

 


KSrelief extends training, water, health projects in Yemen

Updated 30 May 2024
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KSrelief extends training, water, health projects in Yemen

RIYADH: The Kingdom’s aid agency KSrelief is extending its training, food and health projects for vulnerable people in Yemen, the Saudi Press Agency reported on Wednesday.

In Taiz and the Hadramout governorate, the agency launched a life-skills program for orphans and women, which including sewing, managing businesses, and maintaining mobile phones.

In Aden, KSrelief concluded a training program on community cohesion in cooperation with the UN Development Programme, covering peace committees, conflict resolution and mediation.

In addition, the aid agency distributed 634 food parcels to 4,438 individuals in Aden.

In Hodeidah, 2,600 personal hygiene bags were delivered to displaced people in the Al-Jisha and Bani Jaber camps.

KSrelief also signed a deal with a civil society organization in Taiz to dig a well in the area that would benefit 3,150 individuals.

In Socotra governorate, KSrelief signed a pact with a civil society organization to construct a tank that would supply clean water to villages.


Saudi Railways announces increased seating capacity of Haramain High-Speed Train for Hajj season

Updated 30 May 2024
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Saudi Railways announces increased seating capacity of Haramain High-Speed Train for Hajj season

RIYADH: Saudi Arabia Railways on Wednesday announced the readiness of the Haramain High-Speed Railway to receive pilgrims for this year’s Hajj season and said it has increased the number of available seats by about 100,000.

SAR revealed its operational plan for the season at its five stations linking Makkah to Madinah, bringing the total number of seats to 1.6 million, up from more than a 1.3 million seating capacity last year, the Saudi Press Agency reported.
The 453-kilometer railway passes through the main Jeddah station in the Sulaymaniyah district, King Abdulaziz Airport station in Jeddah, and King Abdullah Economic City. 
“This expansion also considers the addition of more than 430 new trips to last year’s trips, raising the number of trips scheduled in the operational plan for this year to more than 3,800” from May 9 to June 25, while the numbers of trips on peak days will be 126, SPA said.
The Haramain High-Speed Railway train ranks among the 10 fastest electric trains globally. It reaches 300 km per hour, and operates a fleet of 35 trains, with a capacity of 417 seats per train. It functions based on an environment-friendly system and zero carbon emissions, and plays an important role in preserving roads’ infrastructure by reducing road traffic.


Islamic Ministry unites volunteers to serve pilgrims

Updated 29 May 2024
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Islamic Ministry unites volunteers to serve pilgrims

  • The initiative is part of the ministry’s ongoing efforts to promote a culture of volunteering within communities

MAKKAH: Almost 5,000 people are set to volunteer for programs launched by the Makkah arm of the Saudi Ministry of Islamic Affairs, Dawah and Guidance, the Saudi Press Agency reported on Wednesday.

The branch has launched 247 opportunities via its volunteering platform to coincide with the start of the Hajj season. These include distributing more than 235,000 water bottles at 3,850 mosques, providing umbrellas to pilgrims for protection against the sun, distributing booklets and providing meals.

The initiative is part of the ministry’s ongoing efforts to promote a culture of volunteering within communities.

Earlier, the Presidency of Religious Affairs at the Grand Mosque and the Prophet’s Mosque launched its operational plan for Hajj, promoting voluntary and humanitarian work.

It recognizes the Two Holy Mosques as attractive environments for such efforts, based on religious and Saudi values that highlight the importance of generosity and hospitality.


Al-Jubeir meets US, Costa Rica officials in Riyadh

Updated 29 May 2024
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Al-Jubeir meets US, Costa Rica officials in Riyadh

Saudi Minister of State for Foreign Affairs and climate envoy Adel Al-Jubeir met Robert Karem, national security adviser to US Senator Mitch McConnell, on Wednesday in Riyadh.

In a separate meeting, Al-Jubeir met Costa Rica’s non-resident ambassador to the Kingdom, Francisco Chacon Hernandez.

The talks in both meetings centered on bilateral relations as well as regional and international issues of mutual interest.


Global artists contemplate the future at Riyadh exhibition

Updated 29 May 2024
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Global artists contemplate the future at Riyadh exhibition

  • ‘Unfolding the Embassy’ contemplates humanity’s impact on the world

RIYADH: Fenaa Alawwal kicked off its most recent exhibition, “Unfolding the Embassy,” bringing together global artists to speculate on the looming future.

With scenography presented by Studio GGSV, the exhibition was curated by Sara Al-Mutlaq, whose initial instinct was to respond to the exhibition’s context.

Al-Mutlaq told Arab News: “The context is the Diplomatic Quarter and embassies … We ask: What is the future of the embassy?

“The moment that we’re living in today is witnessing a lot of changes. We feel it in technology, ChatGPT, the Ukraine war — there are a lot of things that are changing.”

As visitors enter the space, they are teleported to the year 2040. A SpaceX satellite orbiting the globe is the new reality, complete with a reception area, books, and brochures. Visitors soon realize that the decorative pieces around them are the artworks themselves.

As the story unfolds, they are left to wonder: What has happened to Earth?

The global experience was important for the curator; only artists of diverse backgrounds and practices could do justice to this collective narrative. Artists from Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, Egypt, Palestine, Bosnia, Zambia, and Belgium are taking part in the exhibition, presenting their vision and interpretation of the future through works that address important contemporary issues, such as climate change, artificial intelligence, migration, and identity.

“I really wanted to engage with Saudi creatives and artists, but also Arab artists … and to always include the rest of the world and look at the nuances of conversation that they’re also creating,” Al-Mutlaq explained.  

Saudi artist Ahaad Al-Amoudi’s “Frying Pan” video installation looks at the past to study the future, creating a place where memory is lost, readapted, and reinterpreted.

In an ever-changing world, the video questions the role of memory, the tools of navigation, and whether humans will be able to envision a future when the present is a disintegrating past.

Egyptian graphic designer and artist Ahmad Hammoud presents two complementary works: “Flag of the Stateless” and “Passport of the Stateless.” Using the common housefly as an emblem for the 10 million stateless individuals worldwide, the works contrast two “unwanted” elements, creating a sense of ownership and symbolizing strength and resistance to Western colonial views.

The exhibition also showcases a photography anthology created using images by Dia Murad, Naif Al-Quba, Federico Acciardi, and Peter Bogaczewicz.

The digital works by Bogaczewicz, a photographer with a background in architecture, are part of his larger series titled “Surface Tensions,” which focuses on how the natural and built environments come together in Saudi Arabia.

His selection includes captures of a car buried in sand dunes and an abandoned Ferris wheel amid construction, subtly reflecting the influence of his architectural background.

He told Arab News: “I think there’s an idea of Anthropocene being a theme of the exhibit. I think the way these photos fall into it is because they address a state of the man-made or man-altered environment. That is something completely unnatural and unique of our time. It’s probably something that can’t be reversed so purely … Natural environments are harder and harder to come by and that’s just a present fact of being on our planet.”

Visitors can also explore the fate of humanity in the context of climate change, shifting political structures, economic challenges, and AI’s subversive interventions in human life.

Adopting a forward-looking approach, the exhibition raises a challenging question: Do humans need the distance of light years to better see what is near?

Al-Mutlaq said: “At its essence, the exhibition is a fictional time-space that highlights the fictional attributes of our economic, collective and technological worlds. In exploring the role of fiction, the exhibition and its artists ask: At the depth of truth, do we find the landscape of the arbitrary?”

The exhibition, running until Sept. 1, also features works from Dima Srouji, Abbas Zahedi, Aseel Al-Yaqoub, Nolan Oswald Dennis, Jerry Galle, PHI Studio, and Lana Cmajcanin.