Afghan survivors of US drone strike: Sorry ‘is not enough’

An Afghan man at the Ahmadi family house in Kabul, Afghanistan, Sept. 13, 2021. (AP Photo)
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Updated 18 September 2021

Afghan survivors of US drone strike: Sorry ‘is not enough’

  • The driver of the targeted vehicle, Zemerai Ahmadi, was a longtime employee at an American humanitarian organization
  • US Marine Gen. Frank McKenzie, head of US Central Command, called the strike a ‘tragic mistake’

KABUL, Afghanistan: Sorry is not enough for the Afghan survivors of an errant US drone strike that killed 10 members of their family, including seven children.
Emal Ahmadi, whose 3-year-old daughter Malika was killed on Aug. 29, when the US hellfire missile struck his elder brother’s car, told The Associated Press on Saturday that the family demands Washington investigate who fired the drone and punish the military personnel responsible for the strike.
“That is not enough for us to say sorry,” said Ahmadi. “The USA. should find the person who did this.”
Ahmadi said the family is also seeking financial compensation for their losses and demanded that several members of the family be relocated to a third country, without specifying which country.
The AP and other news organizations in Kabul reported after the strike that the driver of the targeted vehicle, Zemerai Ahmadi, was a longtime employee at an American humanitarian organization and cited an absence of evidence to support the Pentagon’s assertion that the vehicle contained explosives.
The missile struck as the car was pulling into the family’s driveway and the children ran to greet Zemerai.
On Friday, US Marine Gen. Frank McKenzie, head of US Central Command, called the strike a “tragic mistake,” and after weeks of denials, said that innocent civilians were indeed killed in the attack and not a Daesh extremist as was announced earlier.
The drone strike followed a devastating suicide bombing by the Daesh group — a rival of the Taliban — that killed 169 Afghans and 13 US military personnel at one of the gates to the Kabul airport. For days, desperate Afghans had swarmed the checkpoints outside the airport, trying to leave the country amid the chaotic US and NATO troops pullout, fearing for their future under the Taliban.
McKenzie apologized for the error and said the United States is considering making reparation payments to the family of the victims.
Emal Ahmadi, who said he heard of the apology from friends in America, insisted that it won’t bring back members of his family and while he expressed relief for the US apology and recognition that his family were innocent victims, he said he was frustrated that it took weeks of pleading with Washington to at least make a call to the family.
Even as evidence mounted to the contrary, Pentagon officials asserted that the strike had been conducted correctly, to protect the US troops remaining at Kabul’s airport ahead of the final pullout the following day, on Aug. 30.
Looking exhausted, sitting in front of the charred ruins of Zemarai’s car, Ahmadi said he wanted more than an apology form the United States — he wanted justice, including an investigation into who carried out the strike “and I want him punished by the USA.”
In the days before the Pentagon’s apology, accounts from the family, documents from colleagues seen by The AP and the scene at the family home — where Zemerai’s car was struck by the missile — all sharply contradicted the accounts by the US military. Instead, they painted the picture of a family that had worked for Americans and were trying to gain visas to the US, fearing for their lives under the Taliban.
Zemerai was the family’s breadwinner had looked after his three brothers, including Emal, and their children.
“Now I am then one who is responsible for all my family and I am jobless,” said Emal Ahmadi. The situation “is not good,” said Ahmadi of life under the Taliban. International aid groups and the United Nations have warned of a looming humanitarian crisis that could drive most Afghans below the poverty level.
McKenzie said the decision to strike a white Toyota Corolla sedan, after having tracked it for about eight hours, was made in an “earnest belief” — based on a standard of “reasonable certainty” — that it posed an imminent threat to American forces at the Kabul airport. The car was believed to have been carrying explosives in its trunk, he said.
But Ahmadi wondered how the his family’s home could have been mistaken for a Daesh hideout.
“The USA. can see from everywhere,” he said of US drone capabilities. “They can see that there were innocent children near the car and in the car. Whoever did this should be punished.”
“It isn’t right,” he added.


Melbourne readies to exit world’s longest COVID-19 lockdown

Updated 46 sec ago

Melbourne readies to exit world’s longest COVID-19 lockdown

  • Prime Minister Scott Morrison on Thursday confirmed the state had reached that target, with more restrictions set to ease as inoculations hit 80% and 90%

SYDNEY: Millions in Melbourne are readying to come out of the world's longest COVID-19 lockdown later on Thursday even as cases hover near record levels, with pubs, restaurants and cafes rushing to restock supplies before opening their doors.
Since early August, residents in Australia's second-largest city have been in lockdown — their sixth during the pandemic — to quell an outbreak fuelled by the highly infectious Delta strain.
Officials had promised to lift lockdowns once double-dose vaccinations for people aged above 16 exceeded 70% in Victoria state, of which Melbourne is the capital.
Prime Minister Scott Morrison on Thursday confirmed the state had reached that target, with more restrictions set to ease as inoculations hit 80% and 90%.
"The longest road has been journeyed in Victoria and that long road really starts to open up tonight," Morrison told Seven News on Thursday.
From 11:59 p.m. (1359 GMT) Thursday, pubs and cafes can have 20 fully vaccinated patrons indoors and 50 outdoors, while hairdressers can allow entry for five customers. Masks will still be mandatory both indoors and outdoors.
By then, the city of five million would have spent a cumulative 262 days, or nearly nine months, under stay-home orders since March 2020 — the world's longest, exceeding a 234-day lockdown in Buenos Aires, according to Australian media.
Pubs have begun to take more beer ahead of the reopening with Carlton & United Breweries, owned by Japan's Asahi Group Holdings, saying it had moved an extra 50,000 kegs to venues across the city on Thursday.
As businesses prepare to welcome customers, daily infections rose to 2,232 in Victoria on Thursday, the second highest daily count in any Australian jurisdiction during the pandemic.

VACCINATION SURGE
After largely stamping out infections in 2020, Australia has ditched its COVID-zero approach and is aiming to live with virus amid higher vaccinations after being rocked by a third wave of infections in the country's southeast since mid-June.
Despite the Delta wave, Australia has recorded only about 152,000 cases and 1,590 deaths, far lower than many comparable countries.
Cases in New South Wales, home to Sydney, rose for the third straight day on Thursday to 372 from 283 a day earlier.
Virus-free Queensland state is on alert after reporting its first new local case in two weeks — an unvaccinated Uber driver who spent 10 days in the community while potentially infectious.
Sydney and Canberra, the national capital, exited lockdowns last week after speeding through their vaccination targets. Other states are COVID-free or have very few cases.
With restrictions beginning to ease, Qantas Airways said it would ramp up daily flights between Sydney and Melbourne, one of the world's busiest domestic routes before the pandemic, to about 15 from the first week of November from just one now.


South Korea seeks space race entry with first homegrown rocket

Updated 6 min 3 sec ago

South Korea seeks space race entry with first homegrown rocket

  • South Korea's space program has a chequered record — its first two launches in 2009 and 2010, which in part used Russian technology, both ended in failure

SEOUL: South Korea is aiming to join the ranks of advanced spacefaring nations on Thursday when it attempts to put a one-ton payload into orbit using its first fully homegrown rocket.
The country has risen to become the world’s 12th-largest economy and a technologically advanced nation, home to the planet’s biggest smartphone and memory chip maker, Samsung Electronics.
But it has lagged in the headline-making world of spaceflight, where the Soviet Union led the way with the first satellite launch in 1957, closely followed by the United States.
In Asia, China, Japan and India all have advanced space programs, and the South’s nuclear-armed neighbor North Korea was the most recent entrant to the club of countries with their own satellite launch capability.
Ballistic missiles and space rockets use similar technology and Pyongyang put a 300-kilogramme (660-pound) satellite into orbit in 2012 in what Western countries condemned as a disguised missile test.
Even now, only six nations — not including North Korea — have successfully launched a one-ton payload on their own rockets.
The South will become the seventh if the Korean Satellite Launch Vehicle II, informally called Nuri, succeeds in putting its 1.5-ton dummy cargo into orbit from the launch site in Goheung, with an altitude of 600 to 800 kilometers being targeted.
The three-stage rocket has been a decade in development at a cost of 2 trillion won ($1.6 billion). It weighs 200 tons and is 47.2 meters (155 feet) long, fitted with a total of six liquid-fueled engines.

But the South Korean space program has a chequered record — its first two launches in 2009 and 2010, which in part used Russian technology, both ended in failure, the second one exploding two minutes into the flight and Seoul and Moscow blaming each other.
Eventually a 2013 launch succeeded, but still relied on a Russian-developed engine for its first stage.
The satellite launch business is increasingly the preserve of private companies, notably Elon Musk’s SpaceX, whose clients include the US space agency NASA and the South Korean military.
But one expert said a successful Nuri launch offered South Korea “infinite” potential.
“Rockets are the only means available to mankind to go out into space,” Lee Sang-ryul, the director of the Korea Aerospace Research Institute, told local paper Chosun Biz.
“Having such technology means we have fulfilled basic requirements to join this space exploration competition.”
Thursday’s launch is one step on an increasingly ambitious space program for South Korea, which President Moon Jae-in said would seek to launch a lunar orbiter next year, after he inspected a Nuri engine test in March.
“With achievements in South Korean rocket systems, the government will pursue an active space exploration project,” he said.
“We will realize the dream of landing our probe on the Moon by 2030.”


Biden’s Japan envoy pick vows to make Nissan executive case a priority

Updated 20 October 2021

Biden’s Japan envoy pick vows to make Nissan executive case a priority

  • Greg Kelly has denied charges he helped Carlos Ghosn hide 9.3 billion yen ($81.4 million) of Ghosn’s earnings over eight years through deferred payments
  • Rahm Emanuel, who President Joe Biden has nominated to be his ambassador to key US ally Japan, told senators he would deal with it as if he was a congressman and Kelly a constituent

WASHINGTON: Rahm Emanuel, nominee to be the next US ambassador to Tokyo, vowed at his Senate confirmation hearing on Wednesday to prioritize the case of an American former Nissan Motor executive who is facing a possible prison term in Japan.
In September, Japanese prosecutors asked a Tokyo court to send the executive, Greg Kelly, to prison for two years for his alleged part in helping Carlos Ghosn, Nissan’s ousted CEO, hide earnings.
When asked about the case, Emanuel, who President Joe Biden has nominated to be his ambassador to key US ally Japan, told senators he would deal with it as if he was a congressman and Kelly a constituent.
“I’ve already started to inquire about this and I want a report on my desk and ... if you start asking that, that goes from here to up here as a top priority,” he said.
“This is not just another piece of business to be checked out,” he said. “I’m going to be approaching this subject as a former US congressman, who knows what it means when you have a constituent at heart.”
Emanuel, the former mayor of Chicago, was responding to a question from Republican Senator William Hagerty of Tennessee, a former ambassador to Japan, who asked if he would make it a top priority to clear Kelly’s name.
Hagerty referred to Kelly as a “Tennessee citizen” and said he had been “deceived” into leaving the state to go to Japan where he was arrested in 2018, even though his lawyers believed he had committed no crime.
Hagerty said Japan was the number one investor in his home state and called the case “a real impediment” to the US-Japan economic relationship.
Japanese prosecutors called for the jail sentence for Kelly, who has been on bail in Japan since 2018, during closing arguments in a trial that began a last year.
A ruling in the case is expected next year, and if found guilty, Kelly could join two other Americans serving time in Japan after a court sentenced them in July for helping smuggle Ghosn out of Japan on a private jet hidden in luggage to Lebanon at the end of 2019, where he remains free as a fugitive.
Kelly has denied charges he helped Ghosn hide 9.3 billion yen ($81.4 million) of Ghosn’s earnings over eight years through deferred payments, saying that his only goal had been to retain a chief executive who could have been lured away by a rival automaker.
Both former Nissan executives allege they are victims of a boardroom coup by former colleagues worried that Ghosn would push through a merger between Nissan and Renault SA , its largest shareholder.


Death toll rises as unprecedented rainfall hits India’s Himalayan state

Updated 20 October 2021

Death toll rises as unprecedented rainfall hits India’s Himalayan state

  • Incessant rain has caused massive destruction in the state lying on the southern slope of the Himalaya mountain range
  • Ecologists blame unplanned development in the mountainous state for increasing climate-related disasters

NEW DELHI: Nearly 50 people have died in flash floods triggered by unprecedented heavy rains in the northern Indian state of Uttarakhand, authorities said on Wednesday, as environmentalist warn the Himalayan region is seeing the effects of climate change and rampant development.

Incessant rain since Monday has caused flooding, landslides, and massive destruction in the state lying on the southern slope of the Himalaya mountain range, in what is a second devastating incident related to extreme weather this year. In February, a portion of the Nanda Devi glacier broke off in Uttarakhand’s Chamoli district, triggering an avalanche and flooding that killed dozens of people.

"There has been massive damage. It will take time to return to normalcy," Uttarakhand chief minister Pushkar Singh Dhami told reporters on Wednesday. "Roads were washed away, there were landslides, rivers changed their routes, villages were affected, bridges collapsed."

The amount of rain that fell on the region, especially its famous tourist destination and hill station Nainital was abnormal, according to the Indian Meteorological Department (IMD).

"This was an unprecedented rain at this time of the year. Normally, the monsoon is retreating at this time and chances of rain are slim, but this amount of rain is unheard of in recent history," Dr. Rajendra Kumar Jenamani of the IMD told Arab News.

Ecologists have been warning for years that the Himalayas are warming at an alarming pace, melting ice trapped in glaciers, elevating the risk of devastating floods and landslides. Nearby populations are vulnerable, as the region’s ecosystem has also become too fragile for construction projects.

Nainital-based journalist and environmental researcher Kavita Upadhyay said the local community has not recorded incidents that had brought devastation as large as that caused by Monday and Tuesday downpours.

"We received more than 500-millimeter rainfall in 24 hours, and this is the maximum in recorded history," she told Arab News. "When we get 60-milimeter rainfall it is called heavy rainfall, imagine the magnitude of 500 millimeters."

Upadhyay blamed unplanned development for the disaster.

"One would hear the word 'climate change' but I am not an expert on that, but what we do know is that extreme weather events have been increasing," she said. "The reason for the disaster is definitely the way development is happening in Uttarakhand. Be it roads, houses or expanding tourism, big infrastructure projects like that. I don’t think authorities have taken into account that extreme weather events will happen."

Delhi-based environmentalist Vimlendu Jha said the extreme weather incidents occurring in Uttarakhand were an indication of a "climate crisis."

"We cannot call it climate change because change is a moderate word. Here we are talking about the climate crisis which is causing extreme rainfall and also a lot of rainfall in a small period of time," he said.

Referring to previous climate-related disasters in the region, Jha said in each case devastation was happening as unplanned development — including of hydroelectric power plants and roads for which thousands of trees had been cut — was causing "nature’s fury."

"The reason why it got scaled up and extreme this time is because of the overall destruction of the local ecology," Jha said. "These are the reason we are witnessing this kind of nature’s fury."

 


Syrian family sue EU border agency over removal from Greece

Updated 20 October 2021

Syrian family sue EU border agency over removal from Greece

  • They say they were tricked into boarding a plane after they were told it was destined for Athens but instead it took them to Turkey
  • First-of-its-kind case will test the accountability of the EU’s border agency, Frontex, which blames Greek authorities for the deportation

LONDON: A Syrian family is taking the EU’s border agency to the European Court of Justice to seek damages for their deportation from Greece to Turkey, which occurred after they had lodged an asylum claim.

They say they were tricked into boarding a deportation flight by EU and Greek officials five years ago, after they were told they would be flown to Athens but were instead taken to Turkey.

Prakken d’Oliveira, a Dutch law firm specializing in human rights cases, said on Wednesday that it has filed a lawsuit against Frontex, the EU agency responsible for border enforcement, and is seeking damages on behalf of the family. The deportation amounted to a violation of their human rights, the firm said, and Frontex operated the flight that carried it out.

The incident was the first recorded case of expulsion of asylum seekers after the EU reached a deal with Turkey in 2016 that explicitly stated that people arriving in Greece would have access to a fair asylum procedure.

“Frontex has acknowledged there were human rights violations. (It) has accepted that the refugees never got the chance to have their asylum request processed,” said Lisa-Marie Komp, one of the lawyers representing the family.

She said it is critical that the EU agency is held accountable for its actions and added: “If it is to be given such a far-reaching mandate, then there should be effective possibilities to hold it to account. And if that is not possible, what it will amount to is the undermining of the basic principle of rule of law.

“Beside the fate of the family, what is so fundamental is that this is the first time the European court of justice will get the opportunity to rule whether Frontex can be held accountable.”

The action is the first of its kind brought before the Luxembourg-based tribunal. It will highlight the practice of illegal pushbacks and other methods that campaigners argue deny asylum seekers their rights.

Frontex has faced accusations of “actively destroying” the fundamental principles on which the EU was built by participating in the pushbacks.

The Syrian family, who have not been named for security reasons, said they were tricked into boarding the deportation flight after submitting asylum claims on the Greek island of Leros.

“I never knew I was (going to be) deported to Turkey,” the then 33-year-old father told reporters at the time. “The policemen said, ‘Leave your dinner, get your stuff, we will take you to a police station for the night and (then) tomorrow morning to Athens.’”

The family, which included four children between the ages of one and seven, were forced to sit separately on the flight. They identified representatives of the EU border agency by the insignia on their guards’ uniforms.

“They were in a very vulnerable position,” Komp said. “The treatment of the children on the flight was itself in contravention of the rights of the child, enshrined in article 24 of the charter of fundamental rights of the EU.

“The bottom line is they didn’t take any measures to check whether it was legal to take this family out of Greece.”

The family, from the Kurdish town of Kobani in Syria, are now living in northern Iraq, fearing persecution in war-torn Syria if they return home.

Frontex has blamed “national authorities” for the incident, arguing that its role was merely to provide “means of transport, trained escorts, translators and medical personnel.”

An investigation into the incident, the results of which were published 19 months later, found that the asylum claim was registered 11 days before the flight that took the family to Turkey but was only logged on the electronic police system a day after they were deported.

Yiannis Mouzalas, who was the minister in charge of Greek migration policy at the time, said he ordered an inquiry into the case when it became clear that “violations” had occurred.

“An asylum request was lodged and it was evident the process had been violated and something illegal had happened,” he said.

Mouzalas said he had no knowledge of the outcome of the inquiry because he subsequently left his post, but added: “I do know it was the responsibility of the competent Greek authorities (to remove them), not Frontex which transported them.”