Mobile camel library carries books to children in remote Pakistani villages

Roshan the camel seen with his mobile library in District Kech, Balochistan, Pakistan, on November 6, 2020 (Photo courtesy: Haneefa Abdul Samad)
Short Url
Updated 16 November 2020

Mobile camel library carries books to children in remote Pakistani villages

  • A local herder and his 12-year-old camel Roshan have been carrying a library of fifty books to six villages of Balochistan’s Kech district since October
  • The project has been made possible by the Judith Reading Room and Alif Laila Book Bus Society that has established more than 7,000 mobile libraries across Pakistan

QUETTA: In a remote part of Pakistan, two women and a charity have come up with a novel idea to help children continue reading and learning — a camel bearing books.
Pakistan closed its schools in March and sent over 50 million school and university-going Pakistanis home. The closures have put children in Balochistan at particular risk of falling behind, as the province is Pakistan’s most impoverished, with few schools and the lowest literacy rate in the country.
According to data from the Pakistan Bureau of Statistics, up to 62 percent of children between the ages of 5 and 16 are out of school in rural areas of Balochistan.
With the coronavirus pandemic threatening even more children, two sisters from Balochistan, Raheema Jalal, the principal of the Zubaida Jalal Girls High School, and Zubaida Jalal, the Pakistani minister for defense production, thought: if children couldn’t go to school, why not take the books to them?




Women and children gather to read books in Kech district, Balochistan, Pakistan, on November 6, 2020 (Photo courtesy: Haneefa Abdul Samad)

The sisters, who run the Female Education Trust Balochistan (FETB), reached out to the Alif Laila Book Bus Society (ALBBS), which has established more than 7,000 mobile libraries across Pakistan, with over 1.5 million books donated in the past four decades. In collaboration, they launched a mobile library that deploys local herder, Murad Dur Muhammad, and his 12-year-old camel, to carry books to help hundreds of children continue their education in Balochsitan’s remote Kech district.
The idea had previously been used in Ethiopia by Save the Children.
“When Zubaida Jalal learnt that camel libraries were being used in Ethiopia she thought of the joy such libraries could bring to children in Mand [a town in Balochistan province] and how they could help raise the literacy rate in the area,” said Syeda Basarat Kazim, president of the Alif Laila Book Bus Society.
“Alif Laila approached the Judith’s Reading Room with a proposal,” Kazim said, referring to a US-based organization that runs libraries in 22 countries. “The board of governors chose this as their board option prize and Mand’s camel library became the 101st Judith’s Reading Room library.”
Alif Laila prepared the library, named the camel, purchased books, games, puzzles and puppets in record time and the library was launched in October, Kazim said.
The camel was named Roshan, or bright light, Reheema Jalal said, “because he has been lighting [the path of] education for the deprived children of Balochistan.”

Since October 2, Roshan has taken his library of fifty books to six villages of Mand. Over 150 children have borrowed books from the program in the past six weeks, Raheema said.
The titles are in both Urdu and English and include storybooks, and books of general knowledge, science and Islamic studies. A majority of the children targeted are from grades one to six, but secondary school students have also borrowed books from the mobile library.
“Roshan supplies the books on Friday, Saturday and Sunday and covers three different villages every week,” Raheema said. “The library is open for two hours, from 4 p.m. to 6 pm. Children choose the books they like and return them after a week.”




Women and children gather to read books in Kech district, Balochistan, Pakistan, on November 6, 2020 (Photo courtesy: Haneefa Abdul Samad)

Roshan and Muhammad are also often accompanied by Haneefa Abdul Samad, a 30-year-old science and math teacher, who supports the duo by helping answer the children’s queries.
“Initially, I was reluctant as to how the idea would work in remote villages,” Samad, who is also the coordinator of the project, said. “But after seeing the reaction and love of children toward books, I decided to accompany Roshan to every single village of Kech.”




Locals gather around 12-year-old camel, Roshan, who carries books to help hundreds of children continue their education in Kech district, Balochistan, Pakistan, on November 6, 2020 (Photo courtesy: Haneefa Abdul Samad)

“As Pakistan grapples with the deadly coronavirus, and educational activities across the country are yet to be fully restored, the camel library has been engaging children to continue their studies and attachment with books,” Samad added.
One such student is Sara Abdul Rauf, a seventh grader from the Koh-e-Pusht village, who eagerly awaits Roshan’s visits.
“Not [just] me, but all the children, especially girls, are very happy with the camel library,” the 14-year-old, who wants to be a doctor, said. “It has been providing us with books at our doorsteps.”
The initial plan for the camel library was to reach “as many villages as possible” over a three-month period. But Raheema now hopes, with Alif Laila’s help, to expand the project to other areas of Kech and hire more camels to keep Roshan company.
“We had planned this program till December,” she said. “Fortunately, we have received a positive response from the children. After December, we will look for more donors and hire more camels to reach more villages of Kech.”


South Africa's Du Plessis says bubble life is not sustainable for players

Updated 23 January 2021

South Africa's Du Plessis says bubble life is not sustainable for players

  • South Africa's Du Plessis says bubble life is not sustainable for players
  • The South African player beleives Babar Azam and Shaheen Afridi can pose problems for his team

ISLAMABAD: South African cricketer Faf du Plessis believes spending months in a bio-secure bubble could soon become a major challenge for players.

“We understand that this is a very tough season and a tough challenge for a lot of people out there, but if it’s back-to-back-to-back bubble life, things would become a big challenge,” du Plessis said during a virtual news conference on Saturday.

Due to the coronavirus pandemic, cricketers have to adhere to strict procedures for an international series. In countries like Pakistan, international games are being played in empty stadiums and players' movement confined to just their hotel and stadiums.

Du Plessis is one of those South African cricketers, along with captain Quinton de Kock, to have experienced life in a bubble over the last few months. He played in the Indian Premier League in the United Arab Emirates and home series against Sri Lanka. Now he has a two-test series in Pakistan, starting Tuesday in Karachi, followed by the second test at Rawalpindi.

“The main priority is to play cricket, to be out there doing what we love instead of being at home … so I think that still remains the most important thing. But I think there would definitely come a point where players would struggle with this (bubble)," du Plessis said.

“If you look at a calendar of the last eight months, you’re looking at about four or five months in a bubble, which is a lot. For some of us (being) without family, it can get challenging. Right now, I’m still in a good place. I’m still feeling really motivated and driven, but I can only speak for myself.

“I don’t think it’s possible to continue from bubble to bubble to bubble, I’ve seen and heard a lot of players talk about it. I don’t think it’s sustainable.”

The South African team practiced at the National Stadium -- the venue for the test opener -- for the first time on Saturday. Before that, the visitors had been practicing at a stadium close to the team hotel for the last four days where they played intra-squad matches.

“For now, (I'm) enjoying the four walls of my room and then the pitch outside where we can get to do what we love,” du Plessis said.

The 36-year-old du Plessis, who has appeared in 67 test matches for South Africa with a batting average topping 40, will be playing his first test in Pakistan since making his debut against Australia in 2012. Pakistan last hosted South Africa in 2007. In 2009 international cricket’s doors were shut on Pakistan after an attack on the Sri Lanka cricket team bus at Lahore.

Du Plessis has played seven test matches against Pakistan that included two in the UAE and five in South Africa.

Du Plessis is South Africa’s most experienced player touring Pakistan, but wasn’t sure what type of wickets will be prepared for the two tests.

“I think that’s possibly the biggest thing that we are unsure about,” he said.

“As a team we try to prepare for everything and anything, overprepare, spin conditions, reverse swinging ball … if I have to call it, I probably said I think that wickets will be a bit more subcontinent like than it used to be back then (in 2007), so spinners would probably be more a little bit more in the game.”

Du Plessis has picked fit-again Pakistan all-format captain Babar Azam and fast bowler Shaheen Afridi as the two players who could pose problems for the tourists. Babar has regained fitness from a fractured thumb — in his absence Pakistan lost both the Twenty20 and test series in New Zealand.

“Obviously, having Babar back is massive for them,” du Plessis said.

“Afridi has been getting a lot of wickets, so probably someone like him would be pretty dangerous.”