Sudan’s Hamdok says government ready to cooperate with ICC over Darfur

Sudan’s government is ready to cooperate with the ICC for those accused of war crimes to appear before the court, PM Hamdok said. (File/AFP)
Short Url
Updated 22 August 2020

Sudan’s Hamdok says government ready to cooperate with ICC over Darfur

  • Bashir is wanted by the ICC for alleged war crimes, genocide and crimes against humanity in Darfur
  • Hamdok said Sudan had come a long way towards being removed from the US list of state sponsors of terrorism

KHARTOUM: Sudan's prime minister said on Saturday the country was ready to cooperate with the International Criminal Court (ICC) so those accused of war crimes in Darfur appear before the tribunal, a list that includes ousted President Omar Al-Bashir.
Bashir, who has been in jail in Khartoum since he was toppled after mass protests last year, is wanted by the ICC for alleged war crimes, genocide and crimes against humanity in Darfur in a conflict that killed an estimated 300,000 people.
The government reached a deal with rebel groups in February that all five Sudanese ICC suspects should appear before the court but Prime Minister Abdalla Hamdok had not previously publicly affirmed Sudan's position.
"I reiterate that the government is fully prepared to cooperate with the ICC to facilitate access to those accused of war crimes and crimes against humanity," Hamdok said in a televised address on the anniversary of his ascent to office.
Sudan's transitional government, a three-year joint civilian-military arrangement led by Hamdok, says it is close to a peace deal with some rebel groups active in Darfur, a vast region roughly the size of France.
The government and some of the rebels are expected to initial an agreement on Aug. 28.
Hamdok also said during his TV address that Sudan had come a long way towards being removed from the US list of state sponsors of terrorism.
There are intense communications with the American administration about removing Sudan from the list and significant progress is expected in the coming weeks, a senior government source told Reuters on Sunday.
Washington added Sudan to the list in 1993 over allegations that Bashir's Islamist government was supporting terrorist groups at the time.
The designation makes Sudan technically ineligible for debt relief and financing from the International Monetary Fund and World Bank. The US Congress would need to approve Sudan's removal from the list.


UN says Sudan needs $150 million to help Ethiopian refugees

Updated 57 min 38 sec ago

UN says Sudan needs $150 million to help Ethiopian refugees

  • The conflict broke out on November 4 between Ethiopia’s federal forces and leaders of the region’s ruling party
  • Sudan has since hosted more than 43,000 Ethiopian refugees fleeing from the intense fighting into one of its most impoverished regions

UM RAQUBA, Sudan: Sudan needs $150 million in aid to cope with the flood of Ethiopian refugees crossing its border from conflict-stricken Tigray, the UN refugee agency chief said Saturday during a visit to a camp.
The Tigray conflict broke out on November 4 between Ethiopia’s federal forces and leaders of the region’s ruling party.
Sudan has since hosted more than 43,000 Ethiopian refugees fleeing from the intense fighting into one of its most impoverished regions.
“Sudan needs $150 million for six months to provide these refugees water, shelter and health services,” said UN High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) Filippo Grandi at Um Raquba camp, some 80 kilometers (50 miles) from the border.
Grandi called on “donors to provide Sudan with these resources as soon as they can.”
Between 500 and 600 refugees are still crossing the border each day.
Sudan has sought to provide help to accommodate the mass refugee influx as it struggles with its own deep economic crisis.
The country is also going through a fragile transition since the April 2019 ouster of veteran strongman Omar Al-Bashir, after unprecedented mass protests against his rule, triggered by economic hardship.
Some 65 percent of Sudan’s nearly 42 million people live below the poverty line, according to government figures.
As the Tigray fighting rages, Grandi also voiced concern over the fate of tens of thousands of Eritrean refugees living in Ethiopia for decades.
“We don’t have access to them,” he said, urging the Ethiopian government to authorize visits by the United Nations.