Apple, Google drop Fortnite from app stores over payments

Epic Games said the system is the same payment system it already uses to process payments on PC and Mac computers and Android phones. (Reuters)
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Updated 14 August 2020

Apple, Google drop Fortnite from app stores over payments

  • Google said Fortnite will remain available on Android, just not through its app store
  • Apple and Google both take a 30% cut from in-app revenue purchases in games

NEW YORK: Apple and Google dropped the popular game Fortnite from their app stores after the game’s developer introduced a direct payment plan that bypasses their platforms.
Apple and Google both take a 30% cut from in-app revenue purchases in games, which has long been a sore spot with developers.
Fortnite is free, but users can pay for in game accoutrements like weapons and skins. Its developer, Epic Games, said in a blog post Thursday that it was introducing Epic Direct payments, a direct payment plan for Apple’s iOS and Google Play. Epic said the system is the same payment system it already uses to process payments on PC and Mac computers and Android phones.
Apple and Google said the service violates their guidelines.
“Epic enabled a feature in its app which was not reviewed or approved by Apple, and they did so with the express intent of violating the App Store guidelines regarding in-app payments that apply to every developer who sells digital goods or services,” Apple said in statement.
Google said Fortnite will remain available on Android, just not through its app store. Android users can download the app from other app stores, although that’s generally not an option for iPhone users.
Epic Games did not immediately return a request for comment. Epic’s Fortnite Twitter account said the company would debut a new short film called “Nineteen Eighty-Fortnite,” a seeming parody of Apple’s iconic “1984” commercial that introduced the Macintosh computer. It has also filed a complaint against Apple in the US District Court in Northern California for dropping Fortnite.


Oman’s bond market return a key test for reform path

Updated 21 October 2020

Oman’s bond market return a key test for reform path

  • After becoming ruler in January, Sultan Haitham made shaking up and modernising state finances a top priority

DUBAI: Oman’s return to the international bond market this week will be a test of its ability to convince investors that long-awaited fiscal reforms have started to put it on a sustainable financial footing.

Oman, rated below investment grade by all the major credit agencies, announced on Monday plans to issue bonds with maturities of three, seven and 12 years, in what would be its first global debt sale this year.

Sultan Haitham, who became Oman’s ruler in January, has made shaking up state finances one of his priorities.

But investors would like to see more concrete steps being taken and, after a further sovereign downgrade last week, may require the new bonds to offer a significant premium over the country’s existing debt.

“The new sultan has done some good things — rationalizing the number of ministries, the implementation of VAT, plans to generate additional tax revenues, and they still have sovereign assets,” said Raza Agha, head of emerging markets credit strategy at Legal & General Investment Management.

“There is positive momentum but it will take time for that credibility to build.”

According to a bond prospectus, Oman has begun talks with some Gulf countries for financial support.

“I don’t think this will actually be taken into consideration by investors unless there is a tangible announcement from Gulf countries with a tangible support package,” said Zeina Rizk, executive fixed income director at Arqaam Capital.

Oman will likely price the new three-year bonds in the high 4 percent area, the seven-year tranche in the high 6 percent and the 12-year in the mid-to-high 7 percent area, implying a premium of at least 50 basis points (bps) over its existing curve, she said.

Two other investors, who did not wish to be named, said the paper could carry a 25 bps premium over existing secondary trading levels.

Sources have previously told Reuters Oman would target over $3 billion with the new deal.

“If they take $3 to 3.5 billion, you will have a market indigestion for Oman, and I’m sure people will ask to be compensated for this risk,” Rizk said.

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