What We Are Reading Today: Quantitative Management of Bond Portfolios

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Updated 29 May 2020

What We Are Reading Today: Quantitative Management of Bond Portfolios

Authors: Lev Dynkin, Anthony Gould, Jay Hyman, Vadim Konstantinovsky and Bruce Phelps

The practice of institutional bond portfolio management has changed markedly since the late 1980s in response to new financial instruments, investment methodologies, and improved analytics. Investors are looking for a more disciplined, quantitative approach to asset management. Here, 5 top authorities from a leading Wall Street firm provide practical solutions and feasible methodologies based on investor inquiries. 

While taking a quantitative approach, they avoid complex mathematical derivations, making the book accessible to a wide audience, including portfolio managers, plan sponsors, research analysts, risk managers, academics, students, and anyone interested in bond portfolio management.

The book covers a range of subjects of concern to fixed-income portfolio managers — investment style, benchmark replication and customization, managing credit and mortgage portfolios, managing central bank reserves, and risk optimization.


What We Are Reading Today: First Things by Hadley Arkes

Updated 03 July 2020

What We Are Reading Today: First Things by Hadley Arkes

This book restores to us an understanding that was once settled in the “moral sciences:” That there are propositions, in morals and law, which are not only true but which cannot be otherwise. 

It was understood in the past that, in morals or in mathematics, our knowledge begins with certain axioms that must hold true of necessity; that the principles drawn from these axioms hold true universally, unaffected by variations in local “cultures;” and that the presence of these axioms makes it possible to have, in the domain of morals, some right answers. Hadley Arkes restates the grounds of that older understanding and unfolds its implications for the most vexing political problems of our day.

The author turns first to the classic debate between Abraham Lincoln and Stephen Douglas. After establishing the groundwork and properties of moral propositions, he traces their application in such issues as selective conscientious objection, justifications for war, the war in Vietnam, a nation’s obligation to intervene abroad, the notion of supererogatory acts, the claims of “privacy,” and the problem of abortion.