ICESCO announces prizes in Remote Culture initiative 

The head office of the Islamic World Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (ICESCO) in Rabat, Morocco. (ICESCO photo via Twitter)
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Updated 02 April 2020

ICESCO announces prizes in Remote Culture initiative 

  • Remote Culture is part of the “ICESCO Digital Home” initiative launched to support member states' efforts in fighting COVID-19

RIYADH: The Islamic World Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (ICESCO) has announced the creation of three awards for students in three cultural areas as part of its Remote Culture initiative.

The first prize is $6,000, the second is $4,000 and the third is $2,000, in addition to certificates of appreciation, in the fields of short story writing and painting, the organization said.

National committees in member states will communicate with educational institutions to invite students to take part in competitions, and will select three works of each category to be sent to ICESCO by the end of June 2020.

The organization then will form a specialized international jury to choose the best three works in each branch.

The initiative is part of the “ICESCO Digital Home” initiative launched to support member states' efforts in combating the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) and to find alternative solutions to ensure the sustainability of its educational, scientific and cultural work.

The new ICESCO initiative includes remote training and capacity-building for heritage frameworks, where the organization will be preparing and broadcasting a series of videos through its website as of April 15.

The videos include training programs in physical and intangible heritage, and documentation of cultural heritage using artificial intelligence techniques and risk-, crisis- and disaster-management in heritage sites and museums.

They will also introduce techniques for registering heritage sites on the lists of Islamic world heritage and world heritage, rehabilitating endangered crafts, promoting the general principles of managing museums in the Islamic world and protecting underwater cultural heritage.

The initiative also offers an invitation for remote reading to take advantage of ICESCO's digital libraries and other sites available.


What We Are Reading Today: Outsourcing Empire

Updated 05 June 2020

What We Are Reading Today: Outsourcing Empire

Authors: Andrew Phillips and J. C. Sharman 

From Spanish conquistadors to British colonialists, the prevailing story of European empire-building has focused on the rival ambitions of competing states. But as Outsourcing Empire shows, from the 17th to the 20th centuries, company-states— not sovereign states—drove European expansion, building the world’s first genuinely international system. 

Company-states were hybrid ventures: Pioneering multinational trading firms run for profit, with founding charters that granted them sovereign powers of war, peace, and rule. Those like the English and Dutch East India Companies carved out corporate empires in Asia, while other company-states pushed forward European expansion through North America, Africa, and the South Pacific. 

In this comparative exploration, Andrew Phillips and J. C. Sharman explain the rise and fall of company-states, why some succeeded while others failed, and their role as vanguards of capitalism and imperialism.

In dealing with alien civilizations to the East and West, Europeans relied primarily on company-states to mediate geographic and cultural distances in trade and diplomacy.

Emerging as improvised solutions to bridge the gap between European rulers’ expansive geopolitical ambitions and their scarce means, company-states succeeded best where they could balance the twin imperatives of power and profit. Yet as European states strengthened from the late eighteenth century onward, and a sense of separate public and private spheres grew, the company-states lost their usefulness and legitimacy.

Bringing a fresh understanding to the ways cross-cultural relations were handled across the oceans, Outsourcing Empire examines the significance of company-states as key progenitors of the globalized world.

 

 

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