Saudi electric car racer tastes victory in Mexico City E-Prix

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The electric car racer won the Pro-Am class of the Jaguar I-Pace eTrophy and finished fourth overall in the third race of the 2019/20 season. (Shutterstock)
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The electric car racer won the Pro-Am class of the Jaguar I-Pace eTrophy and finished fourth overall in the third race of the 2019/20 season. (Shutterstock)
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Updated 18 February 2020

Saudi electric car racer tastes victory in Mexico City E-Prix

  • The first and second rounds of the championship were held on Nov. 22 and 23 at Saudi Arabia’s Diriyah venue

RIYADH: Saudi driver Fahad Algosaibi has secured a major victory in the Mexico City E-Prix.

The electric car racer won the Pro-Am class of the Jaguar I-Pace eTrophy and finished fourth overall in the third race of the 2019/20 season which took place on Feb. 15 at the Autodromo Hermanos Rodriguez.

The participation of Algosaibi and Capt. Mashour bin Hojaila, both of Team Saudi Racing, was sponsored by the General Sports Authority (GSA) and the Saudi Arabian Motor Federation (SAMF).

Starting the race in pole position, Algosaibi recorded the fastest lap in his class, earning him extra points on top of those for pole position, to rank second in the championship on 36 points, just six behind Chinese driver Zhang Yaqi. Algosaibi also picked up points for not taking risks.

However, his teammate Hojaila ended up in hospital after his car was hit from behind by Chinese driver David Chang sending it crashing into a wall.

The organizing committee of the Jaguar I-Pace eTrophy Championship was forced to cancel qualifying trials due to the poor condition of the circuit in some newly paved sections and used the results of free trials to determine the starting lineup. This meant Algosaibi started first and Hojaila second in the Pro-AM class.

The first and second rounds of the championship were held on Nov. 22 and 23 at Saudi Arabia’s Diriyah venue.


Wimbledon will be canceled, believes Jamie Murray

Updated 31 March 2020

Wimbledon will be canceled, believes Jamie Murray

  • Tennis is at a standstill until June 7, with the entire European clay-court season already wiped out and the only Grand Slam event played on grass is expected to be officially canceled
  • Wimbledon organizers have ruled out playing the two-week tournament behind closed doors

LONDON: Cancelling Wimbledon is the only realistic option open to organizers as they grapple with the chaos caused by the coronavirus, says two-time Grand Slam men’s doubles champion Jamie Murray.
Tennis is at a standstill until June 7, with the entire European clay-court season already wiped out and the only Grand Slam event played on grass is expected to be officially canceled on Wednesday.
Wimbledon organizers have ruled out playing the two-week tournament, slated to run from June 29 to July 12, behind closed doors.
The French Open has already been postponed, shoehorned into the schedule in late September, and it will be difficult for Wimbledon to rearrange.
Murray, a Wimbledon men’s doubles finalist in 2015 and a two-time mixed doubles champion, said postponing the tournament presented a series of hurdles, including shorter evenings.
“I think for them, it’s difficult to move the tournament back because you’re running into other tournaments that are for the moment still on the schedule,” the 34-year-old Scotsman told the BBC on Tuesday.
“And also just things like daylight to host the event. Each week that passes, you get less and less light to play the tournament.
“Obviously they play until nine and 10 o’clock each night at Wimbledon.”
Murray, whose younger brother Andy is a two-time Wimbledon singles champion, is kicking his heels in the absence of tennis.
“I’m just at home, taking the necessary precautions, and trying to stay as active as I can,” he said.
“It’s different. We’re used to being on the road all the time, used to being in different cities every week, and you kind of become institutionalized to that.”