Bill Gates commissions first liquid hydrogen-powered superyacht, worth $644 million

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Bill Gates has bought the world’s first hydrogen-powered superyacht designed by Sandar Sinot, which is reported to be worth $644 million. (Photo: Sinot/sinot.com)
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Bill Gates has bought the world’s first hydrogen-powered superyacht designed by Sandar Sinot, which is reported to be worth $644 million. (Photo: Sinot/sinot.com)
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Bill Gates has bought the world’s first hydrogen-powered superyacht designed by Sandar Sinot, which is reported to be worth $644 million. (Photo: Sinot/sinot.com)
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Bill Gates has bought the world’s first hydrogen-powered superyacht designed by Sandar Sinot, which is reported to be worth $644 million. (Photo: Sinot/sinot.com)
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Bill Gates has bought the world’s first hydrogen-powered superyacht designed by Sandar Sinot, which is reported to be worth $644 million. (Photo: Sinot/sinot.com)
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Bill Gates has bought the world’s first hydrogen-powered superyacht designed by Sandar Sinot, which is reported to be worth $644 million. (Photo: Sinot/sinot.com)
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Updated 09 February 2020

Bill Gates commissions first liquid hydrogen-powered superyacht, worth $644 million

  • Top speed reported to be 17 knots, can travel nearly 6,000 kilometers on one fueling

LONDON: Bill Gates has bought the world’s first hydrogen-powered superyacht, which is reported to be worth $644 million.
The Microsoft co-founder has ordered construction of the “Aqua” yacht, which has been designed by Dutch marine architects Sinot and was a big hit at last year’s Monaco Yacht Show.
The vessel will be powered fully by liquid hydrogen, with its only product being water, and will come in at 112-meters long and comprise five decks.
Its top speed is reported to be 17 knots and it can travel nearly 6,000 kilometers before needing to be refueled.


The ship will have its own gym, spa and beauty room, a massage parlour and yoga studio as well as a cascading pool at the rear.
On the lower level, the ship’s 14 guests and 31 crew will be able to view the ship’s hydrogen fuel tanks, which will both weigh 28 tons and will be vacuum-sealed and cooled to -253C to contain the liquid hydrogen fuel which powers the ship.
It is expected to be ready by 2024.
Liquid hydrogen is often touted as a fuel of the future in mass transportation and has already been used in fuel-cell buses in cities such as London, Sao Paulo and San Francisco, as well as in passenger car prototypes and spacecraft propulsion.
Gates, 64, who is reportedly worth $110 billion, regularly rents yachts for his vacations and summer trips on the Mediterranean Sea, but the “Aqua” would be the first vessel he would own.
Speaking to Forbes, designer Sander Sinot said: “With every project, I challenge my team and myself to surpass ourselves.
“For development of AQUA we took inspiration from the lifestyle of a discerning, forward-looking owner, the fluid versatility of water and cutting-edge technology to combine this in a 112 meter superyacht with a fully operational liquid hydrogen and fuel cell system that features groundbreaking in technology, as well as design and aesthetics,” he added.

 


What We Are Reading Today: Dostoevsky: The Seeds of Revolt, 1821-1849 by Joseph Frank

Updated 03 April 2020

What We Are Reading Today: Dostoevsky: The Seeds of Revolt, 1821-1849 by Joseph Frank

The term “biography” seems insufficiently capacious to describe the singular achievement of Joseph Frank’s five-volume study of the life of the great Russian novelist Fyodor Dostoevsky. One critic, writing upon the publication of the final volume, casually tagged the series as the ultimate work on Dostoevsky “in any language, and quite possibly forever.”

Frank himself had not originally intended to undertake such a massive work. The endeavor began in the early 1960s as an exploration of Dostoevsky’s fiction, but it later became apparent to Frank that a deeper appreciation of the fiction would require a more ambitious engagement with the writer’s life, directly caught up as Dostoevsky was with the cultural and political movements of mid- and late-19th-century Russia. Already in his forties, Frank undertook to learn Russian and embarked on what would become a five-volume work comprising more than 2,500 pages. The result is an intellectual history of 19th-century Russia, with Dostoevsky’s mind as a refracting prism.

The volumes have won numerous prizes, among them the National Book Critics Circle Award for Biography, the Christian Gauss Award of Phi Beta Kappa, the Los Angeles Times Book Prize, and the James Russell Lowell Prize of the Modern Language Association.

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