Officials confirm agreement with Turkey on dual nationality under consideration

Pakistan’s Minister for Interior Brig (r) Ijaz Ahmad Shah is holding a meeting with Turkish Ambassador Ihsan Mustafa Yurdakul in Islamabad on January 30, 2020. (Photo courtesy: Interior Ministry)
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Updated 01 February 2020

Officials confirm agreement with Turkey on dual nationality under consideration

  • The measure is considered to address a longstanding demand of Pakistani nationals in Turkey: FO
  • Turkish ambassador to Pakistan says President Erdoğan will visit the country in February with a large delegation

ISLAMABAD: Pakistan’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs confirmed on Saturday that the country was preparing a draft agreement in collaboration with Turkey to grant dual nationality to the citizens of the two countries.

“The Turkish ambassador called on the interior minister last week to discuss matters of mutual interest,” foreign office spokesperson Aisha Farooqui told Arab News. “During the interaction, the question of dual nationality also came up for discussion.”

The decision to prepare the draft, she added, was taken to meet the longstanding demand of the Pakistani community in Turkey.

According to a recent statement by the interior ministry, Federal Minister for Interior Brig (r) Ijaz Ahmad Shah held a meeting with Turkish Ambassador Ihsan Mustafa Yurdakul and resolved to work together and strengthen bilateral ties.

The Turkish ambassador on behalf of his government proposed the two countries to sign an agreement regarding the idea of giving dual nationality to the citizens, the statement added.

“In response to this, the interior minister said that the draft is under consideration and the Ministry of Foreign Affairs is on board with us, we hope to reach a mutual conclusion soon,” said the statement.

The Turkish ambassador also expressed the hope that the process would be expedited to achieve the desired results.

According to the statement, the Turkish ambassador informed that President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan was scheduled to visit Pakistan during the course of this month and would be accompanied by a large delegation.

He also told the minister that the Turkish consulate in Karachi, which is still under construction, is the largest one his country had built anywhere in the world.

“It was heartening to know about the largest Turkish consulate in Karachi,” Minister Shah was quoted as saying, “and we will provide any assistance required from our end to ensure timely operation of the building.”


Pakistani man performs jaw-dropping stunts despite polio impairment

Updated 22 min 4 sec ago

Pakistani man performs jaw-dropping stunts despite polio impairment

  • Muhammad Usman was infected with polio when he was six years old which caused paralysis of his left leg
  • Not being able to walk properly has not deterred Usman from pursuing his dream of performing dangerous stunts at public festivals

QUETTA: Stuntman Muhammad Usman can jump over five cars on a motorcycle and pull a car with a chain tied to a sharp knife hung around his neck.
There are many showmen in Pakistan who can perform such stunts, but Usman, from Pakistan’s southwestern Balochistan province, is special: his left leg was virtually paralyzed after he contracted polio aged six years. Now the 38-year-old leads an active life as a stuntman, saying he never allowed the crippling virus to keep him from pursuing his dreams.

Stuntman Muhammad Usman, a polio sufferer, pulls a car with a chain tied to a sharp knife hanging around his neck in Quetta, Pakistan, on January 17, 2021 (AN Photo by Saadullah Akhter)

“One day I went with my friends to the historic Sibi Mela where I saw various stuntmen performing in the festival,” Usman told Arab News in Quetta. “I asked a man whether I could perform these stunts but he looked at me and replied sarcastically: how can a disabled man become a stuntman.”
That day, Usman said, he resolved to prove his detractors wrong, joined the ‘Power Show Club’ in Quetta’s Nawa Killi neighborhood, and began training under stunt master Shaira Bangulzai.
Pakistan last week launched a nationwide vaccination campaign against polio amid tight security, hoping to eradicate the crippling children’s disease this year. Pakistan had hoped to eliminate polio back in 2018, when only 12 cases were reported. But in the years since there has been an uptick in new cases.
Pakistan and neighboring Afghanistan are the only two remaining countries in the world where polio is endemic, after Nigeria was last year declared free of the wild polio virus.
Usman said he never received polio drops as a child because his illiterate parents were unaware of the dangers posed by the virus.
“But I have been vaccinating my six children with polio drops during every single anti-polio campaign in Quetta,” the stuntman said.

Stuntman Muhammad Usman, a polio sufferer, pictured with his son in Quetta, Pakistan, on January 17, 2021 (AN Photo by Saadullah Akhter)

Bangulzai, who has been Usman’s teacher for around five years, said he had more than 190 students across Balochistan but Usman was the most “loyal and keen” among them. 
“When Usman joined my club and asked me to teach him, I couldn’t refuse him because I didn’t want to break his hopes,” the instructor told Arab News.
In one memorable instance in 2015, Bangulzai said Usman had to replace him at the Sibi Mela after he had to pull out of the event at the last minute to take care of an ailing relative.
“My student [Usman] performed ... with immense confidence and accuracy in what was his first public performance,” the teacher said.
Stunts is not all Usman does.
He is also the driver of a passenger coach and a rickshaw, a performing artist for TV and theater shows, and a comedian.
“What else could I wish from my god?” he said, expressing gratitude for the “full” life he had led despite being a polio sufferer.
Usman is now training his eldest son who at the age of sixteen is already performing at small festivals.

Stuntman Muhammad Usman, a polio sufferer, poses with his son in Quetta, Pakistan, on January 17, 2021 (AN Photo by Saadullah Akhter)

“I want my son to become a famous stuntman in Pakistan,” Usman said. “Because after my death, people will know him by my name.”