Who’s afraid of the big bad wolf? Not Rami, the Saudi who has seven as pets

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Rami Al-Sarhan, an employee of a money transfer company, sits with his sons and his wolf ‘Adeem’ in the traditional majlis at his farm in Al-Jouf. (Reuters)
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The carnivores as being kept as family pets. (Reuters)
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The carnivores as being kept as family pets. (Reuters)
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The carnivores as being kept as family pets. (Reuters)
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The carnivores as being kept as family pets. (Reuters)
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The carnivores as being kept as family pets. (Reuters)
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The carnivores as being kept as family pets. (Reuters)
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The carnivores as being kept as family pets. (Reuters)
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The carnivores as being kept as family pets. (Reuters)
Updated 23 January 2020

Who’s afraid of the big bad wolf? Not Rami, the Saudi who has seven as pets

  • At home with the Saudi man who has four young children … and a pack of ferocious carnivores as the family pets

AL-JOUF: Guests visiting Rami Al-Sarhan’s home in Al-Jouf are understandably concerned when he asks if they would like to stroke the family pets.

These “pets” are not Tiddles the cat and Fido the dog — they are seven fully grown adult wolves.

The normally ferocious creatures make ideal domestic companions, Rami, 30, assured Arab News. And he has no fears for the safety of his young children, aged 8, 6, 4 and 3.

“The wolves literally live with us in the same home,” he said. “They eat with us and follow us when we go to the farm, and even sit with us in the same room when we have guests over.

“They have grown accustomed to our life and do not attack anyone who sits with us, even if they are a stranger.”

His friendship with wolves started about 11 years ago when an uncle started taking them into his home. Rami began studying them and their behavior, which he can now predict with considerable accuracy. The wolves are friendly and pose no danger to humans if handled properly with the correct precautions, he said.

Although they are wild animals, wolves can adapt to a domestic environment and one of the best ways to gain their trust was to share food and eat with them, Rami said.

FASTFACT

Food should be given to wolves without getting too close or interacting directly with them.

However, he is careful not to feed them raw meat, and he keeps his distance from the wolves during the winter mating season, which can last for two weeks.

Food should be given to wolves without getting too close or interacting directly with them, Rami said. “They are naturally ferocious but can be hostile and defensive if someone gets close to them. A wolf eats its prey but gets defensive if it gets attacked.”

Rami is also dismissive of the many superstitions that surround the animals, such as the one about wolves eating jinn. “What is funny is that many people come to me and ask me to give them strands of wolf hair so they can put it on the body of a ‘jinn-haunted’ person for healing” he said. “These are superstitions and do not make any sense.”

However tame a wolf might appear, Rami said, people should always remain cautious around them, study their every move, and avoid doing anything to scare them.

“Most importantly, show your respect to wolves and let them know that you recognize and respect them in order to be friends with you.”

Despite his assurances, if Rami ever invites you to his home “for dinner,” it might be as well to seek confirmation: “Am I eating … or am I the first course?”


Preserving heritage means securing the future, says Princess Haifa

Updated 05 July 2020

Preserving heritage means securing the future, says Princess Haifa

  • Saudi Arabia is at the 209th session to discuss international issues related to the fields of education, science and culture

PARIS: Princess Haifa bint Abdul Aziz Al-Muqrin, the Kingdom’s permanent representative to UNESCO, said that changes can only be faced with global efforts to achieve the common goals of promoting peace, building cultural bridges between nations, and empowering societies to guarantee a better future.

Saudi Arabia recently participated in the 209th session of the UNESCO Executive Council at the agency’s Paris headquarters. The Kingdom was represented at the session by Princess Haifa and a team of 26 Saudi experts from different sectors that have activities related to the scope of UNESCO’s work, such as education, culture, energy, environment, and training.

Princess Haifa said: “Despite our different cultures and languages, we share our belief that education is a right for everyone, that preserving heritage means securing the future, and that innovation and science are the bridge that will pull us out of this pandemic the world today is living.”

She said that the Kingdom supported African countries and was ready to share its experiences in various UNESCO fields, in addition to supporting action plans related to developing islands as one of its priorities in exchanging experiences, especially since the Kingdom is one of the most advanced countries in the world in the field of water desalination.

Reference was made to the Kingdom’s support for international growth and stability through the G20 presidency, specifically with regard to ensuring the continuity of education in crises, the continuation of efforts to achieve climate adaptation worldwide, and solidarity with the members of the G20 in fighting the COVID-19 pandemic.

As a member state of the UNESCO Executive Council, Saudi Arabia is at the 209th session to discuss international issues related to the fields of education, science and culture. These will be evaluated and decided upon, and the executive decisions assigned to them will be voted on, in cooperation with the council’s member states.

The Kingdom’s participation in the meetings of the UNESCO Executive Council also comes as part of its permanent presence in the international cultural and educational organization since its foundation in 1946.

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