US delegation studies Saudi aviation projects

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US delegation concludes visits to the General Authority of Civil Aviation (GACA) and three Saudi airports on Thursday. (SPA)
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US delegation concludes visits to the General Authority of Civil Aviation (GACA) and three Saudi airports on Thursday. (SPA)
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US delegation concludes visits to the General Authority of Civil Aviation (GACA) and three Saudi airports on Thursday. (SPA)
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Updated 14 December 2019

US delegation studies Saudi aviation projects

  • The delegation was briefed about KAIA’s capacity and services

RIYADH: A high-level delegation of CEOs of US airports and air and security service companies concluded its visits to the General Authority of Civil Aviation (GACA) and three Saudi airports on Thursday.
The delegation visited Riyadh’s King Khalid International Airport (KKIA), Dammam’s King Fahd International Airport (KFIA) and Jeddah’s King Abdul Aziz International Airport (KAIA). The visits began on Dec. 8 at the invitation of the US–Saudi Arabian Business Council.
At KAIA, the delegation was welcomed by Sulaiman bin Ahmed Al-Bassam, GACA’s assistant chief operating officer, Abdullah Al-Rimi, assistant to GACA’s president for Hajj and Umrah services, and Essam bin Fouad Nour, the airport’s general manager.
The delegation was briefed about KAIA’s capacity and services, and examined the latest technologies used at the airport and its most important investment opportunities.
At the other two airports, the delegation toured the halls, examined the latest development projects and held meetings with airport officials.
The aim of the visits was to introduce the delegation to the Saudi market, discuss partnership opportunities and exchange industry experience.
The visits are in line with the Saudi Vision 2030 reform plan, which aims to improve the air transport industry according to the highest international standards.


Saudi Arabia’s 6-point plan to jumpstart global economy

Updated 07 July 2020

Saudi Arabia’s 6-point plan to jumpstart global economy

  • Policy recommendations to G20 aim to counter effects of pandemic

DUBAI: Saudi Arabia, in its capacity as president of the G20 group of nations, has unveiled a six-point business plan to jump start the global economy out of the recession brought on by the COVID-19 pandemic.

Yousef Al-Benyan, the chairman of the B20 business group within the G20, told a webinar from Riyadh that the response to the pandemic -— including the injection of $5 trillion into the global economy — had been “reassuring.”

But he warned that the leading economies of the world had to continue to work together to mitigate the effects of global lockdowns and to address the possibility of a “second wave” of the disease.

“Cooperation and collaboration between governments, global governance institutions and businesses is vital for an effective and timely resolution of this multi-dimensional contagion transcending borders,” Al-Benyan said.

“The B20 is strongly of the view there is no alternative to global cooperation, collaboration and consensus to tide over a multi-dimensional and systemic crisis,” he added.

The six-point plan, contained in a special report to the G20 leadership with input from 750 global business leaders, sets out a series of policy recommendations to counter the effects of the disease which threaten to spark the deepest economic recession in nearly a century.

The document advocates policies to build health resilience, safeguard human capital, and prevent financial instability.

It also promotes measures to free up global supply chains, revive productive economic sectors, and digitize the world economy “responsibly and inclusively.”

In a media question-and-answer session to launch the report, Al-Benyan said that among the top priorities for business leaders were the search for a vaccine against the virus that has killed more than half-a-million people around the world, and the need to reopen global trade routes slammed shut by economic lockdowns.

He said that the G20 response had been speedy and proactive, especially in comparison with the global financial crisis of 2009, but he said that more needed to be done, especially to face the possibility that the disease might surge again. “Now is not the time to celebrate,” he warned.

“Multilateral institutions and mechanisms must be positively leveraged by governments to serve their societies and must be enhanced wherever necessary during and after the pandemic,” he said, highlighting the role of the World Health Organization, the UN and the International Monetary Fund, which have come under attack from some world leaders during the pandemic.

Al-Benyan said that policy responses to the pandemic had been “designed according to each country’s requirements.”

Separately, the governor of the Saudi Arabian Monetary Authority said that it was “too early” to say if the Kingdom’s economy would experience a sharp “V-shape” recovery from pandemic recession.