Embrace color and respect the classics this wedding season

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Updated 09 December 2019

Embrace color and respect the classics this wedding season

  • Many designers went back to the basics of Pakistani wedding wear
  • Pantene Hum Bridal Couture Week witnessed the return of timeless red

ISLAMABAD: Nothing can quite kick off the wedding season like a fashion extravaganza dedicated to all things bride, such as the 17th edition of Pantene Hum Bridal Couture Week in Lahore.
From Friday through Sunday, designers from across the country presented their bridal collections, which this year brought even more color to the City of Gardens. Bright hues, dark and monochrome, timeless red, classic blue, mehndi green and turmeric shades of yellow dominated the palette of mostly classic silhouettes.




Honey Waqar's collection on night three of PHBCW. 8th December 2019. (Photo courtesy: Faisal Farooqui/Dragonfly)

Many designers went back to the basics of Pakistani wedding wear, with full lehngas, romantic anarkalis, longer shirt cuts and strong dupatta styling choices.
Aisha Imran, Haris Shakeel and Shamsha Hashwani lead the charge with brights – neons, pastels, saturated hues and jewel tones – in an evident departure from metallics and neutrals which had prevailed on runways in previous years.




Almirah's collection on night one of PHBCW. 6th December 2019. (Photo courtesy: Faisal Farooqui/Dragonfly)

In a teasing contrast to this display of color, Maria B, Munib Nawaz and Almirah embraced the dark side with ink-black creations. The Pantene Hum show has proven that monochrome is no longer a wedding no-go.
Beyond the color-no color juxtaposition, natural pigments also made their way. Haldi – turmeric – which is a staple during pre-nuptial celebrations, entered the runway not as an excellent ingredient of beauty treatments, but a sunny inspiration. Chinyere, Nitasha  Bilal and




Maria B's collection on night two of PHBCW. 7th December 2019. (Photo courtesy: Faisal Farooqui/Dragonfly)

Zonia Anwaar were among the designers who featured warm yellows and oranges in their collections.
Similarly, mehndi – henna – another staple at Pakistani weddings, was embraced by Honey Waqar, Humayun Alamgir and Munib Nawaz, who infused its greens in their pieces.




Mehdi's collection on night three of PHBCW. 8th December 2019. (Photo courtesy: Faisal Farooqui/Dragonfly)

Pantene Hum Bridal Couture Week witnessed the return of timeless red, which for many years was sidelined by metallic shades. Red is far from dead and is now going to be on top again.
With red back, it's also time to rethink pink. From subtle to bold, Kausar Sajad, Nilofer Shahid and Haris Shakeel gave pink a makeover that has us thinking how to reincorporate the hue back into our wardrobes.
And one more special appearance: classic blue. As the Pantone Color Institute has named it the color of the year 2020, it had to be present in this season's trends, and had its day on the ramp in the collections of Souchaj and Sadaf Amir.


Islamabad court orders government to allow India to appoint lawyer for Kulbhushan Jadhav

Updated 03 August 2020

Islamabad court orders government to allow India to appoint lawyer for Kulbhushan Jadhav

  • The former naval commander was arrested in 2016 in Pakistan’s southwestern province of Baluchistan and convicted of espionage
  • India took the matter to the International Court of Justice which ordered a stay on Jadhav’s execution in 2019

ISLAMABAD: The Islamabad high court on Monday ordered the Pakistan government to give India a ‘chance’ to appoint a representative for Kulbhushan Jadhav, an Indian man condemned to death on charges of spying, Pakistani media reported.
Former Indian Naval Commander Kulbhushan Jadhav was arrested in 2016 in Pakistan’s southwestern province of Baluchistan and convicted of espionage and sabotage by a Pakistani military court a year later.
India took the matter to the International Court of Justice (ICJ) which ordered a stay on Jadhav’s execution in 2019, as well as consular access for India. Pakistan was also ordered to conduct an “effective review” of the death penalty.
Indian officials say they have been prevented from obtaining Jadhav’s written consent to arrange legal representation, necessary for a review of his case. Earlier this month, Pakistan invited India to file a review against the death sentence in light of the ICJ judgment.
A two-member bench comprising IHC chief justice Athar Minallah and Justice Miangul Hassan Aurangzeb heard a petition filed by the Pakistan government to appoint a lawyer for Jadhav on Monday.
Responding to the judge’s remarks, Pakistan’s Attorney General Khalid Javed Khan said an ordinance had been passed by parliament recently to give an opportunity to India and Jadhav to file a review petition against the sentence.
“We will contact India again through the Foreign Office,” he said.
Under the ‘International Court of Justice Review and Reconsideration Ordinance 2020’, which was enacted on May 20, a petition for the review of a military court’s decision can be filed with the Islamabad high court through an application within 60 days of its promulgation.
The Pakistan government has said Jadhav refuses to file a review petition or an application to reconsider the military court’s verdict.
Indian external affairs ministry spokesperson Anurag Srivastava said last week Pakistan had blocked all avenues for effective remedy available to India in the Jadhav case, saying New Delhi has so far requested consular access to Jadhav for 12 times over the past one year.