Where We Are Going Today: Oah Amal

Updated 01 November 2019

Where We Are Going Today: Oah Amal

During a short visit to the Sharqiah Season festival in Eastern Province, a colleague took me to “a place where you’ll experience the real Al-Ahsa region.”

He was not wrong; the moment I stepped through the gate of Oah Yamal restaurant in Dammam, my hands moved instinctively to take photos of every detail, from the intricately carved gate and glass-cased antiques such as cameras and radios, to the colorful geometric shapes painted on the stairs.

The menu selection was amazing too, bearing a collection of Gulf dishes I was unfamiliar with. These included jareesh and harees (made of ground wheat and meat, then seasoned), chicken mashkool (chicken served with rice and mixed with potatoes, onions and tomatoes), mutabeq (pancake stuffed with minced meat or cheese) and momawash (mostly served with shrimp and mung beans).

The restaurant also catered for seafood-lovers, and I found the lobster to be delicious.

Oah Yamal is a great place to impress visiting friends, and I will be back with my family who are big fans of traditional food.


What We Are Reading Today: GDP: A Brief but Affectionate History

Updated 14 August 2020

What We Are Reading Today: GDP: A Brief but Affectionate History

Author: Diane Coyle

Why did the size of the US  economy increase by 3 percent in one day in mid-2013—or Ghana’s balloon by 60 percent overnight in 2010? Why did the UK financial industry show its fastest expansion ever at the end of 2008—just as the world’s financial system went into meltdown? And why was Greece’s chief statistician charged with treason in 2013 for apparently doing nothing more than trying to accurately report the size of his country’s economy? The answers to all these questions lie in the way we define and measure national economies around the world: Gross Domestic Product. This entertaining and informative book tells the story of GDP, making sense of a statistic that appears constantly in the news, business, and politics, and that seems to rule our lives—but that hardly anyone actually understands.
Diane Coyle traces the history of this artificial, abstract, complex, but exceedingly important statistic from its 18th- and 19th-century precursors through its invention in the 1940s and its postwar golden age, and then through the Great Crash up to today.
The reader learns why this standard measure of the size of a country’s economy was invented.