Kemetic yoga breathes new life into Egyptian tourism

This type of yoga is different to others, as it focuses on breathing rather than poses.. (Shutterstock)
Updated 18 October 2019

Kemetic yoga breathes new life into Egyptian tourism

  • Egyptian temples have wall carvings which play a major role in the development of Kemitic yoga
  • Kemetic yoga is a blend of physical movements, meditation and controlled breathing

CAIRO: Egypt’s Ministry of Tourism has collaborated with CNN to produce and air a short film about Kemetic yoga to highlight wellness tourism in the country.

Kemetic yoga is a blend of physical movements, meditation and controlled breathing.

The three-minute film was shot in Luxor and follows Sarah Wesley, a certified Kemetic yoga instructor.

“The origins of Kemetic yoga started in the land called Kemit and Kemit is the ancient name of Egypt,” Wesley said.

Egyptian temples have wall carvings which play a major role in the development of Kemitic yoga, along with the study and interpretations of hieroglyphic texts on the subject.

Wesley practices yoga mainly at Karnak Temple, which she described as being full of powerful and peaceful energy.

The practice mainly targets people who want to discover more about themselves and those who wish to expand their consciousness.

HIGHLIGHTS

• Breathing is a significant aspect in all forms of yoga but with Kemetic yoga it is enhanced and highlighted. It is also much slower than other forms of yoga.

• This type of yoga is different to others, as it focuses on breathing rather than poses.

“I hope that the future of Kemetic yoga can reach as many people as possible,” Wesley said.

This type of yoga is different to others, as it focuses on breathing rather than poses.

Breathing is a significant aspect in all forms of yoga but with Kemetic yoga it is enhanced and highlighted. It is also much slower than other forms of yoga.

Kemetic yoga is more than imitating the poses of the gods which have remained eternal due to the carvings on the temple walls. It is a philosophy that aims for self-development.

Kemetic yoga aims to showcase a different side of tourism in Egypt. The film, “Yoga in Egypt,” is one aspect of a partnership between CNN and the ministry, which has launched an international tourism campaign. 

The campaign aims to promote tourism in Egypt by showcasing the country in a different light and changing perceptions about it.

Last month the ministry said it was working with social media influencers to promote Egypt as a travel destination, Al-Ahram newspaper reported.


Turkish police arrest journalist Altan a week after his release

Updated 13 November 2019

Turkish police arrest journalist Altan a week after his release

  • Altan and the others deny the charges against them
  • On Tuesday a higher court overruled the decision to release Altan, ordering his arrest on grounds that there was a risk of him fleeing

ISTANBUL: Turkish police detained prominent journalist and author Ahmet Altan late on Tuesday, a week after he was released from prison in his retrial on coup-related charges, Istanbul police said.

Before his release last Monday, the 69-year-old had been in jail since his arrest in 2016, two months after an attempted coup which Ankara says was orchestrated by the network of US-based Muslim cleric Fethullah Gulen.

The journalist’s case has drawn criticism from human rights groups and Turkey’s Western allies. They are concerned by the scale of a post-coup crackdown against suspected Gulen supporters under President Tayyip Erdogan.

Altan smiled and waved as he was driven away by counter-terror squad police officers after being taken from his home in Istanbul, video and photos published by Turkish media showed.

He was taken to Istanbul police headquarters after a hospital check-up, state-owned Anadolu news agency reported.

Altan, his brother and other journalists were previously sentenced to life in jail for aiding Gulen’s network. Last week he was convicted again in a retrial, but released from jail given the time served.

Altan and the others deny the charges against them.

On Tuesday a higher court overruled the decision to release Altan, ordering his arrest on grounds that there was a risk of him fleeing, Anadolu reported.

Under last week’s verdict, Altan was sentenced to 10 years and six months in jail. Turkey’s high court had overruled the previous life sentences against him in July, sending the file back for re-trial.

Erdogan’s government has jailed more than 77,000 people pending trial since the failed putsch. Widespread arrests are still routine in a crackdown critics say demonstrates growing autocracy in Turkey.

Gulen, who has lived in self-imposed exile in Pennsylvania since 1999, and his followers deny any involvement in the coup. Turkey has repeatedly called on the United States to extradite the cleric.

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