What We Are Reading Today: No Stopping Us Now by Gail Collins

Updated 18 October 2019

What We Are Reading Today: No Stopping Us Now by Gail Collins

No Stopping Us Now is lively, fascinating, eye-opening look at women and aging in America, by New York Times columnist Gail Collins.

Collins was the editorial page editor of The New York Times from 2001 to Jan. 1, 2007. 

She was the first woman editorial page editor at the Times.

No Stopping Us Now “is a chronicle of the herky-jerky nature of older women’s journey to progress in the US over the years,” said Lesley Stahl in a review for the Times.

“It’s eye-opening, brimming with new information and, as you’d expect from Collins, a lot of fun,” added Stahl.

Stahl is a correspondent for 60 Minutes and the author of Becoming Grandma and Reporting Live.

Collins “has delivered a deeply researched, entertaining book about the ragged journey of this increasingly visible segment of America’s population, bringing a reporter’s eye to the facts and anecdotes, and never without humor,” said Stahl.

Collins was also a journalism instructor at Southern Connecticut State University.

Collins’ excavation of the past has produced a vault of nuggets and gems, added Stahl.


What We Are Reading Today: The Seine: The River That Made Paris by Elaine Sciolino

Updated 09 November 2019

What We Are Reading Today: The Seine: The River That Made Paris by Elaine Sciolino

The Seine: The River That Made Paris is a wonderful book from Elaine Sciolino that takes readers on a journey along the Seine river, through France’s fascinating history and a thousand little anecdotes that fill it with life. 

The book “tells the story of the Seine’s origin, its little known source in Burgundy, and the goddess that gave the river its name,” said a review in goodreads.com. 

It also “tells the stories of dozens of fascinating characters that have spent their lives on, around and along the river,” the review added.

It said “Sciolino met with people living on their boats, fishermen, the river police, the firefighters who put out the fire in the Notre Dame Cathedral using water from the Seine, and many more.” 

The characters “come to live with her skillful writing and share their stories of how the Seine has shaped their lives,” said the review.

Sciolino is a writer and former Paris Bureau Chief for The New York Times, based in France since 2002. 

She contributes to The New York Times’ Food, Culture, Styles and Sunday Review sections.