Russian inmates kill jail official in Pakistan prison

File photo of Central Jail Gaddani city in Pakistan's southwestern Balochistan province shows Pakistani human rights activist Sarim Burney, right, during a visit on Nov. 12, 2009. (Photo courtesy: Flickr)
Updated 08 October 2019

Russian inmates kill jail official in Pakistan prison

  • The women who allegedly committed the crime were arrested last year for illegally entering the country
  • Police claim the jail warden was killed due to religious differences

KARACHI: Three Russian inmates in a prison at Pakistan’s shipbreaking coastal city of Gaddani killed a female jail official last night, officials told Arab News on Tuesday.
“The Russian women who were shifted to the prison from Quetta to provide easy counselor access to their country’s diplomatic mission in Karachi killed warden Zoya Bint-e-Yahya Imrani for her religious beliefs,” police officer, Naveed Alam, said while ruling out any attempt of jailbreak.
The accused women were identified as Khadija Bint-e-Abdullah, Zainab and Ayesha Bint-e-Musa.
Police have registered a case against them under section 302 of Pakistan Penal Code (PPC) and kicked off investigations.
Sharing their preliminary findings, Alam said the inmates had religious differences with the warden and thought the jail official was “an infidel.”
Gaddani, which lies some 50 kilometers west of Karachi, is a coastal city in southwestern Balochistan province with the world’s third largest shipbreaking yard.
Rehmatullah, the official investigating the case, said Imrani was deployed at the prison barrack of Russian inmates and was strangled at night while she was sleeping.
The facility currently has 11 female inmates: Five of them belong to Russia, one hails from Chechnya, and the rest are Pakistani citizens.
“These women along a teenage boy were arrested last year for illegally entering Pakistan. They were later shifted to Gaddani prison from Quetta’s district jail for easy counselor access,” said the police officer.
Imrani, a resident of Gaddani, had been working as lady warden at the facility since 2017.
“She was the sole breadwinner of her family that included an ailing father and two young brothers,” the official added.


Hundreds of Pakistanis in UAE get relief packets amid virus lockdown

Updated 02 April 2020

Hundreds of Pakistanis in UAE get relief packets amid virus lockdown

  • More than 1,700 ration bags have been distributed since the community-driven initiative began about a week ago
  • The program has been supported and facilitated by the Pakistani consulate in Dubai

DUBAI: Pakistani community members, who are facing financial hardships due to the ongoing lockdown in the United Arab Emirates, have been regularly receiving ration bags from the Pakistani consulate for nearly a week now.
A community-driven initiative that is supported by the country’s diplomatic mission, the bags are filled with essential food items, such as rice, milk, flour, biscuits and oil, which are separately packed for families and individuals who are either stuck in the gulf state due to flight closures or facing financial crunch after being laid off.
“More than 1,700 packets have been given to people since we started this welfare service five days ago,” Ahmed Amjad Ali, Pakistan’s Consul General to the UAE, told Arab News on Wednesday.
“In the beginning, we received contributions from three or four philanthropists, but now nearly 50 community members are donating the foodstuff,” he said. “We are also contributing from our end, though we are not accepting any cash.”
The family packs weigh around 20 kilograms and the ration is enough to last for 10 to 15 days.
“We have so much stock available now that we can help people for another two weeks,” he added.
The family ration packs have also been distributed in the Northern Emirates, including Sharjah, Ras Al Khaimah, Ajman and Fujairah.
“Since the situation is troubling and people are in need, we are trying to help as much as possible,” he said.

For families that cannot come to the consulate, the packets have also been distributed among those in Sharjah and Ajman.
“We follow our criteria to see if families are indeed needy or not,” said Ali. “We ask them to show us a proof of their passport. Other than that, people who have letters showing that they have been recently laid off are also given preference.”
The consulate staff has undertaken the responsibility of packing foodstuff with different teams.
“This is really a state of emergency, I would say, and people are helping and coming to us because they trust that the consulate is giving to the needy. Everything is going very smoothly and we hope to do more home deliveries over the weekend,” he said.
Every day the consulate teams go to different cities, a process that the diplomatic mission hopes to continue until the difficult situation lasts.
“We are also trying arrange special flights for the stranded people who want to go back to Pakistan. We have also approached the UAE government to look into the exemption of fines for visit visa holders,” he added.
Meanwhile, the Pakistan Association in Dubai has called for volunteers to assist the authorities in the gulf state in their ongoing battle against the coronavirus.
“We already have doctors and nurses working at isolation and quarantine facilities, but we need general volunteers to help the Dubai Police with the distribution of food and ration and help with the general work in the quarantine areas,” the association’s president, Dr Feisal Ikram, told Arab News.