Pakistan’s glitzy bridal fashion week bows out with bold finale

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HSY presents ‘Empire’ as the final collection to walk on the last night of Pakistan Fashion Design Council's L'Oreal Paris Bridal Week 2019. Sept. 28, 2019. (Photo: Faisal Farooqui, Dragonfly)
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Fahad Hussayn Imaginarium presents ‘Labyagawachi the Musical’ on the final night of Pakistan Fashion Design Council's L'Oreal Paris Bridal Week 2019. Sept. 28, 2019. (Photo: Faisal Farooqui, Dragonfly)
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Fahad Hussayn Imaginarium presents ‘Labyagawachi the Musical’ on the final night of Pakistan Fashion Design Council's L'Oreal Paris Bridal Week 2019. Sept. 28, 2019. (Photo: Faisal Farooqui, Dragonfly)
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Fahad Hussayn Imaginarium presents ‘Labyagawachi the Musical’ on the final night of Pakistan Fashion Design Council's L'Oreal Paris Bridal Week 2019. Sept. 28, 2019. (Photo: Faisal Farooqui, Dragonfly)
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Fahad Hussayn Imaginarium presents ‘Labyagawachi the Musical’ on the final night of Pakistan Fashion Design Council's L'Oreal Paris Bridal Week 2019. Sept. 28, 2019. (Photo: Faisal Farooqui, Dragonfly)
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Fahad Hussayn Imaginarium presents ‘Labyagawachi the Musical’ on the final night of Pakistan Fashion Design Council's L'Oreal Paris Bridal Week 2019. Sept. 28, 2019. (Photo: Faisal Farooqui, Dragonfly)
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HSY presents ‘Empire’ as the final collection to walk on the last night of Pakistan Fashion Design Council's L'Oreal Paris Bridal Week 2019. Sept. 28, 2019. (Photo: Faisal Farooqui, Dragonfly)
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HSY presents ‘Empire’ as the final collection to walk on the last night of Pakistan Fashion Design Council's L'Oreal Paris Bridal Week 2019. Sept. 28, 2019. (Photo: Faisal Farooqui, Dragonfly)
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HSY presents ‘Empire’ as the final collection to walk on the last night of Pakistan Fashion Design Council's L'Oreal Paris Bridal Week 2019. Sept. 28, 2019. (Photo: Faisal Farooqui, Dragonfly)
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HSY presents ‘Empire’ as the final collection to walk on the last night of Pakistan Fashion Design Council's L'Oreal Paris Bridal Week 2019. Sept. 28, 2019. (Photo: Faisal Farooqui, Dragonfly)
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HSY presents ‘Empire’ as the final collection to walk on the last night of Pakistan Fashion Design Council's L'Oreal Paris Bridal Week 2019. Sept. 28, 2019. (Photo: Faisal Farooqui, Dragonfly)
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HSY presents ‘Empire’ as the final collection to walk on the last night of Pakistan Fashion Design Council's L'Oreal Paris Bridal Week 2019. Sept. 28, 2019. (Photo: Faisal Farooqui, Dragonfly)
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Nickie Nina presents ‘Gulabkaar’ on the final night of Pakistan Fashion Design Council's L'Oreal Paris Bridal Week 2019. Sept. 28, 2019. (Photo: Faisal Farooqui, Dragonfly)
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Nickie Nina presents ‘Gulabkaar’ on the final night of Pakistan Fashion Design Council's L'Oreal Paris Bridal Week 2019. Sept. 28, 2019. (Photo: Faisal Farooqui, Dragonfly)
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Nickie Nina presents ‘Gulabkaar’ on the final night of Pakistan Fashion Design Council's L'Oreal Paris Bridal Week 2019. Sept. 28, 2019. (Photo: Faisal Farooqui, Dragonfly)
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Nickie Nina presents ‘Gulabkaar’ on the final night of Pakistan Fashion Design Council's L'Oreal Paris Bridal Week 2019. Sept. 28, 2019. (Photo: Faisal Farooqui, Dragonfly)
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Nickie Nina presents ‘Gulabkaar’ on the final night of Pakistan Fashion Design Council's L'Oreal Paris Bridal Week 2019. Sept. 28, 2019. (Photo: Faisal Farooqui, Dragonfly)
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Nickie Nina presents ‘Gulabkaar’ on the final night of Pakistan Fashion Design Council's L'Oreal Paris Bridal Week 2019. Sept. 28, 2019. (Photo: Faisal Farooqui, Dragonfly)
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Republic by Omar Farooq showcases ‘Adamah’ on the final night of Pakistan Fashion Design Council's L'Oreal Paris Bridal Week 2019. Sept. 28, 2019. (Photo: Faisal Farooqui, Dragonfly)
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Republic by Omar Farooq showcases ‘Adamah’ on the final night of Pakistan Fashion Design Council's L'Oreal Paris Bridal Week 2019. Sept. 28, 2019. (Photo: Faisal Farooqui, Dragonfly)
Updated 29 September 2019

Pakistan’s glitzy bridal fashion week bows out with bold finale

  • An impressive line-up by veteran designer HSY concluded bridal week
  • Republic by Omar Farooq played within the limited margins of Pakistan’s traditionally ‘safe’ grooms

LAHORE: Pakistan Fashion Design Council’s L’Oreal Paris Bridal Week 2019 (PLBW) came to a close late Saturday evening, ending its glamorous three-night run in the eastern city of Lahore, with a runway soiree of the country’s veteran designers. Fahad Hussayn, Nickie Nina, Republic by Omar Farooq and Hasan Shehryar Yasin (HSY) each brought to the ramp their artistic vision on what makes a great bridal collection.

FAHAD HUSSAYN

Opening up the night was Fahad Hussayn Imaginarium with “Labyagawachi - The Musical,” a performance of his bridal-wear for the season, included actual dancers and performers, some of them the models themselves. The collection itself grouped together things the designer loves from art to dance, music and fashion, all elements which together created a collection that was glitzy and glam, across a whole palette of oranges, corals, crisp black and white looks.

NICKIE NINA

Veterans of the bridal world, Nickie Nina brought ‘Gulabkaar’ to the ramp, a collection that stayed true to the bridal approach the duo have taken for years. Nickie Nina’s approach to bridal-wear is to bring forth collections that evolve every year, but without sacrificing the details that make a classic Pakistani bridal ensemble. Regal cuts and recognizable silhouettes were delivered in embroidered packaging, and everything brought together with a wide range of colour palettes. Gulabkaar was feminine, elegant, ethereal and very wearable.

REPUBLIC BY OMAR FAROOQ

A little something for the grooms! Republic by Omar Farooq’s ‘Adamah’ was a testament to the designer’s efforts of creating fun, compelling menswear that pushed the envelope, but that Pakistan’s men would still want to wear. Pakistani grooms are more conservative than others in the subcontinent, and Republic plays in that restricted, ‘safe’ space for the grooms and guests that want a little bit more out of fashion. Adamah produced the sharp tailoring Republic is known for and added palatable whimsical touches like light catching the black beading, embroidered printed shawls (and turbans!) and statement-making fabrics.

HSY

HSY’s Empire lived up to the name, taking the ramp in groupings of colours, and producing a bridal squadron that was a fine finish to PLBW ’19. Empire was true HSY, a designer who has honed a portion of the bridal market under his image, which is glamorous, a touch traditional and covered in heavy work. His colour palettes included some of his iconic mixes of black and red but also some slate greys ideal for winter along with ice blues and pinks. Empire is a perfect fit in HSY’s oeuvre, due to it’s familiar structuring and the intricate touches that have become synonymous with HSY the brand.


US blacklists former Karachi cop for ‘serious human rights abuse’

Updated 11 December 2019

US blacklists former Karachi cop for ‘serious human rights abuse’

  • Former district police chief Rao Anwar was granted bail in the Naqeebullah Mehsud murder case in July
  • Young Mehsud’s family welcomed the US decision, hoping he would also get justice in his own country

KARACHI: Family of Naqeebullah Mehsud, an aspiring model who was killed in a staged police encounter in January 2018, applauded the United States on Wednesday for adding former police officer Rao Anwar to its list of individuals responsible for committing human rights abuses in different parts of the world.

“During his tenure as the Senior Superintendent of Police in District Malir, Pakistan, Rao Anwar Khan (Anwar) was reportedly responsible for staging numerous fake police encounters in which individuals were killed by police, and was involved in over 190 police encounters that resulted in the deaths of over 400 people, including the murder of Naqeebullah Mehsood,” a handout circulated by the US Department of Treasury said.

Anwar, it further noted, led a network of police and criminal thugs that was allegedly involved in extortion, land grabbing, illegal drug trade, and murder.

“Anwar is designated for being responsible for or complicit in, or having directly or indirectly engaged in, serious human rights abuses,” the statement added.

The US Department of Treasury’s Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC), on the occasion of International Human Rights Day, took action against 18 individuals based in Burma, Pakistan, Libya, Slovakia, Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) and South Sudan for their roles in serious human rights abuses.

“The United States will not tolerate torture, kidnapping, sexual violence, murder, or brutality against innocent civilians,” said Secretary Steven T. Mnuchin. “America is the world leader in combating human rights abuse and we will hold perpetrators and enablers accountable wherever they operate.”

“Treasury’s action focuses on those who have killed, or ordered the killing of innocents who stood up for human rights including journalists, opposition members, and lawyers,” said Deputy Secretary Justin G. Muzinich.

Mehsud’s family said they were happy with the US decision and hoped they would also get justice in Pakistan.

Malik Hashim Mehsud, a member of the family, said the American move to sanction Anwar was commendable.

“The US sanctions against Rao Anwar or anyone violating human rights should be appreciated,” Mehsud told Arab News, adding that the case of Naqeebullah’s extra-judicial murder was pending in the Supreme Court of Pakistan and it was his family’s hope that justice would ultimately prevail.

“The sanctions imposed on Rao Anwar by the US treasury department should embarrass our criminal justice system and law enforcement agencies who have failed to provide justice so far and not launched an investigation into the killings of 444 individuals who were murdered by him,” a prominent activist and lawyer, Jibran Nasir, told Arab news.

Senior Superintendent of Police Rao Anwar claimed on January 13, 2018, that he had killed four terrorists who were associated with Tehreek-e-Taliban Pakistan, Lashkar-e-Jhangvi, and Daesh.

Four days later, on January 17, friends of Nasimullah Mehsud, popularly known as Naqeebullah Mehsud, claimed on social media that one of Anwar’s victims was known to them, adding that the 24-year-old man was an aspiring model, not a terrorist.

Later, the Supreme Court of Pakistan decided to take a look into the matter, prompting Anwar to abscond.

He surrendered to the court in March 2018 and remained under house arrest until he was granted bail in July 2019. Soon after that, Mehsud’s father, Muhammad Khan Mehsud, who passed away earlier this month, requested the country’s judiciary to cancel the bail.