McDonald’s enlists Alexa and Google to help with its hiring

McDonalds will let job seekers start an application by using voice commands on their smartphones with Amazon's Alexa or Google's Assistant. (File/AP)
Updated 25 September 2019

McDonald’s enlists Alexa and Google to help with its hiring

  • he function is available in the US, Canada, Australia, France, Germany, Ireland, Italy, Spain and the UK
  • Google and Amazon say McDonald’s is one of the first direct employers to use their voice recognition systems this way

Want a job at McDonald’s? Just ask your smartphone.
McDonald’s is now letting job seekers start an application by using voice commands with Amazon’s Alexa or Google’s Assistant.
Users can say, “Alexa, help me get a job at McDonald’s.” Then Alexa will respond by asking which country they want to work in and play McDonald’s catchy “I’m lovin’ it” jingle. After that, users can share their phone number and get a link to continue the application process.
The function is available in the US, Canada, Australia, France, Germany, Ireland, Italy, Spain and the United Kingdom. McDonald’s may add the feature in other markets.
Google and Amazon say McDonald’s is one of the first direct employers to use their voice recognition systems this way.
It’s not yet available through Apple’s Siri.


France ready to take Trump’s tariff threat to WTO

Updated 08 December 2019

France ready to take Trump’s tariff threat to WTO

  • Macron government will discuss a global digital tax with Washington at the OECD, says finance minister

PARIS: France is ready to go to the World Trade Organization to challenge US President Donald Trump’s threat to put tariffs on French goods in a row over a French tax on internet companies, its finance minister said on Sunday.

“We are ready to take this to an international court, notably the WTO, because the national tax on digital companies touches US companies in the same way as EU or French companies or Chinese. It is not discriminatory,” Finance Minister Bruno Le Maire told France 3 television. Paris has long complained about US digital companies not paying enough tax on revenues earned in France.

In July, the French government decided to apply a 3 percent levy on revenue from digital services earned in France by firms with more than €25 million in French revenue and €750 million ($845 million) worldwide. It is due to kick in retroactively from the start of 2019.

Washington is threatening to retaliate with heavy duties on imports of French cheeses and luxury handbags, but France and the EU say they are ready to retaliate in turn if Trump carries out the threat. Le Maire said France was willing to discuss a global digital tax with the US at the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), but that such a tax could not be optional for internet companies.

“If there is agreement at the OECD, all the better, then we will finally have a global digital tax. If there is no agreement at OECD level, we will restart talks at EU level,” Le Maire said.

He added that new EU Commissioner for Economy Paolo Gentiloni had already proposed to restart such talks.

France pushed ahead with its digital tax after EU member states, under the previous executive European Commission, failed to agree on a levy valid across the bloc after opposition from Ireland, Denmark, Sweden and Finland.

The new European Commission assumed office on Dec. 1.