Huawei in public test as it unveils sanction-hit phone

Huawei Mate 20 X (5G) is pictured at the IFA consumer tech fair in Berlin, Germany, on September 5, 2019. (REUTERS/Hannibal Hanschke/File Photo)
Updated 19 September 2019

Huawei in public test as it unveils sanction-hit phone

  • Hit by US sanctions, Huawei's Mate 30 will not be allowed to use Google’s Play Store
  • Household-name services like WhatsApp, Instagram and Google Maps will be unavailable.

BERLIN: Chinese tech giant Huawei launches its latest high-end smartphone in Munich on Thursday, the first that could be void of popular Google apps because of US sanctions.
Observers are asking whether a phone without the Silicon Valley software that users have come to depend on can succeed, or whether Huawei will have found a way for buyers to install popular apps despite the constraints.
The company has maintained a veil of secrecy over its plans, set to be dropped at a 1200 GMT press conference revealing the Mate 30 and Mate 30 Pro models.
Huawei, targeted directly by the United States as part of a broader trade conflict with Beijing, was added to a “blacklist” in Washington in May.
Since then, it has been illegal for American firms to do business with the Chinese firm, suspected of espionage by President Donald Trump and his administration.
As a result, the new Mate will run on a freely available version of Android, the world’s most-used phone operating system that is owned by the search engine heavyweight.
While Mate 30 owners will experience little difference in the use of the system, the lack of Google’s Play Store — which provides access to hundreds of thousands of third-party apps and games as well as films, books and music — could hobble them.
Household-name services like WhatsApp, Instagram and Google Maps will be unavailable.
The tech press reports that this yawning gap in functionality has left some sellers reluctant to stock the new phones, fearing a wave of rapid-fire returns from dissatisfied customers.
Huawei president Richard Yu said at Berlin’s IFA electronics fair this month that his engineers found a “very simple” way to install the hottest apps without going via the Play Store.
Huawei could offer its own app store in a preliminary version, setting itself up as a competitor to the dominant Apple and Google offerings, observers speculate.
Over the longer term, the company could build out a similar “ecosystem” of devices, apps and services as the Silicon Valley companies that would bind users more closely to it.
The world’s second-largest smartphone maker after Samsung, Huawei earlier this month presented its proprietary operating system HarmonyOS, a potential replacement for Android.
The Mate 30 will not yet have HarmonyOS installed.
But it could make for a new round in the decades-old “OS wars” between Microsoft’s Windows and Apple’s Mac OS, then Android versus Apple’s iOS.
Meanwhile, Eric Xu, current holder of Huawei’s rotating chief executive chair, has urged Europe to foster an alternative to Google and Apple.
That could provide an opening for Huawei to build up Europe’s market of 500 million well-off consumers as a stronghold against American rivals.
“If Europe had its own ecosystem for smart devices, Huawei would use it... that would resolve the problem of European digital dependency” on the United States, Xu told German business daily Handelsblatt.
He added that his company would be prepared to invest in developing such joint European-Chinese projects.


Japanese keen to invest in Saudi entertainment, tourism sectors

Saudi Arabia is one large open-air museum, offering a testimony to past civilizations. (Shutterstock)
Updated 24 October 2019

Japanese keen to invest in Saudi entertainment, tourism sectors

  • ‘Japan is one of Saudi Arabia’s main target countries when it comes attracting tourists’

TOKYO: There is a genuine interest among Japanese companies to invest in Saudi Arabia’s rapidly growing entertainment and tourism industries, with some planning to set up their own operations in the Kingdom soon, according to Saudi officials.

Avex, a major Japanese company in the entertainment industry, is planning on “launching its own office in Saudi Arabia and start its own entertainment calendar for it,” Muhannad Abanmy, general manager for entertainment infrastructure development at the Kingdom’s General Entertainment Authority (GEA), told Arab News Japan in an exclusive interview.

“We’ve locked a meeting with Avex (on Thursday) to seal (the deal) with them to open their office in Saudi Arabia,” Abanmy said on the sidelines of the Saudi-Japan Vision 2030 Business Forum in Tokyo on Wednesday.

Avex is one of Japan’s top entertainment conglomerates, founded and led by Max Matsuura. It specializes in the audiovisual business as well as anime, video games, live music events and fireworks, among other entertainment-related industries.

Matsuura, who attended Wednesday’s event, spoke of the successful collaboration between Avex and Saudi authorities during the Saudi National Day in Jeddah, and said the company plans to expand its efforts in the Kingdom.

FASTFACTS

● Total trade volume between both countries is $38 billion.

● The Saudi entertainment industry to generate up to $67 billion in 10 years.

● The Kingdom plans to attract 2 million visitors by 2022.

● Thousands of e-visas have been issued since the launch of Saudi Arabia’s tourism e-visa in September.

Saudi officials are banking on the good relations their country has with Japan, including economic ties. 

They say the size of business cooperation between them can grow further with the new entertainment and tourism sectors opened.

Total trade volume between both countries is $38 billion. But “Japan has a lot to offer in terms of expertise,” Sultan Mofti, deputy governor for investment attraction at the Saudi Arabian General Investment Authority (SAGIA), told Arab News Japan.

“Looking at the size of investments in Saudi Arabia by Japanese companies tells you that there’s a lot of room to grow,” he said.

“The creation of the Saudi-Japan Vision 2030 program, the inauguration of the Riyadh office and the launch of the Tokyo office will help a lot in bridging the gap in communicating opportunities to Japanese businesses,” he added.

“That’s what we offer at SAGIA, by offering a portfolio of 20 services to Japanese businesses that are willing to invest in Saudi Arabia,” Mofti said.

“Investors won’t come until they know the return on their investment is high,” but it will be very rewarding to invest in Saudi Arabia, he added.

The Kingdom has great potential in terms of its purchasing power, with nearly 7 million people residing in each of two cities: Riyadh and Jeddah.

One entertainment event saw nearly 400,000 people attend, to the extent that the organizers had to refuse entry to many due to congestion, said officials. 

They expect the entertainment industry to generate up to $67 billion in 10 years and create hundreds of thousands of jobs as it grows.

Despite being the new kid on the block in the entertainment industry, Saudi Arabia has managed so far to create a buzz worldwide with jaw-dropping festivals and star-studded events. But as with all new things, challenges are bound to emerge.

“It’s challenging because it’s new, but the future is there,” said Abanmy, adding that the few handicaps that have been faced, including lack of regulation at one point, usually get sorted by the GEA.

The Saudi government is adamant on supporting its adolescent entertainment industry and the tourism sector, sparing neither cash nor effort to achieve the goal of becoming a global tourist destination.

Some SR5 billion ($1.33 billion) have been spent over the past two years to launch and support the entertainment industry in Saudi Arabia, attracting millions visitors from within the Kingdom and the wider Arab Gulf, said Abanmy.

Sports events are part of the attraction. In December, Saudi Arabia will host the world heavyweight boxing championship.

A world-class tennis tournament will follow suit in mid-December, which has generated a lot of interest among tourists from near and far, Abanmy said. “Recently, we had some 3,600 tourists arriving at King Khalid Airport at the same time,” he added.

This would not have happened had the Saudis not opened up their country to attract investors, officials say.

Thousands of e-visas have been issued since the launch of Saudi Arabia’s tourism e-visa in September, Majid Al-Ghanim, tourism and quality of life managing director at SAGIA, told Arab News Japan on Wednesday.

The Kingdom plans to attract 2 million visitors by 2022, and to see revenue generated from the sector reaching $2 billion by 2030.

Up to 1 million jobs from direct and indirect tourism-related businesses will be available to Saudis in the next seven years, said Al-Ghanim.

This is part of the sustainability approach that the government is planning and that helps increase employment, he added.

Nearly “75 percent of those jobs will be in the private sector, while the government can fulfill the rest,” he said.

Like Abanmy, Al-Ghanim said the Kingdom is targeting Japanese nationals and investors, adding: “Japan is one of the main target countries when it comes to tourists. We’d like to attract tourists from Japan to Saudi Arabia. We want to target and attract the Japanese.” The two countries share similarities in terms of heritage and tradition, he added.

From tourism visas to fun-filled and adrenalin-generating adventures, the Kingdom can offer it all and much more, said Al-Ghanim.

He added that Saudi Arabia is one large open-air museum, offering a testimony to past civilizations, 2,000 years of human heritage and a diverse ecology.

This is manifested in its “large formation of rocks,” archaeological sites, traditional markets, mild weather on one side of the country and a desert on the other, Al-Ghanim said.

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