New Zealand terror victims’ families arrive in Jeddah to perform Hajj

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Families of victims of the March 2019 attack on mosques in New Zealand, arrive at Jeddah airport on August 2, 2019, prior to the start of the annual Hajj pilgrimage in the holy city of Makkah. (AFP)
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Family members of victims from the New Zealand mosque terrorist attack arrive in Jeddah to perform Hajj. (SPA)
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Family members of victims from the New Zealand mosque terrorist attack arrive in Jeddah to perform Hajj. (SPA)
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Families of victims of the March 2019 attack on mosques in New Zealand, arrive at Jeddah airport on August 2, 2019, prior to the start of the annual Hajj pilgrimage in the holy city of Makkah. (AFP)
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Family members of victims from the New Zealand mosque terrorist attack arrive in Jeddah to perform Hajj. (SPA)
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Families of victims of the March 2019 attack on mosques in New Zealand, arrive at Jeddah airport on August 2, 2019, prior to the start of the annual Hajj pilgrimage in the holy city of Makkah. (AFP)
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Families of victims of the March 2019 attack on mosques in New Zealand, arrive at Jeddah airport on August 2, 2019, prior to the start of the annual Hajj pilgrimage in the holy city of Makkah. (AFP)
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James Munro, Ambassador of New Zealand to the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, speaks with the families of victims of the March 2019 attack on mosques in New Zealand, upon their arrival at Jeddah airport on August 2, 2019, prior to the start of the annual Hajj pilgrimage in the holy city of Makkah. (AFP)
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Family members of victims from the New Zealand mosque terrorist attack arrive in Jeddah to perform Hajj. (SPA)
Updated 04 August 2019

New Zealand terror victims’ families arrive in Jeddah to perform Hajj

  • King Salman last month directed that the families of the attack on two mosques that killed 51 people, are hosted for this year’s pilgrimage
  • The reception was attended by New Zealand ambassador to the Kingdom James Monro and other officials

JEDDAH: Family members of victims from the New Zealand mosque terrorist attack have arrived in Saudi Arabia to perform Hajj.
The pilgrims flew into King Abdul Aziz International Airport in Jeddah on Friday.
King Salman last month directed that the families of the attack on two mosques that killed 51 people, are hosted for this year’s pilgrimage.
They were received by the director of passports at the airport, Col. Sulaiman Al-Yousef.
The reception was attended by New Zealand ambassador to the Kingdom James Monro and other officials.
Monro said the invitation from King Salman was an “exceptionally noble gesture.”
“This move was highly appreciated by the people of New Zealand, not only by the visiting pilgrims,” he said.
The attack on worshippers at Al-Noor Mosque and the Linwood Islamic Center in Christchurch during Friday prayers in March sparked a global outcry.
Brenton Tarrant, a 28-year-old Australian white supremacist, also wounded 49 people when he opened fire on the mosques. His trial is due to begin next year.
About 6,000 pilgrims will perform Hajj this year as part of the Custodian of the Two Holy Mosques’ guests program for Hajj and Umrah, the Saudi Press Agency reported.
King Salman has issued directives to host 2,000 family members of Yemeni soldiers, 1,000 pilgrims from Sudan, 200 family members of the victims of the terrorist attacks in Christchurch, and 1,000 family members of Palestinians killed by Israeli forces.
The total number of beneficiaries of the program since its inauguration has reached 53,747 pilgrims from around the world.
Islamic Affairs Minister Sheikh Abdullatif Al-Asheikh said that hosting the families during the Hajj season was part of Saudi Arabia’s efforts to “confront and defeat terrorism” in all its forms.
Earlier, Minister of Hajj and Umrah Dr. Mohammed Salih Bentin reiterated the Kingdom’s call to pilgrims to dedicate their time to performing Hajj rituals, and to be considerate of their fellow pilgrims.
They must focus on feeling the spirituality of the journey and distance themselves from distractions, such as sectarian or political slogans, the minister said.
“The Kingdom will not tolerate conduct that disturbs Hajj rituals, and the authorities will take the necessary measures to prevent them.”


Tech CEOs caution against fear of job automation at Misk Global Forum

Updated 14 November 2019

Tech CEOs caution against fear of job automation at Misk Global Forum

  • DetraPel manufactures safe nanotech-based protective coatings, and water and stain repellents
  • Luke Tang, CEO of Techcode, said the company is eyeing the Saudi market “to help more startups”

RIYADH: Human capital can never be replaced by technology, said DetraPel CEO David Zamarin at the Misk Global Forum in Riyadh on Wednesday.
“Technology is often misconstrued with loss of jobs,” Zamarin said at a session titled “Humanizing work: Tech is not the bad guy.”
He added: “The goal of technology should be to get rid of routine work that can easily be substituted by technology.”
DetraPel manufactures safe nanotech-based protective coatings, and water and stain repellents.
Zamarin said technology can make things easier, but “we still need people ... and that’s the most important part of it. Humans can do jobs (that) technology can never solve.”
Luke Tang, CEO of Techcode, a China-based global network of startup innovation hubs, said the company is eyeing the Saudi market “to help more startups.”
He added that many technologies are impacting the future of the workplace, workflow and workforce.
“Because of these technology trends, we’ll be able to make better use of our talents,” said Tang, adding that many startups are emerging because of this.
Microsoft’s creative director, Lauren Cascio, said the American multinational tech company’s job is to make things safer. “We’re ... automating dull, dirty and dangerous work,” she added. “We’re prioritizing safety.”