Saudi Arabia, UAE remain top contributors to Pakistan’s remittances

Overall, overseas Pakistani workers remitted $21.84 billion during FY19, showing a growth of 9.68 percent compared with $19.91 billion received during the same period last year, the State Bank of Pakistan said on Wednesday. (Shutterstock)
Updated 11 July 2019

Saudi Arabia, UAE remain top contributors to Pakistan’s remittances

  • The two countries made up 44% of inflows in fiscal year 2018-19
  • Pakistani workers remitted total of $21.84 billion, up 9.6% from last fiscal year

KARACHI: Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates and other Gulf Cooperation Council countries remained key contributors to Pakistan’s remittance inflows for fiscal year 2018-19 (FY19), collectively sending 53.7 percent or $11.74 billion, the central bank has said. 
Overall, overseas Pakistani workers remitted $21.84 billion during FY19, showing a growth of 9.68 percent compared with $19.91 billion received during the same period last year, the State Bank of Pakistan said on Wednesday.
Experts say the devaluation of the rupee and the rise of oil prices in the Middle East are the key reasons for the growth in remittances.
“The dollar rate against the rupee is higher which means Pakistani workers’ families at home receive larger amounts. Also, inflows from legal channels has increased because banks have incentivized,” said Khurram Schehzad, a senior financial analyst and CEO of Alpha Beta Core — a financial advisory firm.
He added: “Our remittances growth mainly comes from the UAE and Saudi Arabia; the inflows from west are minimal.”
In FY19, Pakistani workers in Saudi Arabia remitted $5 billion, 3 percent higher than last year’s $4.8 billion while inflows from the UAE were $4.6 billion, or 6 percent higher than $4.3 billion last year. Collectively, workers from the Kingdom, the UAE and other GCC countries contributed $11.74 billion to remittances in FY19 as compared to $11.38 in FY18.
Saudi Arabia and the UAE remained traditional markets for Pakistani manpower, with emigration patterns for 2018 showing the UAE as the largest destination country for Pakistani emigrants with 54 percent of emigrants, followed by 26.39 percent to Saudi Arabia, 7.11 percent to Oman, and 5.49 percent to Qatar, according to Pakistan’s Bureau of Emigration and Overseas Employment (BEOE).
Pakistani officials say the country is facilitating its workers abroad as they play a vital role in the economy, having helped to reduce pressure on external accounts during the outgoing year.
“We are facilitating Pakistani workers with legal aid through our lawyers and our labor attachés help them in resolving the issues with their Kafeel (sponsors),” said Sheikh Fayyaz Ud Din, Chairman of the National Assembly’s standing committee on overseas Pakistanis. “We also make arrangements in the case of the death of a worker to bring back the body.”
In Saudi Arabia during 2018, the majority of the emigrants came from Bangladesh (257,313) followed by Pakistan (100,910) and India (72,399), BEOE data shows.


Pakistani army chief, Saudi ambassador discuss regional security 

Updated 10 August 2020

Pakistani army chief, Saudi ambassador discuss regional security 

  • Saudi ambassador to Pakistan Nawaf Saeed Al-Malkiy calls on General Qamar Javed Bajwa
  • The two leaders discuss matters of mutual interest, bilateral defense relations 

ISLAMABAD: Nawaf Saeed Al-Malkiy, the ambassador of Saudi Arabia to Pakistan, called on Pakistani army chief General Qamar Javed Bajwa on Monday and discussed the security situation in the region, the military’s media wing said. 
“Matters of mutual interest, regional security situation and bilateral defense relations between the two brotherly countries were discussed during the meeting,” the Pakistani army said in a statement.
Pakistan and Saudi Arabia are longtime allies. Saudi Arabia remains the main source of Pakistan’s remittances despite global business shutdowns amid the coronavirus pandemic. The country has also loaned Pakistan billions of dollars in recent months to help stave off a balance of payments crisis, and offered oil on deferred payments.