Where We Are Going Today: Lily

Updated 02 May 2019

Where We Are Going Today: Lily

Tired of revisiting the same place for brunch? If so, in Lily, Arab News has unearthed a gem of a restaurant.

Located on Prince Turki Al-Awwal Road, Riyadh, opposite the King Saud University women’s campus, Lily offers a varied breakfast and brunch menu to suit most palates.

The restaurant’s décor is delicate and floral with tables set around a large olive tree and two walls made up entirely of windows overlooking a row of tall plants. Another wall is covered in faux grass and dotted with roses, and the high ceiling and sun streaming through the windows give the dining room an airy feel.

The olive tree is fake, but the real olives on offer are tender and juicy, making the fresh breakfast platter a great choice for simple morning fare. Hungrier customers might enjoy the breakfast burrito, packed with crispy potatoes, bacon, Monterey Jack cheese and bright bell peppers.

Lily staff are friendly and accommodating to food allergies. Of the items we ordered, the clear winner was the crunchy French toast.

Open weekdays from 7 a.m. to 3 p.m. and weekends from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m., Lily’s might be the place to head on your next morning off.


AlUla cultural and heritage site to reopen in October

Updated 02 June 2020

AlUla cultural and heritage site to reopen in October

  • Historic destination in northwest of Kingdom will now be accessible to visitors all year round

JEDDAH: When you’re already a quarter-of-a-million years old, a few months out of action because of a coronavirus pandemic is no more than a blip in time.

It is therefore safe to say that when visitors return to AlUla, the culture and heritage destination in northwest Saudi Arabia, not a lot will have changed.

AlUla’s attractions, including the Kingdom’s first UNESCO world heritage site, will reopen in October — and they will now be accessible all year round.

Walks, treks and trails will be available, guided by the local Rawi (Arabic storyteller) or self-guided, for visitors who want to delve deeper into the stories and customs of the region.

A visit to AlUla is a transformative experience to all who have visited — its vast open spaces, its secrets of civilizations gone by and the pure wonder of its landmarks.

“We are developing immersive, light-touch experiences that harness the power and silence of the landscapes, experiences like guided stargazing in a desert night sky that has inspired science, religion, philosophy, art and literature for millennia,” said Phillip Jones of the Royal Commission for AlUla.

Adventure tourists can tear around in a desert buggy or take to the skies in a vintage light aircraft to see volcanic craters and the lava fields of Harrat Khaybar. 

For families, Hijrat Noura, or Princess Noura Farm, offers a chance to observe the local flora and fauna. Winter Park, developed for the Winter at Tantora festival, will also return.

“A visit to AlUla is a transformative experience to all who have visited — its vast open spaces, its secrets of civilizations gone by and the pure wonder of its landmarks,” Jones said.