Donald Tusk says EU still waiting on ‘realistic’ Brexit offer, as Scottish first minister piles pressure on May

The European Union is “still waiting for concrete, realistic proposals from London” on how to break the impasse over Britain’s looming exit, EU President Donald Tusk said Wednesday. (Reuters/File Photo)
Updated 14 February 2019

Donald Tusk says EU still waiting on ‘realistic’ Brexit offer, as Scottish first minister piles pressure on May

BRUSSELS: The European Union is “still waiting for concrete, realistic proposals from London” on how to break the impasse over Britain’s looming exit, EU President Donald Tusk said on Wednesday.
“No news is not always good news,” Tusk said on Twitter after meeting in Brussels with chief EU negotiator Michel Barnier.
Britain is set to leave the 28-member European Union on March 29, but the terms of the divorce remain uncertain after a deal struck with Prime Minister Theresa May was roundly rejected by British lawmakers last month.
May told parliament Tuesday that she needs more time to talk about modifications to the rejected deal with EU officials, who have said they are not prepared to reopen negotiations.
Last week, Tusk raised hackles in London when he said: “I’ve been wondering what that special place in Hell looks like, for those who promoted Brexit without even a sketch of a plan how to carry it out safely.”
Meanwhile, Scottish First Minister Nicola Sturgeon has called on Prime Minister Theresa May to take a no deal Brexit off the table, ITV reported on Wednesday.
Sturgeon said May and her government are being “increasingly reckless and negligent” by not ruling out a no deal Brexit, ITV said.
Unless May can get a Brexit deal approved by the British parliament, she will have to decide whether to delay Brexit or thrust the world’s fifth largest economy into chaos by leaving without a deal.


Japan, US say 3-way ties with S. Korea are key to security

Updated 25 min 25 sec ago

Japan, US say 3-way ties with S. Korea are key to security

  • Relations between Japan and South Korea in recent months have been their lowest in decades
  • Milley also met with PM Shinzo Abe and Defense Minister Taro Kono

TOKYO: The chairman of the US Joint Chiefs of Staff, Gen. Mark Milley, agreed with Japanese officials Tuesday that three-way cooperation with South Korea is key to regional security and that an intelligence sharing pact between Tokyo and Seoul should not be scrapped.
Japanese Foreign Minister Toshimitsu Motegi said he told Milley that discord among the three countries would only destabilize the region and benefit North Korea, China and Russia.
“We shared a view that Japan-US-South Korea cooperation is more important now than ever, as we discussed the latest situation related to North Korea, including the North’s latest launch of ballistic missiles,” Motegi said.
He and Milley also agreed on the importance of the Japan-South Korea intelligence sharing pact. Motegi added that Milley promised to convey that message to South Korea during his upcoming visit there.
South Korea has announced plans to scrap the General Security of Military Information Agreement, or GSOMIA, amid disputes with Japan over trade and wartime history.
The deal, which is set to expire later this month, symbolizes the Asian neighbors’ security cooperation with Washington in the face of North Korea’s nuclear and missile threat and China’s growing influence. US President Donald Trump’s administration has been exerting last-minute pressure on Japan and South Korea to keep the deal.
Milley also met with Prime Minister Shinzo Abe and Defense Minister Taro Kono, according to the Foreign Ministry and news reports.
Relations between Japan and South Korea in recent months have been their lowest in decades.
Japan has denounced South Korean court rulings that ordered Japanese companies to compensate elderly South Koreans for forced labor during World War II, insisting that all compensation issues were settled by a 1965 treaty normalizing relations between the two countries.
South Korea accuses Tokyo of ignoring its people’s suffering under Japan’s brutal colonial rule of the Korean Peninsula from 1910 to 1945, and reacted angrily to Japan’s tightening of controls on key technology exports to South Korea and the downgrading of its trade status.