What We Are Reading Today: Churchill: Walking with destiny by Andrew Roberts

Updated 20 November 2018

What We Are Reading Today: Churchill: Walking with destiny by Andrew Roberts

  • The story Roberts tells is sophisticated and in the end more satisfying
  • The book being deals with all the controversies in his career that you would expect

Winston Churchill was born on Nov. 30, 1874, at Blenheim Palace, the ancestral home of the Duke of Marlborough. 

Historian Andrew Roberts’ insight about Winston Churchill’s relation to fate in “Churchill: Walking With Destiny” comes directly from the subject himself. 

“I felt as if I were walking with destiny,” Churchill wrote of that moment in May 1940 when he achieved the highest office. 

But the story Roberts tells is more sophisticated and in the end more satisfying. 

The book covers Churchill’s post-war warnings about the Soviet threat and his second premiership in the early-to-mid 1950s, including his complex relationship with Anthony Eden, his successor-in-waiting. 

Roberts, who was born in 1963, took a first class honors degree in Modern History at Gonville & Caius College, Cambridge, from where he is an honorary senior scholar and a Doctor of Philosophy (PhD). He has written or edited 12 books, and appears regularly on radio and television around the world.

“The book being deals with all the controversies in his career that you would expect. However nothing can detract from the ultimate conclusion that Winston Leonard Spencer Churchill was a very great man without whom humane civilization would not have been saved during those stern days of the Second World War,” stated a review published in goodreads.com


What We Are Reading Today: Manhattan by Jennifer Thermes

Updated 08 December 2019

What We Are Reading Today: Manhattan by Jennifer Thermes

  • This volume is a rich, multilayered creation worth leisurely exploration

This is an excellent book about the history of Manhattan island, staring with the indigenous tribes who lived there.

Jennifer Thermes’ illustrated chronicle of the history of Manhattan “is filled with a series of loose-limbed, eye-pleasing maps that trace the island’s transformation from the natural landscape of the native Lenape people to the newly built Dutch and English colony to the gridded American metropolis of the early 19th century and so on until the current day,” said a review in The New York Times.

It added: “Thermes has a gift not only for rendering delicate watercolor, colored pencil and ink illustrations but for narrating history in a way that inspires wonder. How terrifying it must have been to live through the Great Fire of 1835! And how exciting it must have been to ride that first subway in 1904!”

The review said: “Just like Manhattan itself, this volume is a rich, multilayered creation worth leisurely exploration. And it will give all children growing up in New York City a new perspective on their hometown.”